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How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | Educated | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.

Via Seth Dixon
MSTA's insight:

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

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Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 9:29 PM
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The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie

The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie | Educated | Scoop.it

"What we call Chinese food (including the fortune-filled cookies) has become an integral part of the American culture and cuisine, with a complex history that dates back to the 19th Century."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 29, 2015 8:28 AM

This  99 Percent Invisible podcast explores the fascinating story of the Americanization of Chinese food, and the icon of Chinese food in the States, the  fortune cookie (no, that is decidedly NOT from China).  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content. 

 

That first podcast is reminiscent of a second podcast from  NPR about an American-style Chinese restaurant that opened in Shanghai to cater to Americans living in China who miss 'Chinese food' as it's made back home.  What's the name of the restaurant?  Fortune Cookie, of course. 

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, California, podcast, historical.

John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 10:44 AM

As with some other cultures, the Chinese food we eat is different from it original homeland (Mexican food is another example). Many thing the fortune cookie if from China, but it is an American idea. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:58 AM

unit 3

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Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World

Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World | Educated | Scoop.it
Eating at the school cafeteria could've been amazing if you grew up almost anywhere but the U.S.

 

Tags: agriculture, food distribution. 


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Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 5:53 PM

This is a really cool article! I always enjoy looking at food from around the world, so I automatically scooped this when I saw it. This is a article with a slideshow of school lunches around the world. At the very end of the photo slide, there is a photo of an American school lunch which is pretty embarrassing compared to Brazil and Finland. This photo series was taken by SweetGreens, and the school lunches were put together to represent an average school lunch, not necessarily what they have every day. 

They talk about how each country eats what is grown around them, while US is processed food like chicken nuggets and chocolate chip cookie.

I really want to move to Brazil and eat their school lunch, haha! It looks so good. For dessert in Finland, they have a berry crepe on their plate! That's awesome! If you have some free time, then be sure to check this out! 

5) Interdependence among regions of food production and consumption

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 6:46 PM

Summary: This article showed a series of pictures, which showed traditional school lunches of different countries. Greece's lunch included a Mediterranean diet, while Brazil's had rice and beans with greens, and the United States had its classic chicken nuggets, chocolate chip cookie, and mashed potatoes. The goal of this article was definitely to show what foods were incorporated into different cultures and climates.

 

Insight: Food is one example of a cultural trait, and quite a prominent one. Tradition may prohibit or encourage eating a certain kind of food, while long term climate also makes a large difference on the crops traditional grown in a country. 

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 10, 9:16 AM

This is an excellent way to compare the impact that agriculture and culture in general have on our schools! 

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Educated | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.

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Stores reject 'wasted food' claims

Stores reject 'wasted food' claims | Educated | Scoop.it
Britain's biggest supermarkets defend their practices after a report suggested that up to half of the world's food is thrown away.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 4:09 PM

The mechanization of the all stages of food production has lead to some strange practices.  The geometry of a food matters for a mechanized processing and also for the aesthetics at the grocery store which leads to slightly misshaped vegetables and fruits are routinely discarded.  There is waste throughout the system, from 'field to fork.'  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Tourism's comment, January 16, 2013 11:29 PM
thanks for the info
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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places

26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places | Educated | Scoop.it
From cheddar cheese to the tuxedo.

Via Seth Dixon
MSTA's insight:

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 11, 11:58 AM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

Emma Boyle's curator insight, March 2, 12:31 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 4, 3:34 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | Educated | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


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Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:01 AM

Ten engaging resources on the geography of food

Kaiden-Leigh Cloete's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:15 PM

This topic connects to our agricultural unit. This article describes the explaining of food. Knowing where our food comes from is a big component in lit today, with all the GMO's going around we don't know what we r busy consuming daily. Having more information in our minds about food would help decrease the long term affects of genetically modified organisms, help maintain a healthy economy, provide more resources such as water, because if GMO's do come to an end then the water will not be as polluted as it is now due to the runoff from the remaining chemicals in GMO's, and also provide a healthy environment for everyone. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:10 AM

I absolutely love this article. It touches on many of the most important and challenging issues facing food production in the world, ranging from food manufacturing ethics to global hunger. I think it's interesting how, although we all eat food everyday, we don't think about the many implications associated with the production and consumption of food. To more privileged people, food is not a big deal, as anyone can get food at any time of day. However, for people who are trying to solve the problems associated with food in the modern world or for people who are suffering from hunger and malnutrition, the information presented in this article is extremely important. Brilliant minds can come together to propose potential solutions for all the problems facing food distribution. I can't wait for the day every child can go to bed with a full stomach, and I am willing to do my part to help make that happen.

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What the world eats -- a week's worth of groceries

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Jen-ai's curator insight, May 1, 2013 10:03 AM

!  This is so informative.  

Laurie Diamond's curator insight, May 3, 2013 9:03 AM

An interesting look and different cultures

Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:40 AM

Q1) How does this slideshow depict the differing socioeconomic situations of countries around the world? (Use the example of at least 2 countries)

Q2) Do you think that the image of an Australian weekly diet is accurate to your own family and why?

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15 foods you can regrow from scraps

15 foods you can regrow from scraps | Educated | Scoop.it
The interest in urban gardening and organic foods has grown as a reaction against a mechanized, commercialization agricultural industry with genetically-modified produce.  Modern consumers are seek...

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Mary Burke's comment, April 14, 2013 5:56 PM
I love this idea. And I every one of these foods. When I'm done with school in two years I'm going to have a garden and get my grandchildren involved. They need to know where food comes from. My dream would be to grow my own food.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 7:37 PM
This is really cool. In this day and age so many consumers are trying to find ways to stay away from the “genetically-modified produce." Many people want to grow gardens and eat more organic and natural products. This article shows ways to grow products from scraps of food such as growing carrots from carrot tops or tomatoes from seeds. This concept is really interesting I had no idea this could be done. I think this idea will catch on and could ultimately make people healthier.
Dave Cottrell's comment, April 27, 2013 4:01 PM
This works very well. I don't just throw out tomatoes that spoil in the house or even on the vine late in the season. If you throw them into a heap in the fall with other garden scraps, they will produce very hardy plants that you can transplant in the spring. When you buy a (non GMO) pumpkin in the fall, save the seeds. Clean them well by washing them, dry them on an old towel, and plant them in cardboard egg cartons in some compost in the spring. These are just a few of the things you can grow from so-called waste!
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Thanksgiving Maps

Thanksgiving Maps | Educated | Scoop.it
Want to know where your Thanksgiving food comes from? 

 

This provides the geography of holiday food production with links to the data so you can map out the data with GIS (links produced by Western Illinois University).


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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land? | Educated | Scoop.it

Tags: infographic, food, agriculture, sustainability, urban, urban ecology, locavore, land use, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.


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Crissy Borton's comment, September 11, 2012 8:36 PM
Looking at purchasing a house in the next year or so and this is one thing we have been looking at. Although we don't want to raise our own meat we would like to grow everything else we eat.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:44 PM

Good visual representation of what it would take to be self sufficient.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:51 AM

If you need a backyard that is about 2 acres to live off the land imagine how big of a backyard you would need if you had a family of 8.