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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | Educació de Qualitat i TICs | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.

 

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 

 

Tags: urban, megacities.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 10:27 AM
If that's what is predicted for 2025, how populated will our world be by 2050? Scary to think about.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:28 PM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

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The Real World at Night

The Real World at Night | Educació de Qualitat i TICs | Scoop.it

Earlier I have posted the classic image of "Earth Lights at Night," and discussed the classroom uses of the image.  This cartogram helps take that analysis one step further.  This cartogram helps students to visualize the magnitude of population (with the cartogram adjusting area for population) and then to see the patterns of energy use, global consumption and urbanization with in a new light. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:29 AM
This map is obviously not the actual size of countries, but it is in a way. The populations of China and India are so great compared to the rest of the world and this map shows that.
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Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 

I've used similar videos in my classes and students are usually quite shocked to see how a city like Bangkok, Thailand operates.  I've used this as a 'hook' for lessons of population growth, urbanization, economic development, sustainability, megacities and city planning. 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 5:28 PM

It is scary to see areas that use train-tracks as location for the marketplace. When the train approaches, people move inches away, and once the train has left, re-group and keep selling. Even tho this is a way of using areas for multiple things, it is very dangerous and i cant imagine that they foods and items don't get ruined and/or contaminated. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 10:49 PM

The first part of the video you see a train passing by. The next part of the video you see the areas around the train tracks transform into a thriving marketplace. In a mega-city such as Bangkok, one should take advantage of any available space. Most people would not use this area as a marketplace, but these people are not wasting space, as it helps them generate money from their businesses. This area along the train tracks now serves two purposes, one being the transportation from the train and the other a marketplace. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:38 PM

I found this video disturbing.  Maybe because we have train safety taught to us were they stress that you need to stay away from the tracks, here the people are sitting next to a train track and even have goods for sale that the train drives over.  I think it is interesting how they reclaim the space but the mom in me worries about kids getting run over by the train.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:01 PM

Interesting video.

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:37 AM

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:07 AM

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.

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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | Educació de Qualitat i TICs | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


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Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

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Beyond 7 Billion

Beyond 7 Billion | Educació de Qualitat i TICs | Scoop.it
After remaining stable for most of human history, the world's population has exploded over the last two centuries. The boom is not over: The biggest generation in history is just entering its childbearing years.

 

The Los Angeles Times has produced an in-depth interactive feature centered around the impact of an increasing global population.  With videos, population clocks, narrated graphics, maps, photos and articles, this is treasure trove of resources that cuts across many disciplines. 


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Trisha Klancar's comment, August 21, 2012 2:34 PM
Great link, thanks!