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How Meteorology Changed Agriculture Forever

How Meteorology Changed Agriculture Forever | Educated | Scoop.it
Early meteorology helped farmers predict yield, transforming the agricultural industry.

 

Complaining over the weather is not new, but the science of studying the weather, and its effects on business, is fairly recent. Around [1920], economists were also starting to use statistical methods to predict yield. Although cotton’s price, as shown on the New York Cotton Exchange, fluctuated daily, a “well-known American economist” discovered that he could make the most accurate total yield predictions—more accurate than those of the government crop reports—by analyzing the average weather conditions from May to August. It was now possible to predict when the crops would have a bumper year or a poor one.

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, food production, agribusiness, agriculture.


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Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."


Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatial, mapping, video, ESRI.


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Earth Science Week

Earth Science Week | Educated | Scoop.it

Take part in Earth Science Week 2013! Held October 13-19, ESW 2013 will promote awareness of the many exciting uses of maps and mapping technologies in the geosciences. “Mapping Our World,” the theme of ESW 2013, engages young people and the public in learning how geoscientists, geographers, and other mapping professionals use maps to represent land formations, natural resource deposits, bodies of water, fault lines, volcanic activity, weather patterns, travel routes, parks, businesses, population distribution, our shared geologic heritage, and more. Maps help show how the Earth systems – geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere – interact.


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Malini Mehan's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:49 AM

Earth Science week unleashes the mechanism to understand the  dynamic world. It is a great way to observe and understand the constanly evolving processes that bring about changes in the physical and social landscape. From the evolution of islands off the coast of southern Pakistan, as was reported after the deadly earthquake of 24th September to freak weather and migration of illegal immigrants from Europe to Africa, understanding mapping techniques would give valuable insight into the interaction of the Earth Systems.

Elaine Watkins's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:35 AM

Some awesome activity ideas and unit plans on this site for teachers to do with Earth Science!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 30, 2013 3:58 PM

Bacana! 

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10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena

10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena | Educated | Scoop.it
There are reported cases of fish and frogs raining from the sky, as well as ice bombs attacking earthlings from above.

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FCHSAPGEO's comment, September 16, 2013 6:20 PM
I thought I would add that frogs do fly through the air sometimes!
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:28 PM
This post was interesting to me because living in Virginia Beach, we dont see much interesting amounts of snow, nor rainfall, so we dont know about the many things weather can do. Now knowing this about weather makes it more intersting,and makes me wonder what else could happen??
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:20 PM

The mystery of the world is personally one of my favorite topics, as we've not even come close to exploring every inch of our own planet. As much as I want to see us expand outwards, we should not avoid looking to our own planet with an explorer's eye like many did in the past. This particular article makes me wonder how many unexplained events that ended up in folk legend were the cause of some unique weather pattern or then-unexplained event which we better understand today. I personally saw something like this very recently. On a trip up north towards Vermont for some skiing I spotted that the moon was particularly large that one night. Later on as we were passing by Boston we saw what appeared to be a black line cutting straight through the moon. It extended to each end of the horizon and while it was a cloud, no others were in the sky, and it was so uniform throughout that it made me doubt my own common sense!

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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Dazzling Northern Lights Anticipated Saturday Night

Dazzling Northern Lights Anticipated Saturday Night | Educated | Scoop.it

"A solar flare that occurred around 2 a.m. Thursday morning may create a spectacular display of northern lights Saturday evening. The midlevel flare had a long duration and was directed at Earth.  Solar flares create auroras when radiation from the sun reaches Earth and interacts with charged protons in our atmosphere. The effects are greater at the magnetic poles and weaken as they move south from the Arctic or north of the Antarctic. In the northern hemisphere the results are called the aurora borealis, with the aurora australis being its southern counterpart. The result is a spectacular display of light and color for areas with clear enough views."

 


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Yann Chemali's comment, September 12, 2013 7:30 PM
I never thought that it was possible to see see northern lights as south as Nebraska. That's very cool.
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:43 AM
The aurora borealis (may have butchered that word) is one of the manh beautiful and amazing things that this Earth offers to us! Sadly living in virginia beach it is definitely not as easy to see the lights! Possibly the ONLY reason i would move to alaska/canada and/or some country up north!
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:43 AM
The aurora borealis (may have butchered that word) is one of the manh beautiful and amazing things that this Earth offers to us! Sadly living in virginia beach it is definitely not as easy to see the lights! Possibly the ONLY reason i would move to alaska/canada and/or some country up north!
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Museum of Natural History

Museum of Natural History | Educated | Scoop.it

The Smithsonian Museum of Natural History is a fabulous resource in Washington D.C., but now this museum available virtually.  Teachers can now bring the museums to the classroom with these fantastic Smithsonian virtual tours.   

 

Tags: biogeography, virtual tours, environment, ecology, historical, physical.


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GIS and Earth Science Week 2015

GIS and Earth Science Week 2015 | Educated | Scoop.it

"The 2015 Earth Science Week (Oct 11-17) theme is 'Visualizing Earth Systems.'   Esri’s Earth Science GeoInquiries help educators show and explore critical content in earth science."

 

Tags: physical, mapping, geospatial, ESRI.


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Imagining Continental Drift

"This animated documentary tells the story of polar explorer Alfred Wegener, the unlikely scientist behind continental drift theory."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2015 9:04 PM

While plate tectonics is now universally accepted, when Alfred Wegener first proposed continental drift it was it was greeted with a great deal of skepticism from the academic community.  This video nicely shows how scientific advancement requires exploration and imagination, and whole lot of heart.   


Tagstectonicsphysicalgeomorphology, K12STEM, video.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 20, 2015 12:47 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Educated | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice?

Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice? | Educated | Scoop.it

"Many of us tend to think of Antarctica as a sheet of solid snow and ice. But, in contrast with its peer to the north, the southern pole's ice sheet lies atop a rocky continent. What are its features, its mountains and valleys, plains and coastlines?

A new dataset from the British Antarctic Survey provides the most detailed map ever of the bedrock below, information scientists hope will enable them to better model the affects of climate change on the ice, whose melting will have an impact on climate the world over."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 14, 2013 2:12 PM

This video sheds some light on explorations to uncover truths about one of the most remote places on Earth.


Tags: Antarctica, water, physical, remote sensing, geospatial.


Johani Karonen's curator insight, June 17, 2013 4:46 AM

Talking about challanges - Amundsen and Scott sure had a tough one!

Jason, Charlie's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:33 PM

This is the Intellctual part of Antarctica. This video talks about what is underneathAntarctica. Its' ice is flowing out towardsstone sea and could contribute to sea rise. If Antarctica didn't have anymoreonce our ocean would have a major rise but Antarctica would be a new place. 

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Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape

Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape | Educated | Scoop.it
Climate change is dramatically altering the Swiss Alps, where hundreds of bodies of water are being created by melting glaciers. Though the lakes can attract tourists and even generate electricity, local residents also fear catastrophic tidal waves.

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Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 4:45 AM

What can we do learn of this? Will send this to my students.

Lorraine Chaffer's comment, July 4, 2013 10:36 PM
Inland water - management
Lorraine Chaffer's comment, July 4, 2013 10:36 PM
Climate change impacts
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Boston's unnatural shoreline

Boston's unnatural shoreline | Educated | Scoop.it
Today's 100-year storm surge could be tomorrow's high tide.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 5, 2013 3:05 PM

This set of maps and articles help to explain why sea level rise is such an issue for many major metropolitan areas.  In coastal cities with substantial economic development, much of the current coastal areas where once underwater until landfill projects filled in the bay.  During storm surges (or if and when sea levels rise) these will be the first places to flood.  


Tags: disasters, water, physical, Boston, weather and climate.

Charlotte Hoarau's curator insight, February 6, 2013 5:57 AM

Surging sea represented on an imagery background layer.

Color ramp should be graduated.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:18 PM

Here's somehing to "Swett" over for those who live along the coast:

"Coastal cities are now living in what Brian Swett calls a “post-Sandy environment.” In this new reality, there is no more denying the specter of sea-level rise or punting on plans to prepare for it. And there is no more need to talk of climate change in abstract predictions and science-speak. We now know exactly what it could look like."

Keep in mind that as globalization expands, urbanizaion does as well, putting more and more people at this type of risk.