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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | Educated | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


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Fotografie Turismo Italia's comment, May 17, 2013 2:07 AM
I don't know this problem, sorry.
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 9:16 AM

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 10:41 AM

This is fascinating to me

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Educated | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 7:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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Martin Luther King-Then and Today

I Have a Dream Speech Martin Luther King's Address at March on Washington August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring fro...

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, January 20, 2013 7:38 AM

Teachers:  How great would it be to use the actual speech?  Can you say, "primary source?"  Here's an idea:  Print it out and let students close read this important speech, too.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:56 PM

Probably they think that martin Luther king is more important to African American, then the rest of the United States population, but I personally feel that martin Luther king, represent a changing America also he is a very important figure in American history, he should be place in a better location so people that come to visit united states could venerate him as a man who fought for not only for African American but also for every minorities living in the United States.

Norman Chan's curator insight, July 12, 4:50 PM

After watching his speech, I feel that he really worked hard fighting for the African Americans. He must have been really brave to step up and fight for the African American. If there was someone like him at this date, I feel that racism would greatly decreased as many would be inspired one his/her words.

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | Educated | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

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E. Erny-Newton's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:46 AM

What is described here is what psychologist Carol Dweck highlights in her research : fixed mindset vs growth mindset ; some people tend to see achievements as based on innate abilities -they have a fixed mindset. Others see them as the fruit of effort and work -they have a growth mindset.Those two groups react very differently to setbacks : fixed minsets will give up, while growth mindsets will see an opportunity to improve.For more on that, see http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/february7/dweck-020707.html ou en français : http://owni.fr/2011/02/07/apprendre-est-un-etat-d%E2%80%99esprit/

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 8:06 AM

This article has a message about the view of struggling in eastern and western cultures, and how this affects learning.  As an aspiring teacher, I found this very instructive.  The examples used were good and I really find myself wanting to read more on this topic.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 11:20 AM

In this article the resources or lack there of are a huge issue for the children in these schools. It makes me think of our society and the technology and other resources that we have aviable to and dont think twice about compared to this society that has nothing. This also triggered my mind of a prospective teacher as to thinking of the differnces between learning styles in the regions.

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Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of

Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of | Educated | Scoop.it
Dandies in Congo, emos in Iraq, electro-hillbilly truckers in Japan. No matter how hard life can be, people carve out original ways of living.

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Treathyl Fox's comment, February 8, 2013 8:13 AM
Geography has never been one of my best subjects. That’s why I chose your board to follow. I must say you have interesting scoops. I have not been disappointed. You have a great learning center here. Keep scooping!
Treathyl Fox's comment, February 8, 2013 8:20 AM
P.S. The guy in the top photo reminded me of my dad. He was always a sharp-dressed man! :)
John Dyhouse's comment, February 25, 2013 8:35 AM
Interesting cultures showing that people have a need to identify with their peers to be one step ahead of the crowd, I guess
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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | Educated | Scoop.it
As upscale, high-rise condos and hipster bars opened nearby, longtime customers joked: Is this really still “the ’hood”? Not anymore.

 

In a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C. that was historically African-American, Fish in the ’Hood was an iconic restaurant that captured the feel of the area.  Just this May, the storefront restaurant was renamed Fish in the Neighborhood.

Questions to Ponder: Why?  Does it matter?  What does it mean?


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 5:36 PM

I read this article after Moss's op-ed piece, and the tactic that White used in order to keep his business is the practical kind of survival tactic that I found missing in Moss's piece. White says, “We’re adjusting, because it’s the only way to survive. I try to look and see what’s around me.” Instead of refusing to adapt his business to the changing environment, White did what a successful businessman should do: satisy the demands of his clientele. His clientele changed, so his business did. Stories about businesses like White's make me less sympathetic to the people who "cry gentrification."

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 9:16 AM

This article was a very interesting read. It shines a light that, with a moderate and humble pace, gentrification might not completely dismantle a community's cultural identity. Although this shop-keep is making an attempt at keeping up with the change he see's in the neighborhood, it might not be entirely necessary. 

Bottom line, people who are new to a community should be entering and supporting local businesses that have ties to the neighborhood and not just the kitchy hipster bars that pop up like dandelions in an untended meadow.  

Thea Harvey-Brown's curator insight, April 24, 8:17 AM

This is a great article that focuses on the effects of gentrification on a single restaurant. This personal narrative reveals the lack of control that these originally lower income neighborhoods now face.