Educated
Follow
Find tag "visualization"
8.9K views | +0 today
Educated
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | Educated | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Annenkov's curator insight, April 16, 12:46 AM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 8:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:06 PM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Educated | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
more...
HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, April 17, 4:00 PM

Ressource numérique interactive mêlant planisphère, routes maritimes, graphiques de l'activité portuaire et vues aériennes des plus grands ports du monde et de leur aménagement notamment pour la conteneurisation du commerce maritime. Une ressource tout à fait exploitable en 4e bien qu'étant en anglais (très peu de texte). On pensera aussi à la classe de terminale et aux DNL anglais.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, April 28, 1:57 PM

Un excellent site très utile lorsque l'on traite de la mondialisation


Pour aller plus loin

    - Site de l'Isemar (une mine)

    - Des statistiques très utiles

    - Les grands ports d'Asie orientale (conférence d'Yves Boquet, FIG, 2009) 

    - Conférence de Jacques Charlier : compte-rendu (conférence FIG 2013)

    - Le conteneur, une histoire de la mondialisation


FIG : Festival International de Géographie de Saint-Dié-des-Vosges


Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 5:05 PM

While this might simply seem like a group of ports the more important message conveyed is that in fact that the majority of them are located in East Asia. Gone are the days of the industrial centers of the earth being located in Europe and the Americas. Paired with cheap labor and ease of global transportation many of these East Asian countries are quickly over coming many of the earths previous economic giants. 

Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive Earth at Night

Interactive Earth at Night | Educated | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Giovanni Della Peruta's curator insight, January 14, 2013 11:54 AM

Thanks to Nic Hardisty

Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, January 14, 2013 12:02 PM
Very good comment, Seth
سعيد محمد's comment, January 15, 2013 11:03 AM
ok
Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Map Projections Matter

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  

 

Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 6:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

When Google Earth Goes Awry

When Google Earth Goes Awry | Educated | Scoop.it

"These jarring moments expose how Google Earth works, focusing our attention on the software. They reveal a new model of representation: not through indexical photographs but through automated data collection from a myriad of different sources constantly updated and endlessly combined to create a seamless illusion; Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation. These uncanny images focus our attention on that process itself, and the network of algorithms, computers, storage systems, automated cameras, maps, pilots, engineers, photographers, surveyors and map-makers that generate them.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2013 11:06 AM

The quote above from Clement Valla shows some of the problems with trusting too completely in a form of technology if you are not sure how it works or what its limitations are.  What does he mean when he says "Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation?"  What does this have to do with the term metadata?   


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art, google.

Mary Rack's curator insight, August 26, 2013 10:10 AM

This post represents a "sub-issue" which underlies many of today's  decisions: How much "information" is really a composite of items that may or may not be related? And how many of our decisions are based on those constructs? As a result, are we liviing in a "house of cards", a fantasy world that is sure to collapse around us one day? It's a scary thought. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:55 AM

I understand that this article mostly depicts the inherent limitations with our current technology within GIS systems but I mostly just found these images to be eerily and awkwardly beautiful. Art made accidentely. Thank-you flawed technology.

Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What the Internet Looks Like

What the Internet Looks Like | Educated | Scoop.it
You are looking at, more or less, a portrait of the internet over an average 24 hours in 2012—higher usage in yellows and reds; lower in greens and blues—created by an anonymous researcher for the "Internet Census 2012" project.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:02 PM
Whoa. This is awesome. Never before had I seen internet usage across the globe before. I wasn’t too surprised by the map its showing. Obviously the United States and Europe would have the highest internet traffic of the world although I was quite surprised to see such massive internet activity in Central America, near Panama and Costa Rica. This data was collected illegally and it was interesting how they did it. It was a bot who hacked into Linux computers with no password (really…) or a default password (still really…) and then tracked their IPv4 address to see their activity. It was a non-threatening bot and they created a readme file on each computer that explained what it was doing however it was still an invasion of privacy and no matter how cool the map came out I cannot agree with their methods of obtaining this information. What interested me at first about this was activity in the Middle East. You can see a lot of activity in Turkey and around the Nile in Egypt, but other than that the rest of the region is fairly dim. It is unfortunate that is so because of how it could help people there, just look at the Arab Spring.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
I found this collection of data very interesting. It reveals a number of different things about the internet across the world and the intensity of its usage.
Most obviously, perhaps, you can see what areas of the world have the most internet usage, or at least access. The areas of highest use seem to certainly match up with what you would expect: high internet usage and access in first world countries in Europe and in the United States, lower internet usage and access in more impoverished areas such as Africa and the Middle East. The amount of internet usage can also be seen increasing and decreasing as the animation moves from right to left, indicating the twenty four hour cycle of a day and presumably decreased internet usage during the night and increased usage during the day. This animation provides fascinating and valuable information about the internet in a unique geographic context. Economic geography is apparent in the concentration of internet usage, while physical geography is evident in the correlation between what parts of the world are accessing the internet at higher rates and when, in contrast to other parts of the world.
Thomas D's comment, May 2, 2013 11:32 AM
I find that this article of Internet usage is very interesting and somewhat helpful in understanding the development of countries. You can see from this that over a 24 hour period of time that the entire United States is lit up with a color. When over this 24 hour period there are places on the map that never once do you see a light or you only can see it for a small period of time. I think this goes to show how greatly our society depends on the Internet nowadays. That we basically use the internet or a computer for just about everything at all times of the day. That in some countries they are so underdeveloped that they barely have access to computers. According to this picture Africa is barely lit up and it’s mostly lit up in South Africa which is one of the growing countries in the world. I think this information although gathered illegally is very interesting to look at and see who uses the internet the most.
Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Digital Globes, a New Way to View the World

Digital Globes, a New Way to View the World | Educated | Scoop.it
Their expense has so far made them rare, but with prices coming down, these glowing, programmable spheres are set to become more common.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 10, 2013 6:24 PM

Due to the expense, only science centers and major museums can afford these digital globes that we see in futuristic movies.  However, as with all new technologies, the price will drop as it is refined and made available for larger market, even if that time is still a ways off.  If this were available in your classroom, it would be splashy, but how much added value would it bring?  What kind of lessons could you teach with this?

Tom Perran's curator insight, January 11, 2013 6:21 PM

Very exciting development in classroom technology!