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Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education!

Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't

Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't | Educated |
American education is largely limited to lessons about the West.


When I turned 15, my parents sent me alone on a one-month trip to Ecuador, the country where my father was born. This was tradition in our family—for my parents to send their first-generation American kids to the country of their heritage, where we would meet our extended family, immerse ourselves in a different culture, and learn some lessons on gratefulness.

My family’s plan worked. That month in Ecuador did more for my character, education, and sense of identity than any other experience in my early life.


Tags: place, tourism, education, geo-inspiration.

Via Seth Dixon
Tony Hall's curator insight, December 3, 2015 11:59 PM

This is a great article. I think it applies to people who live in all developed countries (not just the USA), as well as the privileged people from the less developed places. It touches on a lot of things I care about - seeing, feeling, smelling how other people live. Learning that we are not all the same. Knowing that it is ok to not engage with the "American/Australian/Western Dream". Knowing that it is ok to have your own dreams that are different to other people. 

Tina Little-Coltrane's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:37 AM

An Absolute #TRUTH !!

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 7:15 PM

Being able to travel is a great gift. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing new places and learning about cultures. Unfortunately, the last time that I could afford to travel far from home was when I was young and I didn't understand the amazing opportunity that I had at the time. I traveled to Aruba, and to New Brunswick, Canada. Both amazing places. If I could go anywhere, I'd go to Germany, London, and Ireland as soon as possible. My great grandmother was from England, and my great grandfather was from Canada, I'd like to visit their home towns. Traveling places would definitely be a better learning experience than leaning about a place in school. You get to experience the real thing. Interact with the locals and maybe even get involved with the local traditions. Traveling to learn is definitely an experience worth wild.

Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education!

Thinking like a Geographer

WARNING! This video contains explicit geographical scenes that may offend the non-worldy-wise.

Via Seth Dixon
dilaycock's comment, March 25, 2013 10:10 PM
Love it. Thanks for this Seth. Just in time to promote Geography at parent/teacher night!
Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:34 AM

A facetious look into the world of studying Geography. These students have obviously gone to a masive effort to explore their passion for Geography. While it may not be a stereotypically academic or intellectual piece, this video is a great representation of how a Geographer thinks broadly, critically and evaluatively.

Carmen Martinez's curator insight, August 26, 2014 12:17 PM

Interesting video!

Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education!

Scale taught in Comics

Scale taught in Comics | Educated |

Such as a simple, powerful comic strip to teach the importance of scale.   If you prefer an image with a 'paper' look to it, try this image of the April 19, 2015 post of Mutts. 


Tags: scale, K12, location, fun.

Via Seth Dixon
Karen Breznikar's comment, October 13, 2015 2:36 AM
Simple but effective method of teaching scale to students. Great resource.
Madeleine Carr's comment, October 23, 2015 1:32 AM
I would love to let my students create one of these using the website or by drawing their own. It is a personal way of thinking and I believe that students will be able to retain/grasp the concept of scale through this simple method. It would also be really enjoyable and would allow for creative students to express themselves in geography. Students could then compare their scales with others in the class and you could ask students who have had different yards/towns/country in their lives to share and enhance the enjoyment and importance of multiculturalism.
Matt Bond's comment, November 27, 2015 6:10 PM
Students today are interacting with cartoons through all different mediums from The Simpsons, Family Guy or even those in the newspaper. Cartoons can provide short but affective content transfer in an interesting way. They can be highly emotional and effective in all mediums which is why they are so prone into today's society, which is why as teachers it is important to use cartoons in our classroom to change up the sources in which we use.
Rescooped by MSTA from Geography Education!

82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | Educated |
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.


This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   


Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.

Via Seth Dixon
Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?