EDMT5534 Change and Continuity
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Refugees and migration | Words to unite us | 2—Activities for Whoever You Are

Chris Manning's insight:

Whoever You Are is an excellent book to use for children in early stage 1 (ES1) to explore family origins, including country of origin, because it introduces a global perspective of children who live in different parts of the world (Fox, 1998). It is a beautifully illustrated picture book that depicts some of the differences between children around the world, such as their skin colour, the language they speak, the type of house they live in, the school they attend.  The majority of the book then proceeds to highlight the similarities between children, their feelings of love, joy, laughter, and sadness. The teacher could adapt some of the activities on this site to be more age-appropriate.

 

The teacher can lead a discussion with the students asking them to explain what they see on the cover, what they think the story might be about, and to comment on the illustrations throughout the book.

Having the children sit in a circle, the teacher could then explain the importance of a symbol as a shape or sign that represents something.  Students would then be asked to select symbols in the story like the globe. The teacher would then explain that a circle is an ancient symbol of unity.

 

The teacher and class would then make a list of similarities and differences based on questions answered by students on their own likes/dislikes (e.g. food), the type of house/apartment they live in, if they were born in Australia or another country, if their parents or grandparents were born in another country, if they speak another language other than English (Becky, 2012, para. 3). This will then tie back to demonstrating their own heritage and the heritage of others (CCES1).

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Maths with the Mob — Learning Sequence 1

Maths with the Mob — Learning Sequence 1 | EDMT5534 Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
Chris Manning's insight:

This resource allows teachers to introduce Aboriginal culture to children and integrate Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) content with other key learning areas such as mathematics and English. For early stage 1 (ES1) students learning about family origins, the alphanumeric picture book A is for Aunty by Aboriginal author Elaine Russell, provides an insight into her childhood and family life (Russell, 2000). Using learning sequence 1 activities, teachers would use the letter ‘A’ and ‘U’ from the book to discuss with the class the meaning of ‘Aunty’ and ‘Uncle’ in Aboriginal communities and also the meaning of ‘mob’ by Aboriginal people to describe family.

 

The teacher would then draw up a list with the students and compare and contrast their own lives to the author’s childhood and family life. The students would then draw their extended family and people who live at home with them. This will allow students to describe events or retell stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others (CCES1).

 

To integrate mathematics (modelling positional language), the teacher would select the letter ‘E’ and prepare an overhead transparency of the outline of the illustration, asking students to place counters on the overhead projector based on where they think the position of characters and animals belong in the picture.

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We Are Family, Grades K–1 | Scholastic.com

We Are Family, Grades K–1 | Scholastic.com | EDMT5534 Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
Activities, reproducibles, and tips for teaching kids K-1 about families. Includes
Chris Manning's insight:

There are a couple of different teaching ideas from this resource to introduce students in ES1 learning about their family of origin, including their country of origin. The first activity is called Families on Display. This involves the teacher collecting and creating a collage of pictures of different types of family groups, from divergent cultures, and origins. The children are then asked to add photos and drawings of their own families or important people in their life to the display.

 

The second activity is called Meeting Ancestors. The lesson begins by the teacher reading a book called Watch the Stars Come Out (Levinson, 1999). This story is about a grandmother telling her granddaughter about a pair of children who immigrate to America. There is a pdf on this site called Where We’ve Been that can be sent home to families asking for information about their heritage. The teacher will gather the information and create ‘Our Map of Family Places’ by helping the children place pins into a large wall map of the world showing their families’ places of origin and patterns of movement. The teacher then connects the pins with string and labels the places and dates the movements. The teacher will then make a list of the important places and over the school term help the children find information about those places.

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Index of /primary/hsie/assets/pdf

Chris Manning's insight:

Please scroll down to the second last entry and click on the treasures.pdf. Using lesson plan 9 and the worksheets 2, 3, 9 and the CD-ROM from the unit Treasures, students in ES1 will learn about their family origins, including their country of origin, therefore demonstrating their heritage and the heritage of others (CCES1).  As part of homework, the student should be requested to complete worksheet 9 with the assistance of a family member.

 

To introduce the students to the concept of an oral history, a guest speaker, such as a grandparent of a student, will be asked to give a discussion to the class about some of their favourite items and explain the story behind each item. The students will then visit Inkle and find out what her favourite things are on the Treasures CD-ROM.

 

The teacher will then read to the class Isabella’s bed by Alison Lester, students will be asked to identify items that were kept by the major character and explain why they were kept. Students are then asked to bring in one of their favourite items, and in groups of two share their stories about the items with each other. Students are encouraged to ask questions of each other about the what, how, when, why of each item.  The students will then write a story about their item and display their story and the item to create an exhibition. Finally, the students will revisit the Treasures CD-ROM and compare what is in Inkle’s treasure chest compared to what was found in the story Isabella’s bed.

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Lesson Plan - A mini-unit for teaching students more about family

Chris Manning's insight:

To help ES1 students learn about their family origins, the teacher will help the students create a family tree. To begin this unit of work the teacher will read the story All Kinds of Families (Simon, 1976). This book depicts a variety of family types, which students may relate to in their own family life. There will be a class discussion on what makes a family. The book also discusses the passing down and retelling of family stories from generation to generation, thus introducing the student to the concept of heritage. The students will also learn how each of their family members are related.

 

Some of the activities on the site are aimed at a higher stage, so the teacher would need to modify the unit of work by providing an outline of a family tree for each student, have the students bring in pictures of their immediate family and grandparents or people who are important in their life. Students would colour in their family tree, and then cut out the pictures of their family members and glue these onto branches of the tree in allocated spots for mother, father etc. The students would trace the title of each family member under their picture. This part of the unit will help the students learn the alphabet and practice their writing. The finished family trees will be displayed in the classroom, and referred to in other exercises. There is an example of a letter which can be sent home to the parents or guardians of the students asking for their assistance in gathering the information, the parents will be asked to label the photos on the back, to help the teacher. 

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