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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Educated | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 8:57 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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Boston's unnatural shoreline

Boston's unnatural shoreline | Educated | Scoop.it
Today's 100-year storm surge could be tomorrow's high tide.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 5, 2013 3:05 PM

This set of maps and articles help to explain why sea level rise is such an issue for many major metropolitan areas.  In coastal cities with substantial economic development, much of the current coastal areas where once underwater until landfill projects filled in the bay.  During storm surges (or if and when sea levels rise) these will be the first places to flood.  


Tags: disasters, water, physical, Boston, weather and climate.

Charlotte Hoarau's curator insight, February 6, 2013 5:57 AM

Surging sea represented on an imagery background layer.

Color ramp should be graduated.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:18 PM

Here's somehing to "Swett" over for those who live along the coast:

"Coastal cities are now living in what Brian Swett calls a “post-Sandy environment.” In this new reality, there is no more denying the specter of sea-level rise or punting on plans to prepare for it. And there is no more need to talk of climate change in abstract predictions and science-speak. We now know exactly what it could look like."

Keep in mind that as globalization expands, urbanizaion does as well, putting more and more people at this type of risk.

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Climate Change, Disaster Mitigation and City Planning

TED Talks As Vicki Arroyo says, it's time to prepare our homes and cities for our changing climate, with its increased risk of flooding, drought and uncertainty.

 

Our major cities are suceptible to environmental catastrophes for a whole host of reasons.  Cities depend on a smooth of goods, money and services provided by infrastructure that we take for granted and assume will always work 24/7.  Presented in the video are some ideas about how we should rethink our cities with a different ecological paradigm to protect our cities more in the future. 

 

Tags: planning, urban ecology, environment adapt, sustainability.


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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:44 PM

Governements around the world are slowly but surely creating new plans to ensure the safety of the people. They have already worked on evacuation plans and tranportation for getting people out but, they also need to think about where would people go and how will they adapt to their new enviornment. I'm glad that some places started working on plans to build houses, highways, and churches at a higher elevation, but other countries also need help figuring this stuff out. They need a solution to better secure homes and lives. Everyone needs to work together to prepare for climate change and natural disasters, especially those places where are most likely to hit.

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | Educated | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.

 

This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!
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The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | Educated | Scoop.it
After cutting a destructive path through the Caribbean, Hurricane Sandy caused extensive damage along the East Coast this week.

 

While the damage wasn't as bad as many feared it could have been, place and spatial context are especially important in assessing the impacts of a natural disaster.  This is a excellent collection of the many devastating images as a result of Hurricane Sandy.  To see some more local images, Rhode Island Department of Transportation put this collection together.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:18 PM
I am speechless, these images have just torn my heart. Here in Providence, Rhode Island listened to multiple people say "oh this storm was nothing" they apparently need to view these photos, to understand Sandy was a monster of a storm. Mother nature is powerful and she can do just about anything. I am so mind boggled by the images, roads completely torn apart I never knew this could happen from a hurricane. It really made me appreciate how safe I was but now seeing these images really makes me want to get out there and tell more people to look at what happened in NJ,CT,NYC, and other places around the coast. My next step now is to get a donation bin started to send over to those states in major need. This is sure another natural disaster to go down in history.
Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:11 PM
Just with the information given, I can see how much damage the storm actually caused. Flooding and high winds obviously don't go together well. Although some communities weren't hit as bad as previously anticipated, some areas were largely damaged and the money needed to rebuild will be tremendous.
Alaina Rahn's comment, October 4, 2013 10:14 AM
I think it is very sad. I didn't know it was that bad. Now that I see those pictures it makes me feel very bad for those people.