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Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | Educació de Qualitat i TICs | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 9:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 3:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.

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Using satellite images, young students learn about human impact on environment

Using satellite images, young students learn about human impact on environment | Educació de Qualitat i TICs | Scoop.it

"With the help of satellite images fifth and sixth grade students at Mr. Tim Blum’s geography class at the University of Wyoming Lab School got a birds-eye view of how humans have impacted or modified their environments. Images acquired by satellites decades apart showed cleared forests, irrigated crop fields in the middle of the deserts, altered landscapes (new roads and water bodies), and urban growth."

 

SD: Geospatial technologies can sound daunting for teachers that don't feel that they are specialists. Yet there are simple ways to make sophisticated technologies very relevant to just about any grade level as this article demonstrates. 


Via Elpidio I F Filho, Seth Dixon
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joachim jake layes's curator insight, February 10, 2014 9:44 AM

great to see 5th & 6th graders learning about environmental impact

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Image Analysis

Image Analysis | Educació de Qualitat i TICs | Scoop.it
One of a number of large wildfires that have affected northern California in 2012, the Chips fire burned more than 75,000 acres by the time firefighters had contained it.

 

2012 is going to go down in United States history as the year with the most acres burned in a single year (statistics only go back to 1960).  The two featured images were taken earlier this month to display a Northern California wildfire; both with the same spatial resolution and acquired for the same instrument (Advanced Land Imager on EO-1 satellite), yet they are quite distinct.  One shows an aerial photograph, displaying exactly what standard visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (showing us what our eyes would normally see).  The other image displays a false color (near infrared) image. 

 

Questions to ponder: what advantages does each image have for analyzing the fire damage?  Drawbacks?  How does the data from both images work together to create a more complete picture of the situation?     

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, environment, land use, disasters, biogeography. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Lisa Fonseca's comment, September 17, 2012 10:22 AM
The first image displays a better visual of exactly where the fire damaged the land, the second image doesn't provide a clear visual to someone, the land effected is foggy. If I was going to visit this specific area in Northern California I would much rather use the first aerial image.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:31 AM
The first image gives a good spatial shot of where the exact hot spots are located that cannot be seen by the naked eye. The second photo will give you a spatial view of what you can actually see. Both are needed to put out the hot spot because they each will provide two different solutions to stop the burning acres.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 2013 8:33 AM

2012 is going to go down in United States history as the year with the most acres burned in a single year (statistics only go back to 1960).  The two featured images were taken earlier this month to display a Northern California wildfire; both with the same spatial resolution and acquired for the same instrument (Advanced Land Imager on EO-1 satellite), yet they are quite distinct.  One shows an aerial photograph, displaying exactly what standard visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (showing us what our eyes would normally see).  The other image displays a false color (near infrared) image. 


Questions to ponder: what advantages does each image have for analyzing the fire damage?  Drawbacks?  How does the data from both images work together to create a more complete picture of the situation?     


Tags: remote sensing, images, environment, land use, disasters, biogeography.