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Bosses and Leaders

Bosses and Leaders | EdLead | Scoop.it
Of bosses and leaders.
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Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment

Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment | EdLead | Scoop.it
Giving feedback that is non-evaluative, specific, timely, and goal-related will provide students with opportunities to revise and improve their work and deepen their understanding.
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This Teacher Taught His Class A Powerful Lesson About Privilege

This Teacher Taught His Class A Powerful Lesson About Privilege | EdLead | Scoop.it
With a recycling bin and some scrap paper.
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A New iPadagogy Wheel

A New iPadagogy Wheel | EdLead | Scoop.it
Downloads:  Interactive PDF Version      Image File (PNG) I was introduced to Dr. Allan Carrington's Padagody Wheel (aka SAMR Wheel) last fall and immediately started using this amazing tool in pro...

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David Swaddle's curator insight, October 29, 2014 6:53 PM

Interesting to me as a collection of modern tools and how they might be used in relation to Bloom's taxonomy.

niftyjock's curator insight, November 1, 2014 7:10 PM

The spinning wheel of pedagogy, where it lands nobody knows

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Your Rubric Is a Hot Mess; Here’s How to Fix It.

Your Rubric Is a Hot Mess; Here’s How to Fix It. | EdLead | Scoop.it
Instead of listing all the different ways a task deviates from the target, the single-point rubric simply describes the target in a single column of traits.
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The Only Time Of Day Kids Think Parents Will Put Down Their Cell Phones

The Only Time Of Day Kids Think Parents Will Put Down Their Cell Phones | EdLead | Scoop.it
Despite studies that prove unplugging and spending time without your cell phone is beneficial for a number of reasons, parents know it is easier said than done. Unfortunately, children are noticing.

According to Hightlight's annual "State of...
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The 4-Step Guide To Critical Thinking Skills - Chart/Infographic

The 4-Step Guide To Critical Thinking Skills - Chart/Infographic | EdLead | Scoop.it
Here is a guide to critical thinking skills complete with four (count 'em, 4!) steps accompanied by fill-in-the-blank questions designed to pique your interest and illustrate how each step works.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 13, 2014 7:42 AM

I think creating your own content and questions needed to do this should have been on this chart. Good chart though.

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The Best Leaders Are Insatiable Learners

The Best Leaders Are Insatiable Learners | EdLead | Scoop.it
You have no excuse for being bored.
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Rashmi Rawat's curator insight, October 22, 2014 1:38 AM

But ,you can  give reasons why you are bored ?

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How to escape education's death valley

How to escape education's death valley | EdLead | Scoop.it
Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.
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On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes

On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes | EdLead | Scoop.it
Scientists have come a long way in understanding how the brain generates creative ideas. Their work can inform classroom structures if educators want to inspire more creativity in students.
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Teaching Questioning Skills to Arm Students for Learning

Teaching Questioning Skills to Arm Students for Learning | EdLead | Scoop.it
Who holds the power in your classroom? Often the person asking the questions is the person in charge. Why not empower students to ask the questions that suit what they want to know?
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What Meaningful Reflection On Student Work Can Do for Learning

Reflecting on one's work can be instrumental to growth and improvement, but it's an activity that's often under utilized.
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Daphne Koller: What we're learning from online education - YouTube

Daphne Koller: What we're learning from online education - YouTube | EdLead | Scoop.it
Daphne Koller is enticing top universities to put their most intriguing courses online for free -- not just as a service, but as a way to research how people...
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Teacher spends two days as a student and is shocked at what she learns

Teacher spends two days as a student and is shocked at what she learns | EdLead | Scoop.it
'Teachers work hard, but I now think that conscientious students work harder. '
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rthibert's curator insight, October 29, 2014 9:15 AM

Un prof se met à la place des élèves pdt 2 jours : retour d'expérience, susceptible de modifier sa façon de travailler

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The Illustrated Guide To A Ph.D.

The Illustrated Guide To A Ph.D. | EdLead | Scoop.it
A Ph.D. is hard to describe it in words. So, here it is in pictures.
Rajesh Kripalani's insight:

Personal and Shared Knowledge. 

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Homework: An unnecessary evil? … Surprising findings from new research

Homework: An unnecessary evil? … Surprising findings from new research | EdLead | Scoop.it
A new study on the academic effects of homework offers not only some intriguing results but also a lesson on how to read a study -- and a reminder of the importance of doing just that: reading studies (carefully) rather than relying on summaries by journalists or even by the researchers themselves. Alfie Kohn explains.
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Why Daydreaming is Critical to Effective Learning

Why Daydreaming is Critical to Effective Learning | EdLead | Scoop.it
Daydreaming and playing are crucial to develop the kind of creativity many say should be a focal point of a modern education system.
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Educational Leadership:Instruction That Sticks:Strategies That Make Learning Last

Educational Leadership:Instruction That Sticks:Strategies That Make Learning Last | EdLead | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner. Our 175,000 members in 119 countries are professional educators from all levels and subject areas––superintendents, supervisors, principals, teachers, professors of education, and school board members.
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WHAT is outstanding teaching and learning? (1428x2014 pixels)

WHAT is outstanding teaching and learning? (1428x2014 pixels) | EdLead | Scoop.it

A MUST READ!

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=mindset

 

 


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 6, 2014 11:12 AM

The feedback point is interesting. It is about information given to students relative to their learning goals. Feedback also means feedback for the teacher. What do we mean by student goals? What does this mean in relationship to curricula-as-plans. It suggests that teaching and learning are part of complex conversations (Pinar) and that the curricula-as-lived (Aoki) are important considerations.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Mark Gittos's curator insight, September 8, 2014 2:56 AM

Very interesting

Educate Massachusetts's curator insight, September 8, 2014 9:27 AM

Organized, clear and easy to read this infographic has important reminders for all of us in the profession of education.

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Flipping the Staff Meeting

Flipping the Staff Meeting | EdLead | Scoop.it
Educational leaders, I have an important announcement for you! (You’ll get the joke later). We are always pressed for time. Many of us do not have collaborative planning time, or if we do, it is limited. There is never enough time, and so we have to be creative, both in creating space for work and in changing how we would normally spend our time. The staff meeting is one place where we can be creative with time and refine it to meet our professional learning goals. Here are some things you might do to restructure and “flip” the staff meeting. Quit the Announcements - You know what gets old at a staff meeting? Announcements. At every staff meeting, I was always frustrated when we spent 15–20 minutes going over logistics and making announcements. You can record these announcements, create a document, or send an e-mail and spend the time asking clarifying questions instead. This way, you can save time for better work; work that teachers will find more meaningful. Teacher Led PD – Based on needs assessments of teachers, we create targeted professional learning activities. Frankly, we don’t need to do this creation ourselves. Our teachers have great ideas, and we can ask them to share these ideas that are aligned to faculty and staff needs. We can co-create professional learning sessions. Build your teacher leaders and have them model great instruction by leading focused professional learning. Ongoing Protocols – Discussions can sometimes get out of hand. We are educators, and often we love to talk…and talk…and talk. I’m guilty of this as much as the next teacher. Let’s honor the talk, but also focus it. Choose professional learning protocols to use in staff meetings. Perhaps it's a critique protocol or looking at student work protocol. Regardless, your staff meeting can now become a time where revision and reflection occur, and student learning is the focus of the time. These are just three ideas you might use to start flipping your staff meeting. It can be a valuable time for professional learning, but only if we are creative with that time and shed some of the “traditional” ways they have been used. How do you foresee flipping your classroom for the upcoming year?   Andrew K. Miller (@betamiller on Twitter) is on the National Faculty  for the Buck Institute for Education, an organization specializing in 21st century project-based learning, and faculty for ASCD, providing expertise in a variety of professional development needs. He is also a regular blogger for Edutopia.
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Establishing A Culture Of “Can” In Your Classroom

Establishing A Culture Of “Can” In Your Classroom | EdLead | Scoop.it

"The long-term output of any school should be not just proficient students, but enabled learners. An “enabled” learner can grasp macro views, uncover micro details, ask questions, plan for new knowledge and transfer thinking across divergent circumstances. This doesn’t happen by content “knowledge holding,” or even by the fire of enthusiasm, but by setting a tone for learning that suggests possibility, and by creating a culture of can."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 4, 2014 9:35 PM

One of my favorite videos on growth mindset is Carol Dweck sharing the word yet, specifically where she says that if a student says "I can't do that" she says to tell the student to say "I can't do that yet." To me that is a way to shift the culture of the classroom, where students learn that as time goes on what they are able to do things they could not before.

This post explores this culture of "can", sharing ideas on how you might move your classroom to reach this culture. Three areas are discussed.

1. Use the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model

This is a model that many of us may already use. The post describes it as "show me, help me, let me." In my school we talk about "I do, we do, you do."

2. Intentionally Use the Individual Student as a Culture-Maker

This requires that we find the time as we teach to "honor the contribution of others," specifically our students. Culture does not grow from a top down approach.

3. Diverse — and Authentic — Terms for Success

Creating a classroom that is learner centered, where students also have input to help create authentic learning.

More information on these concepts are in the post.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, August 5, 2014 11:36 AM

Love the ideas here and realize the challenge of the mission. Our kids need to embrace their mistakes as learning opportunities rather than expect immediate mastery and feedback with praise.  i am thinking of making a classroom poster ( or posters) with the Word "YET" in giant letters and use that as our mantra.

Marisol Araya Fonseca's curator insight, August 18, 2014 2:04 PM

Yes!!! Mine is:  You can do it!!!