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World's Muslim population more widespread than you might think - Pew Research Center

World's Muslim population more widespread than you might think - Pew Research Center | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
World's Muslim population more widespread than you might think
Pew Research Center
Muslims make up a majority of the population in 49 countries around the world.
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Great Visuals

 

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Gallup Reports Decline in Payroll-to-Population Employment Rate - DailyFinance

Gallup Reports Decline in Payroll-to-Population Employment Rate - DailyFinance | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Gallup Reports Decline in Payroll-to-Population Employment Rate
DailyFinance
Manufacturing In a tracking survey that estimates the percentage of the U.S.
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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

I suggest you watch to see the spatial patterns emerge!

 

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Tracy Young's curator insight, May 12, 2013 6:12 PM

Very useful visual tool for exploring patterns of change

oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:24 PM

Exciting!!

Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 9:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
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Toronto at Night

Toronto at Night | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

What urban model is this?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:10 PM

Ironically, some land use patterns become more visible as the sun goes down.  There are some sharp borders in this image of Toronto that was taken by the Canadian astronaut, Chris Hadfield and it is a wonderful teaching image. 


Questions to ponder: Why is there such sharp divisions between the illuminated and obscure portions of the image?  What does this sharp division say about the land use patterns?  Would we see this pattern in the United States?  Why or why not?  What urban model(s) can help explain the spatial layout of Toronto? 


Tags: urban, planning, remote sensing, geospatial, Canada, models, unit 7 cities.

Demitre Athwal's curator insight, April 24, 2013 10:06 AM

The other city that never sleeps

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Transportation and Population


Via Seth Dixon
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Very Interesting HUGGERS...we didn't always have highways to cruise on!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 29, 2013 3:24 PM

The highway system (and the widespread usage of air conditioning) in the later half of the 20th century dramatically changed the population settlement patterns of the United States and reshaping our cities.

 

Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, unit 7 cities.

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:
Could you live in this apartment in Hong Kong HUGGERS?
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 5:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

Via Natalie K Jensen
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Need to watch this HUGGERS!

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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Crop Diversification in Malawi

Crop Diversification in Malawi | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The tiny black-eyed pea is about to wage battle in Malawi.  The small country in southeast Africa is the site of a project to help with food security, nutrition and income.  Western University researchers are among those who will work with 30,000 farmers to help diversify crops into protein-rich legumes, such as the black-eyed pea, a popular type of cow pea in Malawi."


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Review for you!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 14, 2013 3:17 PM

Tags: food, agriculture, Africa, Malawi, unit 5 agriculture.

Seth Dixon's comment, March 15, 2013 8:44 PM
A good friend of mine is currently working for USAID in Malawi. This is what he had to say: I think crop diversification is really important here in Malawi. Most farmers have a heavy reliance on maize,which results in reduced hunger but there continues to be persistent malnutrition among children as their diets consist of mostly maize.Almost everyone here grows maize, you might be a school teacher or a health worker, but you are also most likely growing maize as well. Farmers are very risk averse here, so introducing a new crop takes time, finding the few willing to experiment and then using them to show their neighbors of the benefits. Other organizations are working on crop diversification here in Malawi, the US government, Catholic Relief Services, and other international development partners. Although not spelled out in the article, the majority of farmers are actually women, and agricultural production is typically for household subsistence with minimal cash cropping. As crop diversification increases, cash crops will provide more resources for families to pay for education and health for their families, but probably more importantly families will start diversifying their nutritional intake beyond maize. In a country where 42% of under 5 children are stunted, this will be a positive development. My wife was just out in the South of the country with CRS and was seeing some of the work that they are doing towards crop diversification as a result of USAID funding. She was really impressed to see how different vulnerable groups have been targeted by similar programs. She was able to see changes in rural villages in very insecure food zones. She saw how those lead farmers, willing to adopt new techniques or diversify crops, plant cash crops, etc, are reaping the benefits. Their neighbors are seeing it in action and are now adopting the techniques. It is not an immediate adoption, you have to give it time. These people are very risk averse, when set backs aren't just an inconvenience, but translate into starvation, it is understandable why it takes time. It also makes it more impressive when you find those willing to take the risks and try to set aside some land for a new crop. I am sure my agricultural colleagues would have more sophisticated answers but just some of my personal thoughts/observations."
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A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World

A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Want to know where the poor live? Look at where the light isn’t.

 

"Satellite photos of Earth’s artificial lights at night form a luminescent landscape. But researcher Chris Elvidge of NOAA and colleagues from the University of Colorado and the University of Denver realized that they could also illuminate something much darker: the magnitude of human poverty. By comparing the amount of light in a particular area and its known population, they realized that they could infer the percentage of people who are able to afford electricity and the level of government spending on infrastructure development. This allowed them to extrapolate levels of human development—a measure of well-being that includes such factors as income, life expectancy and literacy."


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Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Watch this HUGGERS for a great review!

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Tony Hall's curator insight, February 28, 2013 6:58 PM

This is a really cool summary look at the Human Development Index.

Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:38 PM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

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The United States of YA

The United States of YA | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A while back, I posted in the forums asking for people to help me find a YA book for every single state in the US.

Via Seth Dixon
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This is for all you avid readers out there!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 15, 2013 9:34 AM

While I can't vouch for all of these books (I read more children's literature than Young Adult), I absolutely love the idea of this project.  This is a great way to make geography a cross curricular activity, especially for an English class or just for fun.  Scroll down on the right side of this image to see all the books/states on the list.  The geographic content of some of these books are minimal, but that's not the worst thing that can happen if more students are reading.  What books are at the top of your reading list?

SchoolandUniversity's comment, February 16, 2013 2:17 AM
The United States of YA. Hey guys! This isn't an official challenge, but I really wanted to do it.
Lori Johnson's comment, February 16, 2013 9:49 AM
My favorites on the list: Under the Blood Red Sun, Deadline, The Fault in our Stars, and Dairy Queen.
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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Political Geography review

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:54 AM
I found this article really interesting for a few different reasons. As a history major, the article provided a lot of information that I thought was interesting and of which I was unaware. It’s important to understand the reasons for the breakup and/or formation of countries when studying history. Part of understanding that is recognizing and analyzing the geographic implications of these changes.
Perhaps most importantly, the disappearance of countries would certainly have severe economic repercussions. The complete absence of an economy that had been around for decades, or the emergence of several new economies all at once would have serious effects on the interaction between neighboring countries and the global economy. Cultural unity and tension also plays a large role in the disappearance of countries. Examining patterns of cultural dissimilarity and hostility explains the breakup of these countries and makes for nations that possess a great deal of cultural homogeneity and a palette of cultural diversity in a small geographic area.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

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Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Income maps of every neighborhood in the U.S. See wealth and poverty in places like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Miami, and more.

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Can you find your neighborhood HUGGERS?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 13, 2013 12:32 PM

This is the most user-friendly website I've seen to map economic census data.  This maps the average household income data on top of a Google Maps basemap that can be centered on any place in the United States.  This is a great resource to share with students of just about any age. 


Tags: statistics, census, GIS, mapping, K12.

Alejandro Restrepo's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:22 PM

Very interesting aspect of our demographics here in Central Falls. Any one with an interest in demographics and the make up our city should take a look a this and compare it to other neighborhoods in Rhode Island. Knowledge is power. Empower yourself!

Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:25 AM

Compare the neighborhoods in and around your area.  What trends do you see?  Any surprises?

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Why France is gearing up for a culture war with the United States - The Guardian

Why France is gearing up for a culture war with the United States - The Guardian | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Guardian Why France is gearing up for a culture war with the United States The Guardian The contrast sums up the opposing views: the US considers cinema and the arts as entertainment industries making profits; Europe considers culture as the...
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Mexican Company Outsourcing Jobs to the United States

Mexican Company Outsourcing Jobs to the United States | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
                                                          (ABC News) Within in the next three years, one out of three babies born in the United States will be Hispanic.
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Bimbo bread is Big here in Fresno!

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Where The World Lives, By Latitude [Infographic]

Where The World Lives, By Latitude [Infographic] | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
We live in a world divided by a coordinate grid, which means data visualizers can do cool things like plot population by distance from the equator. Below
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HUGGERS...this tells a whole lot about where people live around the world!

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Public Transit and Density

Public Transit and Density | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

What are the benefits for each?  Drawbacks? You decide!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 2013 10:25 PM

This image is an excellent visualization to use when teaching about density, public transportation and urban planning. 


Questions to Ponder: How is this a persuasive image?  Do you argee with the argument that the planning office is making? Are there something important factors that this image ignores?


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

Imran Ahmed Khan's comment, January 17, 2013 3:44 PM
Good picture! It defines the growth of the city that impact on urbanization rate, public health, socioeconomic environment. It also tell us that if we reduce vehicles on the road more space and clean environment may we get, that reduce motality and morbadity of several disease especially lung diseases.
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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Another look at a growing megacity and its shantytowns.

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Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:51 PM

See attached video clips!

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

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Is this the most polluted place on Earth? The Russian lake where an hour on the beach would kill you

Is this the most polluted place on Earth? The Russian lake where an hour on the beach would kill you | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Lake Karachay, in Russia's Chelyabinsk region, is located within the Mayak Production Association, one of the country's largest — and leakiest — nuclear facilities.

Via Natalie K Jensen
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Yikes~

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India's Slumdog census reveals poor conditions for one in six urban dwellers

India's Slumdog census reveals poor conditions for one in six urban dwellers | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Report says 64 million Indians live in degrading conditions and that a full survey would uncover even more (One in six urban Indians lives in slum housing that is "unfit for human habitation" http://t.co/BYlS2klFpP)...

Via Mr. David Burton
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

we will be talking about this next week HUGGERS.

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Ch 12 information

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 9, 2013 12:06 PM

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 7:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

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Where is an AP course being taught?

Where is an AP course being taught? | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Where are AP Human Geography courses being taught?  What other schools in nearby districts also teach a certain AP course?  This data has recently be made public (at least it's new to me) so you can find out where classes are being taught.  The actual information for particular teachers is not revealed (for some important privacy issues), but this is still a great starting pointing for local and regional collaboration for teachers.  Also additional link will show you where AP institutes and workshops are going to be held in the future.   

 

Tags: APHG, training.


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Hot Commodities

Hot Commodities | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"77 Photos of the mass production of the Earth's natural resources.  In the picture above, a Tibetan villager works in a salt field. Salt has been the most common food preservative, especially for meat, for thousands of years." 

Tags: consumption, agriculture, resources, labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Just in time for Industry!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 6:55 PM

Coal, steel, gold, iron, copper, aluminum and oil are all incredibly important commodities.  Agricultural products such as rice, cotton, corn, wheat and coffee all travel far beyond their area of origin.   Where do these resources come from?  How are they produced?  This gallery of 77 pictures is a fantastic tour of the resources that are key cogs in the global economy.  

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:52 PM

intensive or extensive agriculture? Why?

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China's demand for cotton is helping give the global market for the commodity a boost

China's demand for cotton is helping give the global market for the commodity a boost | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Higher prices HUGGERS?

 

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:45 PM

If Chinese aren't producing cotton and Chinese aren't in a need for cotton what can go wrong? Investors can have something to do with that. The investors need to bet on the highest global cotton prices in order for them to get their supply. Since cotton prices are raising through the roof, China has been producing cotton like crazy.

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Enclaves

Enclaves | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Enclaves of the world HUGGERS....review!

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Kristin Owens's comment, February 13, 2013 5:13 PM
This is amazing! It's a concept my kids seem to have difficulty grasping!
Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:18 PM
Very interesting!
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:32 AM
Mondialisation et frontières... et sur cette carte mon imminente destination de vacances: l'enclave omanaise de Musandam.