Applying Tech in ...
Follow
8 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Leslie G Perry from Geography Education
onto Applying Tech in Learning
Scoop.it!

SimCity EDU

SimCity EDU | Applying Tech in Learning | Scoop.it
SimCityEDU - Create & Share SimCity Learning Tools

Via Seth Dixon
Leslie G Perry's insight:

It's all about gaming to help them get connected. I heard a story from a colleague today. He said that every year at this school, an veteran would come and talk to the students about the military and World War II but students really didn't get it. So the next year, he had them all play Call of Duty right before the veteran visited the school. He had them storm the beaches of Normandy (on the hardest level). They all failed. The next time the veteran came to speak, they were animated and asking questions about how could they have managed such a feat. 

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 10, 2013 9:30 PM

I will confess that I have personally never played SimCity, but I do know educators that have tapped into that gaming experience to teach spatial thinking and some principles of urban planning.  This link is designed with those teachers in mind.  


Tags: urban, planning, spatial, unit 7 cities, edtech.

Jamie Strickland's comment, March 11, 2013 2:36 PM
I played the original when it first came out--it was a lot of fun to watch the city grow and change. I had a colleague that used one of the more recent versions in his land use planning course. This will be interesting to poke around in.
Seth Dixon's comment, March 12, 2013 4:43 PM
The game is getting more sophisticated: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/26/simcity-is-smarter-than-you-even-if-you-re-an-urban-planner.html
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Leslie G Perry from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge

'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge | Applying Tech in Learning | Scoop.it

"The city of Paris will start removing padlocks from the Pont des Arts on Monday, effectively ending the tourist tradition of attaching 'love locks' to the bridge. For years, visitors have been attaching locks with sentimental messages to the bridge in symbolic acts of affection. Some further seal the deal by throwing keys into the Seine River below.  It was considered charming at first, but the thrill wore off as sections of fencing on the Pont des Arts crumbled under the locks' weight. The bridge carries more than 700,000 locks with an estimated combined weight roughly the same as 20 elephants."


Via Seth Dixon
Leslie G Perry's insight:

I LOVE Seth Dixon's insight on this and how it figures in with Design Technology. What mark do we leave and why? What are the unintended consequences of leaving out mark?

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Graffiti, tombstones, love locks, monuments...each of these are manifestations of people's desire to have some tangible impact on the landscape.  Something that manifests a connection to place in a profoundly personal way. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do people want leave a mark on places that are meaningful to them?  When do you think that they that these markers are appropriate or inappropriate?  Do we have more of a 'right' to mark some places than others? Why do many oppose these personal marks on the landscape?

more...
Marc Meynardi's curator insight, June 2, 2015 1:53 AM

This tradition is particularly appreciated by Chinese tourist. Annecy got a bride called "lLe Pont des Amours" where love locks are regularly removed.

Linda Denty's curator insight, June 4, 2015 8:32 PM

Great discussion point for your classes!  As Seth Dixon says why do people choose to leave a mark on certain places and is this appropriate?  Could people be doing something else that doesn't have such a deleterious effect on it's environment?  

CMuddGeo's curator insight, June 7, 2015 6:29 PM

This is understandable but very sad...

Rescooped by Leslie G Perry from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
Scoop.it!

​Net neutrality becomes the law of the land

​Net neutrality becomes the law of the land | Applying Tech in Learning | Scoop.it
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted today to accept FCC chairman Tom Wheeler's proposal that the Commission "use its Title II authority to implement and enforce open Internet protections." Or, to put it in plain English, your ISP must provide equal broadband access to you or any site -- Amazon, Netflix, etc. -- without slowing down or speeding up sites for additional fees.

 

So, what will this mean for you? Wheeler declared that this new stance "will ensure the Internet remains open, now and in the future, for all Americans." We'll see. As Mark Cuban, serial entrepreneur, said on CNBC, "Let the lawsuits begin."

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Net+Neutrality

 


Via Gust MEES
Leslie G Perry's insight:

I'm developing a unit for students on considering the ethical issues in technology. This story is definitely one for students to consider. What is the right of humans to have free and open access to the internet? How would things be different if the rich had priority access to the net?

more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, February 26, 2015 1:53 PM
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted today to accept FCC chairman Tom Wheeler's proposal that the Commission "use its Title II authority to implement and enforce open Internet protections." Or, to put it in plain English, your ISP must provide equal broadband access to you or any site -- Amazon, Netflix, etc. -- without slowing down or speeding up sites for additional fees.


So, what will this mean for you? Wheeler declared that this new stance "will ensure the Internet remains open, now and in the future, for all Americans." We'll see. As Mark Cuban, serial entrepreneur, said on CNBC, "Let the lawsuits begin."


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Net+Neutrality


SageRave of Get Custom Content's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:53 PM

The internet should be protected from at least a little corporate greed, and this is a good start. Having to pay more for decent speed would be a disaster for those of us who make some, if not all, of our income from working online!

Alicia Henderson's comment, April 14, 2015 1:11 AM
the Internet will remain open now and in the future
Rescooped by Leslie G Perry from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
Scoop.it!

Nature inspires drones of the future

Nature inspires drones of the future | Applying Tech in Learning | Scoop.it
Researchers have been taking tips from nature to build the next generation of flying robots. Based on the mechanisms adopted by birds, bats, insects and snakes, scientists have developed solutions to some of the common problems that drones could be faced with when navigating through an urban environment and performing novel tasks for the benefit of society.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Drones

 


Via Gust MEES
Leslie G Perry's insight:

Amazing and it holds great promise to apply nature to design robots but ask students, what potential ethical dilemmas does this pose? If robots begin to look and act like those in nature, whose to regulate how these robots are used?

more...
Rescooped by Leslie G Perry from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

SimCity EDU

SimCity EDU | Applying Tech in Learning | Scoop.it
SimCityEDU - Create & Share SimCity Learning Tools

Via Seth Dixon
Leslie G Perry's insight:

It's all about gaming to help them get connected. I heard a story from a colleague today. He said that every year at this school, an veteran would come and talk to the students about the military and World War II but students really didn't get it. So the next year, he had them all play Call of Duty right before the veteran visited the school. He had them storm the beaches of Normandy (on the hardest level). They all failed. The next time the veteran came to speak, they were animated and asking questions about how could they have managed such a feat. 

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 10, 2013 9:30 PM

I will confess that I have personally never played SimCity, but I do know educators that have tapped into that gaming experience to teach spatial thinking and some principles of urban planning.  This link is designed with those teachers in mind.  


Tags: urban, planning, spatial, unit 7 cities, edtech.

Jamie Strickland's comment, March 11, 2013 2:36 PM
I played the original when it first came out--it was a lot of fun to watch the city grow and change. I had a colleague that used one of the more recent versions in his land use planning course. This will be interesting to poke around in.
Seth Dixon's comment, March 12, 2013 4:43 PM
The game is getting more sophisticated: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/26/simcity-is-smarter-than-you-even-if-you-re-an-urban-planner.html
Rescooped by Leslie G Perry from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet | Applying Tech in Learning | Scoop.it
Do you know how the internet gets across the ocean? This amazing map shows every cable that makes it possible.

Via Seth Dixon
Leslie G Perry's insight:

An am amazing map on different levels. The cables that drive the trade and ideas resemble maps of historical routes that heralded the modern era, which is made clear with the the vintage look. Check out the article from Vox. This is an excellent map for use in a variety  of subjects.  http://www.vox.com/2015/3/13/8204655/submarine-cables-internet ;

more...
Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 5:46 PM

Summary:  This article discusses what all has to go behind globalization via the internet.   

 

Insight:  This article is very relevant to the concepts we learned in Unit 1.  It shows that globalization is not as easy as it may seem because of the separation of the worlds regions.

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:28 PM

And no, not everything has turned virtual! We still rely on concrete stuff. Cables network says a lot about the way our World works. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:07 PM

This article deals with unit 1 because it has to do with maps. This map shows how underwater cables connect the internet throughout the world. The cables transmit 99% of international data instantly. On this map you can also see latency. Another map in this article shows 1912 trade routes and underwater cables today. The routes are similar and the interdependency has stayed but the methods and meanings for each of these things are different. To pass the ocean is risky by the investments, and trading. Sailors took tHess risks and now the tech companies are taking them. The cables are thin in the deep water equalling 3 inches across. In addition the cables are thicker in shallower water. The interesting thing is these cables can go as deep as Mount Everest is high. 

Rescooped by Leslie G Perry from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
Scoop.it!

Tiny robotic scallops can swim through blood and eyeball fluid to fix you up

Tiny robotic scallops can swim through blood and eyeball fluid to fix you up | Applying Tech in Learning | Scoop.it

For years now, scientists have been trying to develop microscopic robots that can swim through bodily fluids and repair damaged cells or deliver medicine. Now, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Germany believe they've got the perfect design -- in the form of scallops so small, they can barely be seen by the naked eye. These micro-robo-scallops move back and forth to swim through blood, eyeball fluids and other liquids inside our body. The scientists believe mimicking the way a true scallop swims is ideal, due to a number of reasons.



Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, November 7, 2014 6:34 PM

For years now, scientists have been trying to develop microscopic robots that can swim through bodily fluids and repair damaged cells or deliver medicine. Now, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Germany believe they've got the perfect design -- in the form of scallops so small, they can barely be seen by the naked eye. These micro-robo-scallops move back and forth to swim through blood, eyeball fluids and other liquids inside our body. The scientists believe mimicking the way a true scallop swims is ideal, due to a number of reasons.



Rescooped by Leslie G Perry from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

Via Seth Dixon
Leslie G Perry's insight:

Very interesting view of the forces of erosion. This would make a good addition to any science discussion that covers erosion and the forces of nature on the land.

more...
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.