Higher Education
Follow
Find
319 views | +0 today
Higher Education
This content will focus on higher education information relevant to students and faculty
Curated by MFaculty
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by MFaculty
Scoop.it!

Five Self Employment Ideas | Check Out These Self Employment Ideas

http://www.toptiertravelbusiness.com/self-employment-ideas - Are you looking for self employment ideas? I have devised a list of the top five self employment...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from Yeaaah! Citation Generators and much more :DD
Scoop.it!

2: Qiqqa Tutorial: adding bibliographic information to your PDFs

2: Qiqqa Tutorial: adding bibliographic information to your PDFs | Higher Education | Scoop.it
This tutorial shows you how easy it is to add BibTeX and PubMed XML reference information to your PDFs in your Qiqqa Library. You can then export these recor...

Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from Reference Management Tools
Scoop.it!

Qiqqa Tutorial: Manage your research PDF collection with ease!

This tutorial shows the basic features of Qiqqa. It shows many of the techniques Qiqqa offers for you to manage your research PDF collection, including PDF annotation and PDF text exporting.


Via DrHariri
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from eLearning Industry
Scoop.it!

The Adult Learning Theory - Andragogy - of Malcolm Knowles

http://elearningindustry.com/the-adult-learning-theory-andragogy-of-malcolm-knowles Malcolm Shepherd Knowles (1913 – 1997) was an American educator well known

Via Christopher Pappas
MFaculty's insight:

This is an impressive overview

more...
Christopher Pappas's curator insight, May 13, 2013 6:04 AM

The Adult Learning Theory - Andragogy - of Malcolm Knowles - Presentation

Feel Free to Embed the Presentation at your blog, site, or course!

http://www.slideshare.net/elearningindustry/the-adult-learning-theory-andragogy-of-malcolm-knowles

Rescooped by MFaculty from Decision Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Habits: Why we do what we do

The connection between organizational habits and decisions.


Via Lorien Pratt
MFaculty's insight:

This is a phenomenal podcast on the essential role of habits and how we can drill down to the foundation of our habits and, using micro-initiatives, make small incremental adjustments to reap greater rewards. What is very interesting is the fact that habits follow one or more of five basic needs. This short 15min audio could be a game changer for leaders, managers, and everyone in between!

more...
Lorien Pratt's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:05 PM

"When you talk to… great CEOs, what they talk about are habits...

5% of your job as a CEO is making the big strategy choice...

95% is managing ...the small choices.

Good managers understand the importance of habits...bad managers pretend that organizational habits don't exist."

Rescooped by MFaculty from Police News
Scoop.it!

Journal Times editorial: Let’s find middle ground on license plate readers

Journal Times editorial: Let’s find middle ground on license plate readers | Higher Education | Scoop.it
On top of five Racine squad cars there is a small device that likely most people do not notice, but that has attracted lots of attention. They are license plate

Via Law Enforcement
MFaculty's insight:

LPR's looking much like "Five" from the 1986 movie Short Circut (short Circuit (1986), have become increasingly noticed on mobile police vehicles.

more...
Law Enforcement's curator insight, December 3, 2013 1:59 PM

Scoop Courtesy of:  LP Police http://lppolice.com Law Enforcement & Government Agencies - "Catch the Bad Guys" - America's #1 Link Analysis Software

Rescooped by MFaculty from Police News
Scoop.it!

DHS: Does Anyone Care Anymore? - Courtesy of the Defense Media Network

DHS: Does Anyone Care Anymore? - Courtesy of the Defense Media Network | Higher Education | Scoop.it
Commentary about whether the administration and congress care about DHS anymore.

Via Law Enforcement
MFaculty's insight:

This is an interesting insight into the practice of politics - "when it's not raining, no one runs for the umberella." Although the author shares a sideways indictment of the administrations focus, some of the points made seem justified...and unfortunately valid.

more...
Law Enforcement's curator insight, December 12, 2013 11:41 AM

Scoop Courtesy of:  LP Police http://lppolice.com - "Investigative Database & Link Analysis for Law Enforcement & Government Agencies"

ArthurGPeterson's curator insight, February 2, 2014 3:08 PM

Provocative essay capturing the impact of Executive branch leadership failure and Congressional oversight mess.

Rescooped by MFaculty from iPads in Education
Scoop.it!

10 Fundamental Apps for Your New iPad ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Fundamental Apps for Your New iPad ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Higher Education | Scoop.it

"So congrats you've got your new iPad and can't wait to start using it. I know excitement and curiosity to discover newly bought things particularly electronic gadgets makes us want to learn everything about them quickly. Unfortunately it does take a little time and practice ( usability) to get yourself pretty familiar with your iPad. My advice is to start with  some " how to " video tutorials " available on YouTube and get yourself acquainted with the different specs in your iPad. Now comes the second task which is that of searching for and selecting the apps to install. I compiled the list below featuring some of the fundamental apps you should start with."


Via John Evans
MFaculty's insight:

I actually use most of these apps daily; specifically Evernote, Gmail, Kindle and Dropbox. Although I have the Nook app, I have yet to use it, which may account for it missing from the list of ten.

The Penultimate app seemed intriguing so I've downloaded it, and will kick the tires to se whether or not it stays in my app collection.

 

This listed collection is pretty good, but I wonder what others consider to be their top ten essential apps for the iPad?

more...
Kirsty Watts's curator insight, January 2, 2014 5:53 PM

Great place to start when you get a new iPad. I use Evernote religiously.

Eva Watson's comment, January 3, 2014 5:16 PM
Check out this app I made Kodaline in the Window's store..available for free download here http://bit.ly/KnVRTi
Scooped by MFaculty
Scoop.it!

New Jersey State Police intelligence units target high-crime areas in Trenton

New Jersey State Police intelligence units target high-crime areas in Trenton | Higher Education | Scoop.it
The troopers’ mission in the city is to decrease violent crime, and the analysts will use the crime data they collect to target areas that need policing the most.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

Law Enforcement’s Use of Social Media and the Perception of Rising Crime

Law Enforcement’s Use of Social Media and the Perception of Rising Crime | Higher Education | Scoop.it
About the author: Lieutenant Chris Hsiung is assigned to Special Operations and is the social media manager in charge of strategy, community engagement and growth through the police department social media channels.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

Working Upstream: A Story « improving police

Working Upstream: A Story « improving police | Higher Education | Scoop.it

“As problem-oriented policing has evolved over the last two decades, it has emphasized evaluation of problems and the importance of solid analysis, development of pragmatic responses to the problem, and the need to ...


Via Rob Duke
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MFaculty
Scoop.it!

Evidence based practice (not)

Evidence based practice (not) | Higher Education | Scoop.it
I have blogged about this before (the Society of Evidence Based Policing) but I felt moved to blog again because I think some people are using the phrase 'evidence based practice' unwisely (I say generously).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MFaculty
Scoop.it!

IBM i2 Intelligent Law Enforcement Demo

IBM i2 Intelligent Law Enforcement is designed around a holistic view of policing and justice partner agencies by removing barriers to information sharing an...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

Home - academic and research PDF management - Qiqqa

Qiqqa is a software tool designed for academics. Student, undergrads, postgrads, or other researchers... if you deal with a lot of PDFs or ideas, you'll love Qiqqa.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from Reference Management Tools
Scoop.it!

Qiqqa Tutorial: adding bibliographic information to your PDFs

This tutorial shows you how easy it is to add BibTeX and PubMed XML reference information to your PDFs in your Qiqqa Library. You can then export these records to LaTeX, LyX or Microsoft Word 2007 when it's time to write up!


Via DrHariri
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

Theory of Everything (intro)

A brief intro to the current theory of (almost) everything - the Standard Model of particle physics. It's like cake, only universal.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?)

180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?) | Higher Education | Scoop.it
If you haven’t tried a free MOOC, I’d do it sooner than later. In recent weeks, the whole MOOC project took a hit when a University of Pennsylvania study found what was becoming empirically obvious — that MOOCs generally have very low participation and completion rates, and what’s more, most of the students taking the courses are “disproportionately educated, male, [and] wealthy,” and from the United States. This study, combined with other disappointing experiments and findings, will likely make universities think twice about sinking money into creating MOOCs (they can cost anywhere from $15,000 to $50,000 to develop). It might take another 6-12 months to see the shift. But I’d hazard a guess that this January might be the peak of the free MOOC trend. Enjoy them while they last. Whatever their shortcomings, they can be quite informative, and you can’t beat the price.

Via Dennis T OConnor
MFaculty's insight:

The insights revealed through the previous studies serves to codify what many educators, and even more marketers knew intuitively; free always begs the question of quality. Don't hear what I'm not saying. I'm not saying ALL MOOCs are low quality, I'm merely saying that without academic rigor and effective management, even the best intentions can slide off the rails.

 

I too had noted a number of previous MOOC supporters distancing themselves from the initiatives. Was there ever an identified demand for MOOCs, or were they simply a result of benevolent thinking? Regardless, it is interesting that the 'target audience' for MOOCs are apparently the ones taking least advantage of them. Perhaps the age old marketing rendition of supply and demand has merit still has merit.

more...
gustavo salazar's curator insight, January 7, 2014 7:50 AM

180 mooc's para empezar el año en la cresta de la ola

Steve Vaitl's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:49 AM

Very little of this do I find this surprising.

Tammy Morley's curator insight, January 8, 2014 7:43 PM

Food for thought.

Rescooped by MFaculty from Decision Intelligence
Scoop.it!

How To Build An Antifragile Career

How To Build An Antifragile Career | Higher Education | Scoop.it
When the economic future feels more iffy than ever randomness should not be something to fear but rather something to exploit. Author-provacateur...

Via Lorien Pratt
MFaculty's insight:

Whether you're looking to climb the corporate ladder or simply establish a stable career, it's important to know the fragility of your position.

more...
Lorien Pratt's curator insight, December 7, 2013 2:25 PM

One of the best anecdotes illustrating antifragility I've seen, and a pragmatically useful one (including to this 9-to-5 worker turned entrepeneur), at the heart of this article:

 

"Taleb compares two brothers: one an office worker, the other a taxi driver. Volatility is present in the career of each: while the office worker has randomness “smoothed away” by the regularity of salary and employment, he is like a turkey in mid-November, fragile to risk presently out of view. On the other hand, the taxi driver--who Taleb describes as being of the class of artisan, much like a carpenter or plumber--experiences a natural randomness in his daily fluctuations of fares, but is less prone to large shocks. Indeed, Taleb writes, the self-employed artisan can be antifragile: a weeklong earnings decline tells the taxi driver to try a new part of town, while a mistake made in the cubicle farm will be kept on the permanent record. As well, the office worker has one main employer and thus rigidity, while the taxi driver has many--giving him more options, greater flexibility to adapt to his environment."

 

Our challenge in decision intelligence: to make decisions that lead towards the antifragile parts of state space in a rapidly changing, unpredictable, and uncertain world.

Rescooped by MFaculty from Police News
Scoop.it!

Bratton named NYPD commissioner

Bratton named NYPD commissioner | Higher Education | Scoop.it
Bill Bratton, who pioneered the crime-fighting techniques that helped make New York the nation’s safest big city as its top cop two decades ago, will return to his old job under incoming mayor Bill de Blasio.

Via Law Enforcement
MFaculty's insight:

A spot of innovation...pulled from the past?

more...
Law Enforcement's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:27 PM

Scoop Courtesy of:  LP Police http://lppolice.com - "Investigative Database & Link Analysis for Law Enforcement & Government Agencies:

Rescooped by MFaculty from Police News
Scoop.it!

Mountain View Police Department’s Social Media Strategy 2.0 in the Heart of Silicon Valley

Mountain View Police Department’s Social Media Strategy 2.0 in the Heart of Silicon Valley | Higher Education | Scoop.it
California Police Chiefs Association

Via Law Enforcement
MFaculty's insight:

Without question, social media is a vital component to the law enforcement mission. Is your agency leveraging the power and influence of social media, or is it still limiting itself to traditional summaries with dated information? Consider taking a page from the MVPD and "bend technology to your will."

more...
Law Enforcement's curator insight, January 3, 2014 4:00 PM

Mountain View Police Department Scoop Courtesy of:  LP Police http://lppolice.com Law Enforcement & Government Agencies - "Catch the Bad Guys" - America's #1 Link Analysis Software

Rescooped by MFaculty from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

Free Online Grammar Check, Plagiarism, Spelling, and More

Free Online Grammar Check, Plagiarism, Spelling, and More | Higher Education | Scoop.it
Grammar, Plagiarism, and Spelling Check; Free Online Proofreading; No Downloads...Allows you to find those pesky mistakes and correct them before your teacher does...

Via Nik Peachey
MFaculty's insight:

I just 'test drove' this online application - it was very fast and accurately caught my spelling errors. As a basic tool for students, I think it is, or will be, one that they can use before they turn to the writing tutors. I don't advocate trying to replace professional writing tutors with this (or any other) online tool, but it would certainly reduce the number of common errors made in student writings.

 

Since it is a free service, I would recommend educators consider giving it a test drive in their writing courses to determine whether or not any value is added in doing so. While there are plenty of word processing tools avialble for students to use in order to hone in on their writing, this one is free and seems to adequately, and quickly, perform the basics.

 

Not really an endorsement, as much as a recommendation for other to consider testing for themselves.

more...
ella88's curator insight, January 29, 2014 5:09 PM

Many studies have addressed the issue of identifying the different dimensions of culture. In the presentations concerning culture by Madlin Reck and Anne Tornow the ways in which national culture may influence management processes, including Hofstede’s dimensions of culture have been discussed extensively (Luthans & Doh, 2012).

Darlene Stark's curator insight, May 13, 2014 9:39 AM

Kirby Mack

Mrs. Stark

Desktop Publishing

4/25/14

Afghanistan and the Taliban: Before, After and Now

The Kite Runner was set in the years 1975-2001. Everything during these years went from being peaceful, to bad, to even worse. The Taliban during these fateful years have taken control of Afghanistan and its government. They were thought of as heroes to the people of their once peaceful country, but their way of controlling their government is sadistic. In the present, they are even involved in the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center.

During 1975, Afghanistan was a quiet place to live. There were economic hardships, but the residents of this pleasant country got through it. Kabul is the capital city of Afghanistan. It had the most economy problems in the country. Most of them were poverty difficulties. The president of this country at the time was Daoud Khan. Then, when winter came along, resistance towards communists began. Amir from The Kite Runner even knew of these communist attempts to rule his country. “Huddled together in the dining room and waiting for the sun to rise, none of us had any notion that a way of life had ended.” (Hosseini 36). The Afghan Islamist part of the resistance was favored by Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and the United States instead of the Afghan traditionalist and royalist parts. The uprising has just begun for the communist takeover in Afghanistan.

In 1979, the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan. Even Amir from The Kite Runner even knew about this before it all happened. “And then in December 1979, when Russian tanks would roll into the very same streets where Hassan and I played, bringing the death of the Afghanistan I knew”(Hosseini 36) The Taliban during this time were thought of as refugees and were part of a resistance movement to expel the Russian troops from their country. The United States and Pakistan provided financial and military support so the Afghans could win against the Soviet soldiers. Despite the fact that there were civilians in Kabul, the Afghans did not care and used missiles, provided by the United States, to drop on the city resulting in civilian casualties and killed Soviet troops. In 1989, Ahmed Shah Massoud, took over Kabul as new leader. They ended up overthrowing President Sayid Mohammed Najibullah, who headed the Afghan government. In 1994, the Taliban were more powerful because Pakistan favored them and did everything in their power to support them. “Pakistan support for the Taliban is based on strong religious and ethnic bonds between the Taliban and Pakistan” (Amghar, Web 6). The militants of the Taliban are Sunni Muslim Pashtuns. They are thirteen percent of Pakistan’s population. They are basically most of the Taliban in general.

In 1996, Osama Bin Laden moved from Sudan to Afghanistan and met with Mullah Mohammed Omar, the Taliban’s leader. “Bin Laden was involved in the bombing of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998” (Amghar, Web 6). On September 11th, 2001, Bin laden prompted the bombing of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. This resulted in the United States asking the Taliban to immediately hand over Bin Laden. General Pervez Musharraf, president of Pakistan, told the U.S. that he would support the capturing of Bin Laden. Instead, they couldn’t take down Bin Laden and Al Qaeda because of the ethnic and religious ties with the Taliban. Basically, Pakistan let the Taliban do what like to the people in there cites by robbing them and raping women. “The Taliban were exceedingly ignorant, which made them cruel” (Arbabzadah, Web 1). The Taliban used to be heroes to the people of the country, but now they are just plain evil. In The Kite Runner, Amir’s friend Farid said the Taliban would look for any excuse for violence. Amir bought a fake beard because it is considered a sin to shave and that all men should have beards. He saw Kabul during this time and was unfamiliar with it as it is not how it used to be when he was a kid. Afghanistan is just plagued by the Taliban with no hope for escape.

 

 In conclusion, the Taliban before, after, and now are a deadly force to reckon with. I have to say that religion has a strong connection with them as they think of most things as sins. Amir from The Kite Runner depicts Afghanistan as a peaceful state. Now, he thinks of it as a wasteland that is ruled by a stubborn government with a false sense of religion. In my opinion, as much as I hate the Taliban, they must be removed from Afghanistan and Pakistan because they can cause a lot of trouble for those countries and can stir up many civil wars within those countries.

 

 

Works Cited

Amghar, Adderrahim. "Home." The Resurgence of the Taliban in Pakistan. Nazareth College, 2014. Web. 01 May 2014.

Arbabzadah, Nushin. "The 1980s Mujahideen, the Taliban and the Shifting Idea of Jihad." Theguardian.com. Guardian News and Media, 28 Apr. 2011. Web. 01 May 2014.

Bai, Laxmi. "Security Research Review." : Volume 1(3) Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Afghanistan. Bharat-Rakshak, 2005. Web. 01 May 2014.

Hosseini, Khaled. The Kite Runner. New York: Riverhead, 2003.

 

Melissa Hanson's curator insight, June 18, 8:54 PM

Carol:

Writing Standards 6-12 (Research to Build and Present Knowledge No. 8)

A teacher cannot reinforce the seriousness of plagiarism and following standard format for citations to students.  Having a tool that can assist in checking plagiarism issues would help eliminate this mistake.  Plagiarism takes a large role for any student, especially those continuing on in a higher educational institution.

 

Scooped by MFaculty
Scoop.it!

High Performing Predictive Analytics with R and Hadoop

High Performing Predictive Analytics with R and Hadoop | Higher Education | Scoop.it

I'm a bit late catching up on this, but Mario Inchosa (Revolution Analytics US Chief Scientist) gave a standing-room-only talk on high-performance predictive analytics in R and Hadoop at last month's Hadoop Summit. In the talk, he described some of the progress we've made integrating the ScaleR parallel external-memory algorithms into the Hadoop platform. 

more...
Rescooped by MFaculty from Business & IT
Scoop.it!

Can you predict crime with tech?

Can you predict crime with tech? | Higher Education | Scoop.it
Software predicts the areas at greater risk of crime - to increase police patrols and prevent a criminal act.

 

Want to catch a criminal? Prevent a crime? Technology may help - by predicting where crimes might occur.

 

A police officer glances at a screen displaying a city map - and one area suddenly starts flashing red.

 

Seconds later, the department receives data about an assault that is likely to happen there in the next few hours.

 

Patrols get deployed - just in time to stop the crime from happening. No-one gets hurt.

 

It might sound like a scenario straight out of the science-fiction film Minority Report, but predictive analytics technology to fight crime already exists

.

Researchers are working on software that tries to determine which city areas are prone to crime.

 

The computer program analyses police activities, aggregating huge amounts of information, from past and present crime records to real-time data from police patrols.

 

It then dots a city map with zones where an offence is likely to occur, even detailing the possible nature of future crimes.

 

There have been a number of predictive crime mapping pilot projects in Britain and the United States, and chief constable Mike Barton from the UK Association of Chief Police Officers calls them "the next generation of intelligence-led policing".

 

"[Such] technology can help us to anticipate where crime will occur, and in particular, where it is displaced as a result of police activity," he says.

 

"This has clear benefits when it comes to directing resources effectively and in reducing repeat victimisation."

'Hotspots'


One predictive analytics developer is electronics giant IBM.

 

At a recent conference at the company's lab near Winchester in the UK, the firm suggested that over the past seven years its technology had helped reduce crime in Memphis, Tennessee, by more than 30%.

"The software helps police to recognise patterns and determine a city's criminal 'hotspots' - to then patrol them more than others, deploy traffic enforcement and launch targeted operations," says IBM's Ron Fellows.

 

Besides Memphis, the technology is also being used in several other cities in the UK and US.

 

Another company working on predictive analytics is start-up PredPol, based in Los Angeles, California.

 

Its software has been tested by the Los Angeles Police Department since 2011. Again, the firm claims impressive results.

 

UK privacy and civil liberties campaign group Big Brother Watch welcomes the predictive analytics technology.

 

"This kind of approach, using crime data and pursuing the 'broken windows' strategy, is far more effective at reducing crime and improving public safety... than the Home Office's current proposal to trawl everyone's communications and hope you get lucky," says Nick Pickles, the organisation's director.

 

"Sadly in Britain we've spent hundreds of millions of pounds on CCTV cameras despite the evidence showing it is a largely ineffective way of cutting crime and in too many towns there are cameras on every corner but people rarely see a police officer."


Via IDG Connect
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MFaculty from Surveillance Studies
Scoop.it!

The surveillance of ‘prolific’ offenders: Beyond ‘docile bodies’ - Punishment & Society

The surveillance of ‘prolific’ offenders: Beyond ‘docile bodies’

Michael McCahill and Rachel L Finn

Abstract

This article uses ethnographic research to explore how a sample of state-defined ‘prolific’ offenders living in Northern City (a small city in the North of England) experience and respond to a surveillance regime which includes ‘appointments’, ‘tracking’, ‘interviews’, ‘drug testing’, ‘electronic monitoring’, ‘home visits’ and ‘intelligence-led policing’. While some writers have argued that the experience of ‘house arrest’ and electronic monitoring is consistent with ‘disciplinary power’ and the ‘self-governing capabilities’ identified by Foucault, our article interweaves surveillance theory with the work of Pierre Bourdieu to argue that the ‘surveilled’ are a group of creative ‘social actors’ who may negotiate, modify, evade or contest surveillance practices.

 

 


Via Richard Evans
more...
No comment yet.