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Neurodiversity Rewires Conventional Thinking About Brains | Wired Magazine | Wired.com

Neurodiversity Rewires Conventional Thinking About Brains | Wired Magazine | Wired.com | EdTopix | Scoop.it
For Wired's 20th anniversary, Steve Silberman chronicles the birth of neurodiversity -- a neologism that called attention to the fact that many atypical forms of brain wiring also convey unusual skills and aptitudes.

Via Lou Salza
Leslie Buford's insight:

The term "Neurodiversity" reflects the way we at Marburn have always thought about Learning Differences.  Until our public education system can provide educational diversity to match the neurodiversity in the world, we may be stuck with the language of deficit and disability as the passwords that allow entry into the world of "Special" education.  How can we bridge this gap?

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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 20, 2013 10:28 AM

Excerpt:

"In the late 1990s, a sociologist named Judy Singer—who is on the autism spectrum herself—invented a new word to describe conditions like autism, dyslexia, and ADHD: neurodiversity. In a radical stroke, she hoped to shift the focus of discourse about atypical ways of thinking and learning away from the usual litany of deficits, disorders, and impairments. Echoing positive terms like biodiversity and cultural diversity, her neologism called attention to the fact that many atypical forms of brain wiring also convey unusual skills and aptitudes...."

Bill Keeney's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:16 AM

If there were no advantages to certain ways of structuring the brain, they would have died out evolutionarily.  How can we structure education to build the skills of those kinds of brains?  Not an easy question for an enterprise built around the "fine grained" skills of literacy and numeracy...

 

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50 years after the March on Washington, what would MLK march for today? - The Washington Post

Leslie Buford's insight:

Interesting question.  For those that like to include a study of MLK around his birthday, or for current events within social studies, this might be good source for close reading practice... identify fact and opinion within the text, determine if there is sufficient evidence to support claims about what Dr. King would think about modern problems, etc.  In the end, I would hope that it  ight inspire the greater conversation about how an idividual can make a difference.

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Defining My Dyslexia

Defining My Dyslexia | EdTopix | Scoop.it
Perhaps I’ve succeeded not despite, but because of, my disability.

Via Bill Keeney
Leslie Buford's insight:

As our school works to clarify our goals and models for teaching students to be self aware and strong self-advocates, I would love to engage them in a thoughtful analysis of this concept. They have to define the concept of dyslexia (and ADHD, autism, and any other labels they may be hung with) for themselves anyway.  

 

The media has certainly noted a correlation between these wildly creative, successful adults and learning disbailities, but I also have to wonder, does correlation equal causality?  Sucess in the world depends on work ethic and cognitive flexibility, two assets that dyslexic students absolutely have to develop if they are going to manage school, than on the completion of language intense assignments that school success requires.  Perhaps this is the essential question at the heart of the issue.  Which came first?  The non-traditonal neurology, or the assets that lead to success?  Either way, identifying and building on strength is always a better model for success that living in the shadow of deficits.  Terrific article!

 

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Bill Keeney's curator insight, May 23, 2013 1:36 PM

A great piece that really defines the debate over how we are to characterize "dyslexia"--is it a disability? Is it a difference (neurodiversity)? Is is a STRENGTH?  Really interesting, provocative thinking.

KKeller@DVFSchool's curator insight, May 24, 2013 8:49 AM

Instead of focusing on weaknesses... "A more precise definition of dyslexia would clearly identify the disabilities that go along with it, while recognizing the associated abilities as well. If the dyslexic community could popularize such a definition, then newly diagnosed dyslexics would realize that they, like everyone else, will face their futures with a range of strengths and weaknesses." 

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10 Practical Ideas For Better Project-Based Learning In Your Classroom

10 Practical Ideas For Better Project-Based Learning In Your Classroom | EdTopix | Scoop.it
10 Practical Ideas For Better Project-Based Learning In Your Classroom

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA, Bill Keeney
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Bill Keeney's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:21 AM

This is a lot of work to set up, and a lot of retraining (of the TEACHERS) to assess...and also very difficult to manage, given students' very wide range of skills and aptitudes in terms of technology, but also independence in setting work schedules, staying on task, meeting deadlines, etc...Worth it, but takes time and practice!

KKeller@DVFSchool's curator insight, May 14, 2013 12:07 PM
Bill Keeney's insight:

This is a lot of work to set up, and a lot of retraining (of the TEACHERS) to assess...and also very difficult to manage, given students' very wide range of skills and aptitudes in terms of technology, but also independence in setting work schedules, staying on task, meeting deadlines, etc...Worth it, but takes time and practice!

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How to Take Notes in Class - SOAR Study Skills

How to Take Notes in Class - SOAR Study Skills | EdTopix | Scoop.it

... The process of taking notes requires students to: pay attention to lectures about topics they usually don’t know much about, pay attention to lectures about topics they usually don’t *care* much about, process new information on-the-spot, determine if that information is important enough to write down, determine if that information is a “main idea” or “detail,” and then synthesize that information into their own words immediately.  (Preferably short words.)

Leslie Buford's insight:

I've read lots of books and articles about teaching study skill to students who struggle with learning differences, and this article captures the the issues related to note taking extremely well.  I especially like the way she incorporates the language of social media to help students understand the concept of short-hand.  The newsletter from SOAR has had several really good articles, such that I am considering buying Susan Kruger's book and/or program.  Has anyone used the SOAR program in a school setting?  I'd love to hear from you!

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Rescooped by Leslie Buford from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Dyslexia Revealed - In Their Own Words

Hear right from the people who understand dyslexia best: a teacher, a neuropsychologist, a former public school superintendent of schools who now is the head of the Windward School in NYC"


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 28, 2013 10:06 PM

Well worth 5 minutes!--Lou

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The Free Online Timeline Maker Is Here: Instant Timeline

The Free Online Timeline Maker Is Here: Instant Timeline | EdTopix | Scoop.it

Office Timeline is a free timeline maker PowerPoint add-in that allows you to easily create and share beautiful simple timelines, gantt charts, and project schedules.


Via Robin Good
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John's curator insight, August 22, 2013 9:47 AM

That is just very handy. Thanks for sharing this excellent tool! 

Alfredo Corell's comment, May 1, 2014 1:08 PM
thanks, but the link is not working now
Margarita Parra's curator insight, December 14, 2014 12:20 PM

Hay que probar esta nueva herramienta. La liga directa:https://www.officetimeline.com/download
 

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Eye to Eye - About Us

Eye to Eye - About Us | EdTopix | Scoop.it

Eye to Eye's mission is to improve the life of every person with a learning disability. We fulfill our mission by supporting and growing a network of youth mentoring programs run by and for those with learning differences, and by organizing advocates to support the full inclusion of people with learning disabilities and ADHD in all aspects of society.

 
Leslie Buford's insight:

Fabulous idea!

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Neurodiversity Rewires Conventional Thinking About Brains | Wired Magazine | Wired.com

Neurodiversity Rewires Conventional Thinking About Brains | Wired Magazine | Wired.com | EdTopix | Scoop.it
For Wired's 20th anniversary, Steve Silberman chronicles the birth of neurodiversity -- a neologism that called attention to the fact that many atypical forms of brain wiring also convey unusual skills and aptitudes.

Via Lou Salza
Leslie Buford's insight:

The term "Neurodiversity" reflects the way we at Marburn have always thought about Learning Differences.  Until our public education system can provide educational diversity to match the neurodiversity in the world, we may be stuck with the language of deficit and disability as the passwords that allow entry into the world of "Special" education.  How can we bridge this gap?

more...
Lou Salza's curator insight, April 20, 2013 10:28 AM

Excerpt:

"In the late 1990s, a sociologist named Judy Singer—who is on the autism spectrum herself—invented a new word to describe conditions like autism, dyslexia, and ADHD: neurodiversity. In a radical stroke, she hoped to shift the focus of discourse about atypical ways of thinking and learning away from the usual litany of deficits, disorders, and impairments. Echoing positive terms like biodiversity and cultural diversity, her neologism called attention to the fact that many atypical forms of brain wiring also convey unusual skills and aptitudes...."

Bill Keeney's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:16 AM

If there were no advantages to certain ways of structuring the brain, they would have died out evolutionarily.  How can we structure education to build the skills of those kinds of brains?  Not an easy question for an enterprise built around the "fine grained" skills of literacy and numeracy...

 

Rescooped by Leslie Buford from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Special Ed Best Practices Inspire Successful Expanded Learning Time for All Students

Special Ed Best Practices Inspire Successful Expanded Learning Time for All Students | EdTopix | Scoop.it
Craig Haas, Special Ed and Student Services Coordinator at Edwards Middle School, shares how his team uses expanded learning time to provide relevant academic support to each individual student while breaking down stigmas between children of...

Via Lou Salza
Leslie Buford's insight:

Each child is special, all students are special, and therefore shouldn't all education be special?  It's sad that the common usage of the term Special Education has stigmatized the label., and exciting to see evidence of a school striving to serve each of its unique students.

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Lou Salza's curator insight, May 27, 2013 1:27 PM

Innovation achieved by  applying special education approaches to all learners.  Makes me wish common sense was common practice!--Lou

 

Excerpt: 

"Enriching the School Community

By integrating the students based solely on academic focus, the Edwards staff has been able to eliminate old stigmas. By designing groups based on need and not achievement, students who once never interacted with each other during the core day are now sitting side by side with the understanding that, no matter their differences, they share a common academic challenge..."

 
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How Graduates Can Get Ahead

How Graduates Can Get Ahead | EdTopix | Scoop.it
By Jack and Suzy WelchHow can ambitious graduates entering the corporate world quickly distinguish themselves as winners?First of all, forget some of the most basic habits you learned in school. Once
Leslie Buford's insight:

Great article for high school students to read.  Maybe even middle school students should engage in this discusion, as they build habits of mind that will develop throughout the rest of their school careers.

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A Book for Every Reader | Scholastic.com

A Book for Every Reader | Scholastic.com | EdTopix | Scoop.it

"Each year, I try to guide students to picking books they will love. It can be a challenge to get some students to read outside of their comfort zone, while others hear they should read something tougher and jump way above the right level for them. As a springtime treat, I go back to that first observation and match students to books. Some of my students have never received a book as a gift, or never had someone pick something special for their interests. So this ritual is fun for me and for them."

 
Leslie Buford's insight:

The great summer reading debate has begun in our school.  To assign the books or allow free choice?  Graded assignments or incentive programs? Count minutes, pages, or books?  In the end, we just want them to keep reading over the summer.  Here's one list that might help.

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Introducing Tch Teams: A Path to Deeper Collaboration for Educators

Introducing Tch Teams: A Path to Deeper Collaboration for Educators | EdTopix | Scoop.it

We believe Tch Teams combines everything educators love about Teaching Channel with several new custom tools to collaborate around video, including:

The ability for schools, districts, and education organizations to host and share their own videos of exceptional teaching practiceA place for coaches, mentors, and new teacher training programs to use video as a means for reflecting and collaborating to improve teacher practicesThe ability for educators to share other resources along with video including lesson plans, presentations, and any other digital resourcesDirect integration with Google Docs and Microsoft Office to bring all of your PD assets into one place
Leslie Buford's insight:

Maybe this could offer another opportunity to observe each other's practice.

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Science Fair

Science Fair | EdTopix | Scoop.it

Calling All Teachers and Students! Do you or one of your students have a genius idea for a science project that  could help make the world cleaner and greener?  Submit science project entries on or before May 30, 2013!

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Learning Ally Launches One in Five Initiative to Drive Dyslexia Awareness and Give Hope

Learning Ally Launches One in Five Initiative to Drive Dyslexia Awareness and Give Hope | EdTopix | Scoop.it
Hard-hitting PSA draws families, specialists and dyslexics online to share stories and resources, educate society and debunk myths.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 17, 2013 10:02 AM

Check out the 1 minute video loop--Not sure about the estimate that one in five is dyslexic, but there are a lot of us! With all due respect to Dr. Samuel Kirk, <http://voices.yahoo.com/samuel-kirks-incredible-life-work-journey-1581727.html> who coined the term 'learning disability' in 1963; I suggest we stop calling dyslexia a learning disability. I have seen no reasearch that suggests dyslexics can't learn. Kids at my school asked me if I had a learning disability and I responded honestly: "No", I said, "I do not have a learning disability, I have dyslexia." --Lou

 

Excerpt:

"...Today, the national nonprofit Learning Allyannounced the launch of the 1in5 Initiative, a campaign to drive public awareness of dyslexia and offer hope and resources for the millions of individuals affected by it. The campaign combines a viral public service announcement along with an extensive community-driven website, Explore1in5.org...."