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The Growing Need for Geographic Education

The Growing Need for Geographic Education | Educated | Scoop.it

"The National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) continues to both promote and celebrate geographic teaching and learning. Our activities include conducting and gathering research, producing journals and other geography publications, developing curricular resources at the K-12 and University levels, providing professional development opportunities, and organizing an annual conference."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 9, 2015 12:52 PM

The NCGE promotes geographic education, which we need now more than ever--here are the labor statistics about the future need for geographers supporting the statements in the image above. 


Tags: NCGE, geography education, labor.

Elisa's curator insight, November 12, 2015 2:00 PM

www .ncge .org

Kaye Morley's curator insight, November 16, 2015 6:31 PM

Great fact to remember for the next subject selection day!

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Creative Destruction

Creative Destruction | Educated | Scoop.it
It's much worse than people realize.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 2015 9:57 AM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tagseconomic, laborglobalization, unit 6 industry.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, March 30, 2015 9:13 AM

Creative destruction may sound like an oxymoron—as sometimes our linguistic creativity is capable of doing, in spite of what certain expressions really mean when looked at closely ("near miss," "wireless fiber")—because it is. Yet in our minds, it makes sense, and that seems to be enough. The problem with "creative" destruction is that the creative side speaks of the "winners" and "destruction" of the losers. So we are up against a "win-lose" situation. The ultimate loss appears when we, while being creative, lose our human traits; the true measure of any technology's positive—or negative–effect on our well being beyond the merely material.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:48 AM

We are becoming obsolete as a Charlie Chaplin film, perpetuate the grace of the silent film as the industry is all forward-talkie.

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The Most Common Job In Every State

The Most Common Job In Every State | Educated | Scoop.it

"The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s. This interactive map and accompanying charts show how those changes played out across the country."

 

Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:48 PM

With the new millennium, jobs have been changed. Also, with new technology, which has led to an increased unemployment rate, different kind of jobs have shifted during the last past two decades. Driver trucks are one of the vast modes of transportation in the U.S. and between Mexico and Canada. It does not require too much to be a tractor-trailer truck operator. Usually, the drivers have a high school diploma and attend a professional truck-driving school. As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase, and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving. Truck drivers provide an essential service to industrialized societies by transporting finished goods and raw materials over land, typically to and from manufacturing plants, retail, and distribution centers. As technology continues to advance, massive globalization seems to be a better option for the economy. Driver trucks present a good chance in the workforce. As a result, driver truck careers are projected to grow 11% between 2012 and 2022. Furthermore, truck driving is a part of American lifestyle, and one of the fastest growing of all occupations.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:33 PM

This is an interesting way to look at each state and it makes sense given the economic opportunities in each state.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 21, 2015 12:34 PM

It's so amazing within 36 years the most common jobs in United States changed drastically. The dominated jobs of secretaries and machine operators got replaced to quickly as new technologies are developed. The one that stuck out the most were truck drivers because it was relatively common in the 1980's and now its dominated the whole country. People are shifting from jobs that machines has replaced and are working in jobs that actually need human involvement. It will be very interesting to see how machines in the future will replace truck drivers without causing major accidents or teaching a human being without classroom interactions.

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Every Job in America, Mapped

Every Job in America, Mapped | Educated | Scoop.it
Are you one of the millions of Americans opting into "job sprawl" over a short commute?

 

Before you dig in to “Where are the Jobs?: Employment in America 2010,” it may help to note that each dot represents a single job—and you can tell what kind of job it is because of its color. Manufacturing and trade jobs are red; professional services jobs are blue; healthcare, education, and government jobs are green; and retail, hospitality, and other service jobs are yellow. You won’t find any dots for federal jobs (no available data), and Massachusetts is missing entirely—the only state to opt out of reporting its employment trends. The end result is a highly detailed map that gives viewers a quick summary of how many and what types of jobs are a part of the economy.


Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


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Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education
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The Most Common Job In Every State

The Most Common Job In Every State | Educated | Scoop.it

"The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s. This interactive map and accompanying charts show how those changes played out across the country."

 

Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:48 PM

With the new millennium, jobs have been changed. Also, with new technology, which has led to an increased unemployment rate, different kind of jobs have shifted during the last past two decades. Driver trucks are one of the vast modes of transportation in the U.S. and between Mexico and Canada. It does not require too much to be a tractor-trailer truck operator. Usually, the drivers have a high school diploma and attend a professional truck-driving school. As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase, and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving. Truck drivers provide an essential service to industrialized societies by transporting finished goods and raw materials over land, typically to and from manufacturing plants, retail, and distribution centers. As technology continues to advance, massive globalization seems to be a better option for the economy. Driver trucks present a good chance in the workforce. As a result, driver truck careers are projected to grow 11% between 2012 and 2022. Furthermore, truck driving is a part of American lifestyle, and one of the fastest growing of all occupations.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:33 PM

This is an interesting way to look at each state and it makes sense given the economic opportunities in each state.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 21, 2015 12:34 PM

It's so amazing within 36 years the most common jobs in United States changed drastically. The dominated jobs of secretaries and machine operators got replaced to quickly as new technologies are developed. The one that stuck out the most were truck drivers because it was relatively common in the 1980's and now its dominated the whole country. People are shifting from jobs that machines has replaced and are working in jobs that actually need human involvement. It will be very interesting to see how machines in the future will replace truck drivers without causing major accidents or teaching a human being without classroom interactions.

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Labor Day 2012

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights.  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.


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