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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."
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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:37 AM

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:56 AM

About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 9:32 AM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.

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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | Educated | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

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John Slifko's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:53 PM

geography and history were two of Dewey's most important tools in pedagogy in strengthening the imagination of the child 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 3:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 9:01 AM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Educated | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 7:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | Educated | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.

 

This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 

 

Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 5:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 5:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 5:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!
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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | Educated | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 5:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 1, 2013 9:49 PM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 1, 2013 9:51 PM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Educated | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 10:39 AM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 8:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Educated | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...

 

This article by former President of the United States, Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 

 

Technology-Phones mean freedom Health-Healthy communities prosper Economy-Green energy equals good business Equality-Women rule Justice-The fight for the future is now

 

Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   


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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Educated | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s comment, August 3, 2013 2:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 7:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 6:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

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What the world eats -- a week's worth of groceries

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Jen-ai's curator insight, May 1, 2013 7:03 AM

!  This is so informative.  

Laurie Diamond's curator insight, May 3, 2013 6:03 AM

An interesting look and different cultures

Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 7, 2013 9:40 PM

Q1) How does this slideshow depict the differing socioeconomic situations of countries around the world? (Use the example of at least 2 countries)

Q2) Do you think that the image of an Australian weekly diet is accurate to your own family and why?

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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | Educated | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 2:13 PM

What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 12:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

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Generate Simple World Maps

Generate Simple World Maps | Educated | Scoop.it
Free travel tip and photos from all over the world...

 

This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website. Virtually anyone can make a 1-feature world map by simply clicking on a checklist all of the countries you want highlighted on your map. Second, open the file and add some text and a few lines to label it. This took less than 20 minutes to make with no need for any cartographic or GIS experience (this PNG didn't compress well, the full image of this map can be seen here).


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 30, 2012 7:04 PM

This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website.  Virtually anyone can make a 1-feature world map by simply clicking on a checklist all the countries you want highlighted on your map.  Second, opened the file and added some text and a few lines to label it.  This took 20 minutes to make with no need for any cartographic or GIS experience  (this PNG didn't compress well, the full image of this map can be seen here).

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Global cities of the future

Global cities of the future | Educated | Scoop.it
Explore the cities and emerging urban clusters that will drive dramatic growth and demographic changes over the next generation. A McKinsey Quarterly Economic Studies article.

 

In the next 13 years, 600 cities will account for nearly 65 percent of global GDP growth. That is reason enough to explore this global dataset with over 2,600 metropolitan areas. 


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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Educated | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 8:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 7:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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Earth from Above

Earth from Above | Educated | Scoop.it

I'm a huge fan of Yann Arthus-Bertrand's artistic aerial photography.  This image of Rio de Janeiro and the favela is a striking one. I am also posting this to show the how easy the website justpaste.it is to use.  Students with no website creation training can produce sharable materials online.  Now this isn't the most professional outlet, but I envision some middle school or high school students producing a class project that can be transformed into something that reaches a bigger audience as it is shared with a broader community. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, art, worldwide, K12, edtech.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 7:16 AM
This is a striking image. So much poverty purposely hidden behind the mountain, away from the tourists of Rio de Janeiro. It's a shame they have to live the way they do, there is no help from them from their country.
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Earth's City Lights

Earth's City Lights | Educated | Scoop.it
NASA's Visible Earth catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet...

 

This classic image is full of classroom applications.  The first impulse of most students is to note that this image will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 18, 2012 9:35 AM
This image is pretty amazing to see. It shows what parts of the world are more modernized just by the lights seen from space. Looking at the U.S. and Europe, they are lit up very bright because they are richer parts of the world. As you look at places like Africa and some parts of South America, they are shown in darkness due to poorer areas in those regions.
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:07 PM
I was impressed with the explanation of this picture especially for the simple fact that I thought it was a picture that depicted the population of certain areas of each country. Places like Africa, Brazil, areas of Mexico, and Southern US are not lit because of the areas of forest, desert and less population. Very nice picture. -Michelle Carvajal-