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Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Common core ideas

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2013 12:05 PM

The recently revised Geography for Life standards have been aligned to show how geographic skills can be taught within the Common Core framework.  The National Geographic Society, in cooperation with the National Council for Geographic Education and the Network of Alliances for Geographic Education created Connections to be that link (for grade specific Common Core/Geography resources click here). 


So how is this to be done? This storymap shows ten great examples of maps that can be used as reading documents, one for each of the 10 ELA Reading Standards. 


TagsmappingEnglish, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Duke No Limit's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:53 PM

wow very interesting

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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Toronto at Night

Toronto at Night | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

What urban model is this?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:10 PM

Ironically, some land use patterns become more visible as the sun goes down.  There are some sharp borders in this image of Toronto that was taken by the Canadian astronaut, Chris Hadfield and it is a wonderful teaching image. 


Questions to ponder: Why is there such sharp divisions between the illuminated and obscure portions of the image?  What does this sharp division say about the land use patterns?  Would we see this pattern in the United States?  Why or why not?  What urban model(s) can help explain the spatial layout of Toronto? 


Tags: urban, planning, remote sensing, geospatial, Canada, models, unit 7 cities.

Demitre Athwal's curator insight, April 24, 2013 10:06 AM

The other city that never sleeps

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

This map shows each verified incident of violence in Gaza and Israel since last week's assassination of Hamas leader Ahmed al-Jabari.  Geospatial technologies combined with social media are changing how we learn about (and wage) wars. 

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

I suggest you watch to see the spatial patterns emerge!

 

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oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:24 PM

Exciting!!

Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 9:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 10:55 AM

summer work KQ2 key concepts: remote sensing, deforestation, desertification, land use, geospatial

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.

 

This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!