Edison High - AP ...
Find tag "SouthAsia"
726 views | +1 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education

Why caste still matters in India

Why caste still matters in India | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

INDIA’S general election will take place before May. The front-runner to be the next prime minister is Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party, currently chief  minister of Gujarat. A former tea-seller, he has previously attacked leaders of the ruling Congress party as elitist, corrupt and out of touch. Now he is emphasising his humble caste origins. In a speech in January he said 'high caste' Congress leaders were scared of taking on a rival from 'a backward caste'. If Mr Modi does win, he would be the first prime minister drawn from the 'other backward classes', or OBC, group. He is not the only politician to see electoral advantage in bringing up the subject: caste still matters enormously to most Indians."

Via Seth Dixon
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:00 AM

While in some ways India has been quick to adapt to the 21st century such as in the technical industry and even in the loosening of ridged marriage practices this caste system has remained. This system of societal stratification has persisted and as this article explains plays a large role in the politics of India today. The castes also play a role in employment and marriage in determining who can do what work and who it is socially acceptable to marry.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 9:18 PM

I agree that until there are more jobs created for the people of India, the slower the caste will fade out.  Over time it will fade out eventually, but the creation of jobs and more social interaction will help the process move along faster.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2:51 PM

It was interesting to read about Modi's run for prime minister- I recently read a TIME magazine article about him, his original platform, and his subsequent work in office- and to see so much of Obama's run for office in Modi's struggle. Modi's support among his own caste, traditionally one that has been discriminated against in Indian society, is not at all different from Obama's support among the African American community. It goes to show that, for all our differences, people are a lot more alike then we'd care to think. Beyond that, it was interesting to see how much power the old caste system continues to hold in Indian society, much like the issues with race that Americans continue to struggle with within our own society. Appeals to different castes have been employed successfully by politicians and other forms of media; I once read that the most popular Indian films are often love stories revolving around "forbidden love" between two members of different, opposite castes. In a society that is so rich and complex, with hundreds of different languages and beliefs, it is so easy for lines to be drawn and for differences to be focused upon in a negative light. Happily for India, it has come a long way to address these problems and to move forward. While not perfect, India's future looks bright.

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Another look at a growing megacity and its shantytowns.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education

Inside India’s pop-up city

Inside India’s pop-up city | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Every 12 years, the Kumbh Mela, a centuries-old Hindu pilgrimage, temporarily transforms an empty floodplain in India into one of the biggest cities in the world.

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:43 PM

Hindu pilgrims from all over India flock to bathe where it the Yamuna Saraswati Rivers join with the Ganges River for a religious experience.  This is a massive undertaking where the cultural practices create migratory patterns that reshape cities because of a sacred physical geography

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 12:21 AM

This article is about the sacred gathering which occurs every 12 years at the merging point of the sacred Hindu rivers. Millions of people bathe in the waters daily during the Kumbh Mela. This sacred physical geography causes a massive human migration and creates a temporary mega-city. The temporary city is an excellent way to experiment with the planning of mega cities which, as evidenced by the problematic physical and human geography of Mexico City, are often not planned so much as just they just expand to meet the needs of the time. Urban planning should be particularly interesting for the people of India as the rapid population growth will cause significant expansion in its cities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 13, 2014 1:43 PM

Every 12 years Hindus come together for a religious gathering, which results in the creation of a temporary mega city. The millions of people who attend this Hindu pilgrimage create this mega city for 55 days. It is impressive to see a temporary city supply housing, electricity, food and clean drinking water for millions of people. 

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

Via Seth Dixon
Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 4:51 PM

For those who take clean water for granted, think again. For some access to clean water is a huge obstacle to overcome and live with. Walking to the faucet in America is a gift that most citizenry don’t realize. In Bangladesh access to clean water is lessening as the country is experiencing climate changes. 20% of the 28 million in population are living in the “harsh conditions” as the article states. The climate change is greatly increasing the salinity of the coastal waters. Therefor some people have to travels miles to collect a pitcher of safe water. I cannot imagine doing that. I don’t think I would survive. Floods, storm surges, and cyclones and river bank erosion are all factors causing harm in Bangladesh, threating there drinking water. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2:39 PM

For over 20% of the population, finding safe drinking water in Bangladesh is a daily struggle that is only expected to worsen in the coming decades.These Bangladeshis live in "hard-to-reach" areas of the nation, along the swampy marshlands of the inlands and coastal outlets, where access by roads is severely restricted. This makes it difficult to transport the necessary aid to these regions, placing them disproportionately at the peril of natural disasters and other such catastrophes. The increasing salinity of the water in these areas- the result of acid rain and other man-made climate changes- has made it extremely difficult for the people of these regions to find the drinking water necessary to replenish their exploding population. With the effects of climate change only worsening, the plight of these people can be expected to get worse and worse. Millions of people face increasing health risks and even death as we move forward into the 21st century; I hope that the powers that be are able to find a solution to help these people receive the aid they so desperately need. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 6:34 AM

Water is essential to human survival. Contaminated water is a detriment to human survival. Extreme weather has caused a dwindling of the safe drinking water supply in Bangladesh. The consequences of this dwindling are catastrophic.  A lack of safe drinking water will inevitably lead to the demise of many people. Warfare is often a consequence of a lack of precious resources. No resource in the world is more precious than water. This issue was caused by extreme weather increasing the salinity of water in the costal areas. Physical geography plays a huge role in the availability of safe drinking water. Areas more prone to extreme weather are far more likely to experience these same kinds of issues. Unfortunately, Bangladesh in one of those areas that is effected by this type of scenario.  

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education

Booming Bhutan

Booming Bhutan | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Long impoverished and isolated, tiny Bhutan is finally booming. This onetime absolute monarchy has also made important democratic reforms and major improvements in quality of life.

Via Seth Dixon
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:31 PM

Bhutan has made some money selling hydropower to India and they plan to use that money to build more hydropower plants to increase their wealth. The country is also emphasizing happiness of its citizens over material wealth. All of these things will continue to provide growth and opportunity to Bhutan and its citizens.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, November 2, 2014 2:32 PM


Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 3:13 PM

Bhutan should consider themselves lucky that their country is located between China and India, two of the most powerful economic countries of the world. Without China and India, Bhutan's economy would be extremely poor because of it's size but because India agreed to assist Bhutan with grants, Bhutan has a successful economy. It's not one of the strongest but it's gratefully acceptable. Also, because manufacturing spread throughout southeast Asia, Bhutan is credited for manufacturing goods and manufacturing companies which helps build its economy.

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education

Why leave the West for India?

Why leave the West for India? | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Rising numbers of people of Indian origin born in the West are moving to the country their parents left decades ago in search of opportunity and a cultural connection, reports the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan.


Since 2005, the Indian government has been encouraging people of Indian descent and former Indian nationals to return to India.  For many Indians living in the UK, there are more and better economic opportunities for them within India.   Migrants have many reasons for moving (including cultural factors), but the primary pull factor is most certainly India's ascendant importance in the global economy and rising IT industries. 


Tags: India, South Asia, migration, immigration, Europe, colonialism, unit 2 population. 

Via Seth Dixon
Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:37 PM

As the article says, India is encouraging more people of Indian descent to return to India because of the opportunities that have become increasingly available within the country due to its  westernization . Aside from the corruption and poverty that are in India, the country has not seen any signs of these opportunities stopping.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:42 PM

With the rise in globalization and the IT industry, it is obvious that there is opportunity for success.  Many traveled to the US for economic opportunity, however many companies and IT departments are being outsourced to India, thus taking jobs away from the US.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 11, 11:16 AM

This phenomenon is a direct result of the rise of the Indian economy. Before the IT industry began to set up shop in India, returning to India was economically unfeasible. The development of the Indian economy has made India an attractive place to migrate to. If you are in the IT industry, there is more opportunity for you in India, than there is in the west. Culture is obviously another major pull for Indian immigrants. Throughout history populations have always sought to return to their native land. Especially first generation immigrants, who often never fully assimilate into the culture of their new nation.