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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | Educated | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
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Creative Destruction

Creative Destruction | Educated | Scoop.it
It's much worse than people realize.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:48 AM

We are becoming obsolete as a Charlie Chaplin film, perpetuate the grace of the silent film as the industry is all forward-talkie.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 12:11 PM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

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The Most Common Job In Every State

The Most Common Job In Every State | Educated | Scoop.it

"The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s. This interactive map and accompanying charts show how those changes played out across the country."

 

Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:48 PM

With the new millennium, jobs have been changed. Also, with new technology, which has led to an increased unemployment rate, different kind of jobs have shifted during the last past two decades. Driver trucks are one of the vast modes of transportation in the U.S. and between Mexico and Canada. It does not require too much to be a tractor-trailer truck operator. Usually, the drivers have a high school diploma and attend a professional truck-driving school. As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase, and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving. Truck drivers provide an essential service to industrialized societies by transporting finished goods and raw materials over land, typically to and from manufacturing plants, retail, and distribution centers. As technology continues to advance, massive globalization seems to be a better option for the economy. Driver trucks present a good chance in the workforce. As a result, driver truck careers are projected to grow 11% between 2012 and 2022. Furthermore, truck driving is a part of American lifestyle, and one of the fastest growing of all occupations.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:33 PM

This is an interesting way to look at each state and it makes sense given the economic opportunities in each state.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 21, 2015 12:34 PM

It's so amazing within 36 years the most common jobs in United States changed drastically. The dominated jobs of secretaries and machine operators got replaced to quickly as new technologies are developed. The one that stuck out the most were truck drivers because it was relatively common in the 1980's and now its dominated the whole country. People are shifting from jobs that machines has replaced and are working in jobs that actually need human involvement. It will be very interesting to see how machines in the future will replace truck drivers without causing major accidents or teaching a human being without classroom interactions.

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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."
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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:37 AM

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:56 AM

About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:32 PM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.

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Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | Educated | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.

 

This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 

 

Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 8:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 8:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 8:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!
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Every Job in America, Mapped

Every Job in America, Mapped | Educated | Scoop.it
Are you one of the millions of Americans opting into "job sprawl" over a short commute?

 

Before you dig in to “Where are the Jobs?: Employment in America 2010,” it may help to note that each dot represents a single job—and you can tell what kind of job it is because of its color. Manufacturing and trade jobs are red; professional services jobs are blue; healthcare, education, and government jobs are green; and retail, hospitality, and other service jobs are yellow. You won’t find any dots for federal jobs (no available data), and Massachusetts is missing entirely—the only state to opt out of reporting its employment trends. The end result is a highly detailed map that gives viewers a quick summary of how many and what types of jobs are a part of the economy.


Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


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A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet | Educated | Scoop.it
Do you know how the internet gets across the ocean? This amazing map shows every cable that makes it possible.

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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:28 PM

And no, not everything has turned virtual! We still rely on concrete stuff. Cables network says a lot about the way our World works. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:07 PM

This article deals with unit 1 because it has to do with maps. This map shows how underwater cables connect the internet throughout the world. The cables transmit 99% of international data instantly. On this map you can also see latency. Another map in this article shows 1912 trade routes and underwater cables today. The routes are similar and the interdependency has stayed but the methods and meanings for each of these things are different. To pass the ocean is risky by the investments, and trading. Sailors took tHess risks and now the tech companies are taking them. The cables are thin in the deep water equalling 3 inches across. In addition the cables are thicker in shallower water. The interesting thing is these cables can go as deep as Mount Everest is high. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

Because globalization.  


Tags: Time-Space Compression, development, technology, economic, globalization, industry, unit 6 industry.

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The Most Common Job In Every State

The Most Common Job In Every State | Educated | Scoop.it

"The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s. This interactive map and accompanying charts show how those changes played out across the country."

 

Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:48 PM

With the new millennium, jobs have been changed. Also, with new technology, which has led to an increased unemployment rate, different kind of jobs have shifted during the last past two decades. Driver trucks are one of the vast modes of transportation in the U.S. and between Mexico and Canada. It does not require too much to be a tractor-trailer truck operator. Usually, the drivers have a high school diploma and attend a professional truck-driving school. As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase, and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving. Truck drivers provide an essential service to industrialized societies by transporting finished goods and raw materials over land, typically to and from manufacturing plants, retail, and distribution centers. As technology continues to advance, massive globalization seems to be a better option for the economy. Driver trucks present a good chance in the workforce. As a result, driver truck careers are projected to grow 11% between 2012 and 2022. Furthermore, truck driving is a part of American lifestyle, and one of the fastest growing of all occupations.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:33 PM

This is an interesting way to look at each state and it makes sense given the economic opportunities in each state.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 21, 2015 12:34 PM

It's so amazing within 36 years the most common jobs in United States changed drastically. The dominated jobs of secretaries and machine operators got replaced to quickly as new technologies are developed. The one that stuck out the most were truck drivers because it was relatively common in the 1980's and now its dominated the whole country. People are shifting from jobs that machines has replaced and are working in jobs that actually need human involvement. It will be very interesting to see how machines in the future will replace truck drivers without causing major accidents or teaching a human being without classroom interactions.

Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education
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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Educated | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:57 PM
This is a pretty informative interactive map of the largest ports in the world. Very well put together to help some understandings of trade. Most of the ports are on the East coast of China which is the Pacific Sea. The reason there are probably so many here in China is because they make a large amount of product that needs to be shipped worldwide. They are like the leading country in imports and exports to other global or major global markets.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

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Labor Day 2012

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights.  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.


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