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John Hattie's Eight Mind Frames For Teachers

John Hattie's Eight Mind Frames For Teachers | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

In Visible Learning for Teachers (p. 159 ff) John Hattie claims that “the major argument in this book underlying powerful impacts in our schools relates to how we think! It is a set of mind frames that underpin our every action and decision in a school; it is a belief that we are evaluators, change agents, adaptive learning experts, seekers of feedback about our impact, engaged in dialogue and challenge, and developers of trust with all, and that we see opportunity in error, and are keen to spread the message about the power, fun, and impact that we have on learning.”
John Hattie believes “that teachers and school leaders who develop these ways of thinking are more likely to have major impacts on student learning.”

During the summer holidays we stumbled upon a great video made by Cheryl Reynolds, a senior lecturer at the University of Huddersfield. She has put together John Hattie’s eight mind frames in a very nice and fun video scribe animation. This is a great back-to-school inspiration for all teachers who want to know and improve their impact on student learning. Watch the video and spread the message!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xpcXobZF1k

 


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Research shows that the number one factor that impacts student achievement is a highly effective teacher in the classroom.  Hattie's 8 Mind Frames create a template for teachers to grow as professionals and have meaningful impact on their students. 

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Advancing STEM Education with GIS ebook Released | GIS Education Community

Advancing STEM Education with GIS ebook Released | GIS Education Community | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education is a multidisciplinary approach to improving education, the work force, and national competitiveness. President Barack Obama
noted that “Strengthening STEM education is vital to preparing our students to compete in the twenty-first century economy, and we need to recruit and train math and science teachers to support our nation’s students.” (White House Press Release, September 27, 2010).


Geographic information system (GIS) technology can engage several critical elements in STEM curriculum and instruction. GIS tools and techniques lead to understanding cross-disciplinary phenomena and solving problems rooted in academic and real world concepts. People use GIS to make maps, analyze data, and decide on best solutions. From a curricular perspective, GIS allows us to study climate change, design cities, inventory geologic samples, plan ecological growth models, catalog contents of an archaeological site, and countless other activities. GIS and related geospatial technologies of global positioning systems (GPS) and remote sensing can be used to simultaneously engage students in science, technology, engineering, and math.


To support the ever growing interest in GIS and STEM from teachers, researchers, and administrators, Esri has released a new (free) ebook addressing the multi-faceted supports GIS offers STEM classrooms. Dr. Tom Baker begins the ebook by addressing the core question, “How does GIS enhance STEM learning?” The ebook is filled with rich case studies of STEM in formal and informal environments. The power of STEM collaborations and partnerships and ties to career and workforce development is also a central theme of the volume. The ebook outlines three beneficial tracks for student learning in STEM by integrating GIS technology:


Click headline to read more and access hot link to download ebook--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Follow the link to download the book that connects geographic information systems, GPS, and STEM.

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Students & Teachers Explain Benefits of MinecraftEDU | Wesley Fryer | Speed of Creativity

Students & Teachers Explain Benefits of MinecraftEDU | Wesley Fryer | Speed of Creativity | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Thanks to this post last week by Joel Soloman (@mole555) in the “Minecraft Teachers Google Group” I saw this excellent 7.5 minute video featuring interviews with both students and teachers, explaining the benefits of using MinecraftEDU in school. Check it out!


This week I am introducing my STEM students to MinecraftEDU in a two part lesson, so this is timely. I’ve added it to my main MinecraftEDU STEM curriculum resource page.


Click headline to watch the video and read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Elementary and middle school students already love Minecraft, so Minecraft EDU is a natural extension to take the passion further. 

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Julia Hoffman's curator insight, January 25, 2015 10:32 PM

What student wouldn't want to interact with Minecraft??? This is a program I hear so much about from my students. This edu version uses the Minecraft premise and adapts it into curriculum/social objectives. It's a win-win!

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Tynker- A Wonderful App for Teaching Students Coding and Programming Skills ~ EdTech and MLearning

Tynker- A Wonderful App for Teaching Students Coding and Programming Skills ~ EdTech and MLearning | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Tynker is an excellent website for teaching students coding. Students will get to learn the fundamentals of coding and programming through game-like puzzles, tutorials, stories and several interactive activities. Tynker also provides a wide variety of educational resources for teachers and educators.  Some of these include: ready-to-use , grade specific lesson plans,  STEM project templates that integrate coding across the curriculum, automatic assessment and powerful tracking tools for a better classroom management and many more.

Via John Evans
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Coding is a good place to start building student interest in STEM.

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Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science | National Center for Women & Information Technology

Moving Beyond Computer Literacy: Why schools should teach computer science | National Center for Women & Information Technology | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Computer Science — not computer literacy — underlies most innovation today, yet the majority of U.S. schools require only that students use computers. Computer science teaches students design, logical reasoning, and problem solving — all valuable well beyond the computer science classroom.


Via Norman Morgan
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Many students understand how to use technology, but do they understand how it works? 

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FORBES - MOOCs Aim To Strengthen Computer Science And Physics Teaching In Middle And High Schools

FORBES - MOOCs Aim To Strengthen Computer Science And Physics Teaching In Middle And High Schools | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
To help fill this gap in K–12 STEM education, Harvey Mudd created its first MOOC for middle and high school teachers. Middle Years Computer Science (MyCS) walks a teacher through the lesson plans, activities and exercises of a curriculum developed to appeal to students with a broad range of interests and no prior CS experience. Schools that have been using it have found it to be easy to use, accessible and engaging for their students.

Our second MOOC offering, How Stuff Moves, supports students in their first course in calculus-based physics, a fundamental building block to further physics study in college. The course provides lectures, demonstrations, problem sets, worked solutions to every practice problem and concept tests— a wealth of resources to help students master the material, whether they are considering taking a high school AP physics course or their first mechanics course in college.

Via John Evans
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

MOOCS make their way from college and high school down to middle school.

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Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing? | National Academies Press

Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing? | National Academies Press | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Following a 2011 report by the National Research Council (NRC) on successful K-12 education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), Congress asked the National Science Foundation to identify methods for tracking progress toward the report's recommendations. In response, the NRC convened the Committee on an Evaluation Framework for Successful K-12 STEM Education to take on this assignment. The committee developed 14 indicators linked to the 2011 report's recommendations. By providing a focused set of key indicators related to students' access to quality learning, educator's capacity, and policy and funding initiatives in STEM, the committee addresses the need for research and data that can be used to monitor progress in K-12 STEM education and make informed decisions about improving it.


The recommended indicators provide a framework for Congress and relevant deferral agencies to create and implement a national-level monitoring and reporting system that: assesses progress toward key improvements recommended by a previous National Research Council (2011) committee; measures student knowledge, interest, and participation in the STEM disciplines and STEM-related activities; tracks financial, human capital, and material investments in K-12 STEM education at the federal, state, and local levels; provides information about the capabilities of the STEM education workforce, including teachers and principals; and facilitates strategic planning for federal investments in STEM education and workforce development when used with labor force projections. All 14 indicators explained in this report are intended to form the core of this system. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing? summarizes the 14 indicators and tracks progress towards the initial report's recommendations.

 

Click headline to access website to hot link to read online or order a copy--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

This report makes recommendations for a nationwide monitoring and reporting system for STEM integration.

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Guest opinion: Investing in STEM is vital to Washington's economic future | Patrick D'Amelio | Seattle Times

Guest opinion: Investing in STEM is vital to Washington's economic future | Patrick D'Amelio | Seattle Times | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Washington is a leader in the concentration of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) jobs. However, our education system is facing challenges to keep up with the demand to produce a diverse and world class workforce.

 

According to the Boston Consulting Group’s (BCG) report Opportunity for All: Investing in Washington State’s STEM Education Pipeline, only 40 percent of high school students in Washington graduate with competency in STEM topics that are critical for the state’s economy.

Washington lawmakers must strengthen the STEM pipeline from cradle to career. According to a recent poll commissioned by Washington STEM, they have overwhelming public support to do just that. A bipartisan group of legislators have proposed four pieces of legislation to help give students a high-quality STEM education.

In our poll, more than 70 percent of Washington voters said they support improving early learning programs to help improve STEM. Rep. Ruth Kagi is the prime sponsor of House Bill 1491, and Sen. Steve Litzow is championing its companion bill, Senate Bill 5452, to create The Early Start Act to improve the quality of Washington’s childcare and preschools. Research shows early math skills are the best predictor of future academic success. Introducing our youngest students to STEM will set them up for a lifetime of opportunity, success, and interest in STEM.

Teachers are the most important factor in student achievement. House Bill 1345, as passed by the House 91-7, sponsored by Reps. Kristine Lytton, Chad Magendanz and Steve Bergquist, would adopt a statewide definition of teacher professional development; this will help drive the millions spent annually on teacher professional development to better outcomes for teachers and students. Supporting teachers helps students succeed.

Along with great teachers, schools need state-of-the-art classroom environments to help students actively engage in STEM. More than 80 percent of Washington voters support legislation like the K-12 STEM Capital Grants Program, included in the House and Senate budgets, to fund necessary improvements in aging schools.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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This author highlights the need to support STEM from cradle to career financially through professional development and state of the art resources for teaching and learning.

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STEM Integration in K-12 Education - YouTube

What is STEM? It's the acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. But while kindergarten through 12th grade education usually focuses on s...
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

This u-tube video highlights the importance for integrating S, T, E, and M so that students see STEM fields as relevant.

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Why America’s obsession with STEM education is dangerous | Fareed Zakaria Opinion | WashPost.com

Why America’s obsession with STEM education is dangerous | Fareed Zakaria Opinion | WashPost.com | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

If Americans are united in any conviction these days, it is that we urgently need to shift the country’s education toward the teaching of specific, technical skills. Every month, it seems, we hear about our children’s bad test scores in math and science – and about new initiatives from companies, universities or foundations to expand STEM courses (science, technology, engineering and math) and deemphasize the humanities.

 

From President Obama on down, public officials have cautioned against pursuing degrees like art history, which are seen as expensive luxuries in today’s world. Republicans want to go several steps further and defund these kinds of majors. “Is it a vital interest of the state to have more anthropologists?” asked Florida’s Gov. Rick Scott. “I don’t think so.”

 

America’s last bipartisan cause is this: A liberal education is irrelevant, and technical training is the new path forward. It is the only way, we are told, to ensure that Americans survive in an age defined by technology and shaped by global competition. The stakes could not be higher.

This dismissal of broad-based learning, however, comes from a fundamental misreading of the facts — and puts America on a dangerously narrow path for the future. The United States has led the world in economic dynamism, innovation and entrepreneurship thanks to exactly the kind of teaching we are now told to defenestrate.

 

A broad general education helps foster critical thinking and creativity. Exposure to a variety of fields produces synergy and cross fertilization. Yes, science and technology are crucial components of this education, but so are English and philosophy.

 

When unveiling a new edition of the iPad, Steve Jobs explained that “it’s in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough — that it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our hearts sing.”

Innovation is not simply a technical matter but rather one of understanding how people and societies work, what they need and want. America will not dominate the 21st century by making cheaper computer chips but instead by constantly reimagining how computers and other new technologies interact with human beings.

For most of its history, the United States was unique in offering a well-rounded education. In their comprehensive study, “The Race Between Education and Technology,” Harvard’s Claudia Goldin and Lawrence Katz point out that in the 19th century, countries like Britain, France and Germany educated only a few and put them through narrow programs designed to impart only the skills crucial to their professions.

 

America, by contrast, provided mass general education because people were not rooted in specific locations with long-established trades that offered the only paths forward for young men. And the American economy has historically changed so quickly that the nature of work and the requirements for success have tended to shift from one generation to the next. People don’t want to lock themselves into one professional guild or learn one specific skill for life.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

STEM education cannot come at the expense of other interests and occupations.  Otherwise we run the risk of the industrial age where we trained everyone to work on factory assembly lines and then we mechanized the jobs.

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Joe Coberly's curator insight, April 7, 2015 5:01 PM

Is today's focus on STEM education detrimental to future innovation?

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How to Lead Professional Development for Makerspace and STEM Educators

How to Lead Professional Development for Makerspace and STEM Educators | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
 President Obama announced the “Week of Making” the week of June 12 – 18, 2015, and eleven educators from the Pittsburgh region were invited to the White House on June 15, 2015 to discuss what great makerspaces look like in schools and how we can scale this movement across the country in schools. Bu

Via basil60
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

The Week of Making needs to occur when more schools are in session, not in June.  This needs to be a national priority.

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Public Broadcasting Interactive Resources & Educational Projects

Public Broadcasting Interactive Resources & Educational Projects | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

"...the best of public media’s interactive resources and educational projects for use with middle school and high school students, multimedia productions created by youth, and professional development videos for educators. The 800+ resources featured here are designed to bring educational content to life in engaging and innovative ways, and include games, activities, quizzes, quests, and other interactive experiences."


Via Beth Dichter
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

When educators think PBS, they think early childhood education.  There are tons of resources, however, geared toward secondary students.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 10, 2013 11:05 PM

Great resources brought to you by the Public Broadcasting Corporation! Sections include the arts, careers, ELL, health and sport, language arts, math, media production, science and engineering and social studies.

Pegi Flynt, Ed.D.'s curator insight, October 12, 2014 6:25 PM

Review for inservice Language Arts Methods

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The Big List of Educational Grants and Resources | Edutopia.org

The Big List of Educational Grants and Resources | Edutopia.org | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Get a roundup of educational grants, contests, awards, free toolkits, and classroom guides aimed at helping students, classrooms, schools, and communities.

Resources by Topic:GrantsContests and AwardsClassroom Resources


Check this page weekly to get the latest updates!


Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

This is a page every teacher and grant writer should have bookmarked. 

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Vikki Coleman's curator insight, August 4, 2016 1:59 AM
Because funding is limited, it helps to know what other resources are available.
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Attracting and Teaching International Student in an Interactive World: Can We Adapt? | IntEad.com

Attracting and Teaching International Student in an Interactive World: Can We Adapt? | IntEad.com | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Innovators in education are using technology to produce better educational outcomes. Another set of innovators in academia are using technology to differentiate higher education program offerings and stand out in the global marketplace.

We will share a range of innovation trends in pedagogy with you today. Ever since we traveled to Australia last year for our last ebook on agent management, we have been spending more time evaluating the Australian higher education market. 

Today, we are sharing a little paper published by Open Universities Australia. The shareholders are seven Australian universities and they have been offering online education for over 20 years. We find it refreshing to see the collaborative approach these universities share among themselves and also with a number of private entitites through public-private partnerships (Navitas and IDP). 

The report we reviewed, Innovating Pedagogy 2013: Exploring new forms of teaching, learning and assessment to guide educators and policy makers, covers a broad range of pedagogy innovations. This report one takes us beyond MOOCs -- which we appreciated very much.

The authors summarize the current state, estimate the impact and timeframe for innovation, and provide helpful links to additional resources. We had to limit our summary below to two of trends (the first two bold bullet points). We encourage you to download the full report which provides insights into a fascinating list of topics:

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Anytime we can get educators and policymakers on the same page with student assessment, the outcomes are hopeful.

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Building practical skills through student competitions

Building practical skills through student competitions | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
The shortage of STEM graduates is well documented, as is the gap between the skills employers expect graduates to have and those the curriculum delivers.  Respondents in the 2014 IET Skills Survey highlighted the lack of practical skills as the primary reason STEM degrees do not meet the needs of their organisation when recruiting.  So this raises the question; “how do you improve the practical skills of STEM graduates to meet the needs of industry?”One approach to address this problem is partic

Via cafonso
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Competitiion works to motivate some students, but research shows it is not as effective in motivating girls.  This may be one of the reasons that girls don't seem interested in STEM.

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Teaching with Sphero the Robot in Math, Science, and Beyond - Daily Genius

Teaching with Sphero the Robot in Math, Science, and Beyond - Daily Genius | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
As someone who primarily taught math and science when I was a classroom teacher, I associated robots, robotics curriculum, and robot apps as things that were only used in those subjects. However, this past year my school received a robot grant that provided ten robots for us from the company Sphero. Sphero emphasizes the power of play in education and has a variety of lessons that are aligned to the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards on their website. They also have a number of STEM challenges in the form pre-designed engineering projects designed for collaborative group work with students and are helpful for teachers using the robots in their classes.

Via John Evans
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

This teacher realized the power of learning through play.  This is something we start with the early childhood programs and soon forget about upon entering elementary school.

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STEM Curriculum Resources by Dr. Wesley Fryer

STEM Curriculum Resources by Dr. Wesley Fryer | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
STEM curriculum resources collected and/or created by Wesley Fryer

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Don't try to create a STEM curriculum on your own.  Start with the resources that already exist and build from there.

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How to Get Students Interested in Space (and Science, and Math, and Engineering)

How to Get Students Interested in Space (and Science, and Math, and Engineering) | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
The learning platform Alleyoop is collaborating with NASA and other institutions to get kids to consider STEM careers.

Via Norman Morgan
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Instead of developing curriculum for the classroom, Alleyoop is looking to get students interested through online browsing outside of school.

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Early STEM Education Will Lead to More Women in IT | NetworkWorld.com

Early STEM Education Will Lead to More Women in IT | NetworkWorld.com | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

If the tech sector is to increase the number of women in its workforce, schools must develop robust, mandatory computer science programs in the K-12 education stage, according to a prominent advocate for women in tech.


"You make it an option, the girl is not going to take it. You have to make it mandatory and start it at a young age," says Ashley Gavin, curriculum director at Girls Who Code, a nonprofit working to expose more girls to computer science at a young age that has drawn support from leading tech firms such as Google, Microsoft and Intel.


"It's important to start early because, most of the fields that people go into, they have exposure before they get to college. We all study English before we get to college, we all study history and ... social studies before we get to college," Gavin says. "No one has any idea what computer science is. By the time you get to college, you develop fear of things you don't know. Therefore early exposure is really important."


Gavin, speaking at an event focused on increasing the number of women pursuing education in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math, claims that, of the job openings in those STEM fields, some 70 percent will be pegged to computer science by 2020.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Girls Who Code seeks to involve more female students in STEM topics, not through options, but through required courses.

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t.s's curator insight, December 27, 2014 6:48 AM

This deal with the issue of gender and the imbalance in the teach sector. important to every teacher- man and female

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Maine Voices: We must rethink how STEM is taught | The Portland Press Herald

Maine Voices: We must rethink how STEM is taught  | The Portland Press Herald | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

The important role science, technology, engineering and mathematics education has in catalyzing state economies and workforce readiness is generally recognized and certainly well documented. However, a critical piece of this message has gone missing: K-12 STEM education itself is overdue for a rethink.


Skills now necessary in manufacturing and the professions, new technical roles, high-tech product demands and new manufacturing technologies call for new STEM-based learning outcomes, increased STEM subject integration and diverse uses of technology that are largely absent in most STEM school subjects.


A related concern is the well-documented gap between how school STEM is learned and how STEM workers carry out their work in the everyday realities of their jobs.


Students may be graduating with the requisite clumps of subject knowledge mastered and formulas committed to memory, yet have little insight into how science, technology, engineering and mathematics come together to advance our quality of life, economic livelihood, responses to climate disruptions.


What exactly can be done to close this gap, to align school STEM and STEM in the workforce?


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Students may have the required knowledge in science, mathematics, and technology, however students are not prepared to integrate the areas in careers and authentic problem-based learning.

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STEM Integration in K-12 Education: Status, Prospects, and an Agenda for Research

STEM Integration in K-12 Education: Status, Prospects, and an Agenda for Research | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
STEM Integration in K-12 Education examines current efforts to connect the STEM disciplines in K-12 education. This report identifies and characterizes existing approaches to integrated STEM education, both in formal and after- and out-of-school settings. The report reviews the evidence for the impact of integrated approaches on various student outcomes, and it proposes a set of priority research questions to advance the understanding of integrated STEM education. STEM Integration in K-12 Education proposes a framework to provide a common perspective and vocabulary for researchers, practitioners, and others to identify, discuss, and investigate specific integrated STEM initiatives within the K-12 education system of the United States. STEM Integration in K-12 Education makes recommendations for designers of integrated STEM experiences, assessment developers, and researchers to design and document effective integrated STEM education. This report will help to further their work and improve the chances that some forms of integrated STEM education will make a positive difference in student learning and interest and other valued outcomes.
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

This publication is available free on the internet, and can support the implementation of a STEM program.

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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, July 31, 2015 10:31 AM

This publication is available free on the internet, and can support the implementation of a STEM program.

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Infographic: The Value of a STEM Education

Infographic: The Value of a STEM Education | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

"Knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and math STEM_ canbe a key to a successful future. Here's why a STEM education matters and how you can inspire students to pursue STEM careers.

80 % of the fastest growing occupations in the United States depend on mastery of mathematics and scientific knowledge and skills, but students are not currently equipped to satisfy this growing need." 


Via Beth Dichter
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Engineering is the missing piece of STEM.  Rarely do you find a focus on STEM that capitalizes on engineering.

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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, July 31, 2015 10:33 AM

Engineering is the missing piece of STEM.  Rarely do you find a focus on STEM that capitalizes on engineering.

Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, August 1, 2015 8:55 AM

A great infographic that looks as the value of a STEM education...for more on the value of educating students in science, technology, engineering and math click through to the post. You may also download the infographic as a pdf. 

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:42 AM

A great infographic that looks as the value of a STEM education...for more on the value of educating students in science, technology, engineering and math click through to the post. You may also download the infographic as a pdf. 

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NYU School of Engineering prepares for STEM training push | Ben Chapman | New York Daily News

NYU School of Engineering prepares for STEM training push | Ben Chapman | New York Daily News | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Officials at New York University’s Polytechnic School of Engineering aim to rocket the city schools into the future with an ambitious new push for science, engineering, technology and math — better known as STEM.

NYU School of Engineering is teaming up with the National Science Foundation and the city Education Department to train 500 city teachers to use robotics, lessons in cyber security and entrepreneurship in their classes.

NYU School of Engineering Dean and President Katepalli Sreenivasan said the program will reach a whopping 50,000 kids with cutting-edge lessons in STEM by 2025.

“By focusing upon teacher development, we will be able to impact so many more students than we could ever reach directly,” Sreenivasan said.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Intensive training for teachers is the first step to bring STEM into every classroom.

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Exposing every student to STEM

Exposing every student to STEM | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

"What does it mean to be STEM literate? It means understanding the fundamental concepts and approaches used in science, engineering, technology and ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

The first stem is to include integrated project-based learning in elementary schools.  It is the easiest place to start since elementary teachers teach all subjects.

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'Open Educational Resources' Promoted in U.S. Senate Proposal | Michelle Davis & Sean Cavanagh | EdWeek.org

'Open Educational Resources' Promoted in U.S. Senate Proposal | Michelle Davis & Sean Cavanagh | EdWeek.org | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Federal lawmakers want to encourage schools to consider using free, modifiable learning resources for students before investing in costly textbooks and curricula.

A move in the U.S. Senate to promote schools' use of open educational resources, if enacted by Congress and ultimately embraced by schools, could have a major impact on the development of curricula and on the companies that provide content to schools, some education experts say.

The latest Senate version of the main federal law on K-12 education includes new wording to encourage the use of open education resources—alternatives to proprietary products created by commercial companies—through grants that the Elementary and Secondary Education Act would make available to states.

"That little provision has potential for quite a large impact," said Douglas A. Levin, an Arlington, Va.-based consultant and analyst on educational technology issues. "If and when this passes, the question is whether this will be just a bureaucratic requirement or whether it will be enforced and prioritized."

The influence of such language on both schools and the education business community may ultimately depend on who is in the White House next, Mr. Levin added.

A handful of states are already pursuing and promoting the use of open educational resources, or OER, often with a focus on digital materials. But publishers and ed-tech companies are looking closely to determine how the language incorporated into the pending Senate bill to reauthorize the ESEA could affect their bottom lines.

The bipartisan amendment to the proposed Senate rewrite of the law is meant to encourage schools "to use and share open educational resources to disseminate best practices and provide an alternative to costly textbooks," Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, said in a statement to Education Week.

Sen. Hatch—whose state has taken a lead role in encouraging the use of open resources—and Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., sponsored the amendment, which was approved by a voice vote April 16. The overall bill awaits a vote of the full chamber.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Lawmakers recommend using open educational resources instead of purchasing pricy textbooks to support student learning.  For this to occur, we need a huge professional development initiative on how to be prudent consumers of the resources.  Otherwise we are in danger of having another Pintrest system with some great ideas and some tips to abandon.

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Jill Miller's curator insight, October 11, 2015 10:32 PM

Re-scooped from Chuck Sherwood. This article by Davis & Cavanaugh (2015, May 19) discusses a U.S. Senate proposal that would promote the use of OER in schools. While this is, in itself, of interest, the section on publishers' reaction to OER is particularly interesting. They note that "commercial publishers sometimes cast doubt on the quality and value of open resources" (Davis & Cavanaugh, 2015). Publishers would have a decided interest in fighting the use of OER, which are (by definition) freely available.

KaylaHeinlein's curator insight, October 25, 2015 10:50 AM

Open education resources could benefit many students.  This would be a great way to support our students in and out of the classroom. 

Alison Wiebenga's curator insight, October 25, 2015 12:47 PM

What an interesting concept.  I can only imagine the impact that this could have on k12 education.  If we could really make open educational resources a reality we would no longer be limited financially when it comes to providing educational resources.  No more worries about being able to afford this text, or coming up with differentiated resources to meet the needs of students.  Definitely something to keep an eye on.  Now, only if they could make it work in the college textbook industry as well.

Rescooped by Rebecca Wilkins from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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The Teacher’s Guide To Open Educational Resources | Edudemic

The Teacher’s Guide To Open Educational Resources | Edudemic | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
You’ve probably heard about Open Educational Resources & may have used some. The world of OERs is growing constantly, with more resources available daily.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Rebecca Wilkins's insight:

Professional development in each district should capitalize on how to incorporate free resources into instructional design.

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