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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

An tastes so good too!

 

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:35 AM

great for unit on globalisation and fair trade

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 10:26 AM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 12:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

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Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life.There are over 7 billion people on the planet, a massive number that paints an image of human life sprawling densely over the planet...humans are unevenly distributed across the planet, leaving some areas that are densely populated and others that are largely void of life."


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Samantha Tovias's curator insight, January 12, 11:39 PM

What this article states is that in some places of the world it's crowded with a lot of people and there's not much space. People struggle to find places to live without being really close to ones neighbor. They also have to struggle over  job opportunities. Due to this they struggle with poverty and the places they are at aren't so clean. This is because people make a lot of trash and where there's many people there is a lot of trash. Therefore it's not so sanitary and they have to deal with lack of space and sanitation.

 

On the other hand, in some places of the world, there is much space to be inhabited by humans. But it's basically free land because no one lives there and there's no building occupying it. But this land could be used for many things such as building neighbor hoods, buildings, and business. Sometimes it's good to have that land free from everything because that way when there's really a reason to use it we can just go back to it with no worrys. Just as long as we don't use up too much land it should be fine. We also need to know how to control how much nature we use up. Because its also not healthy to have a lot of pollution with no trees to cleanse our oxygen. That's a hazardous precaution us humans should take.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 13, 3:30 PM

The most amazing conversation I had in Jamaica was with a musician who had traveled the world as I have. He worried about the crowding in Asia. We talked about the uneven distribution of space. I like peering down from a plane while traveling over the west ( in America) lots of white spaces on the map.

Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 4:18 PM

Well some places, such as deserts, are really hot, dry, barren and devoid of life; mostly because it's impossible to build anything on such soft ground. While places such as Texas has really dry and hard ground perfect for building foundations.  Then there's the amount of resources in that area, I.e. Water, food, tree, etc.,  and many other factors that contradict if it's inhabitable.

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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 12, 8:21 PM

This article describes how drinking water is becoming difficult to find in Bangladesh. Due to climate change, this problem will only get worse. Extreme weather such as floods and cyclones has played a large role in contaminating the drinking water. Even in Dhaka, the world's fastest growing city, the people are having trouble finding safe drinking water. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 11:20 AM

The entire country of Bangladesh is very close to sea level and floods frequently. Frequent flooding introduces salt and garbage into the water supplies and causes them to become unusable. Add to the fact that Dhaka is the fastest growing megacity and there just is not enough clean water to go around.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:25 PM

Simply put, the water in Bangladesh is unsanitary to drink. The salinity of the water is literally just unsafe to digest and something needs to be done about it. The capital is full of people that literally have no water supply and its in such high demand.

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Reducing the Vulnerability of Uzbekistan's Agriculture to Climate Change - HispanicBusiness.com

Reducing the Vulnerability of Uzbekistan's Agriculture to Climate Change HispanicBusiness.com Tashkent, Uzbekistan ( UzDaily.com ) -- Agriculture is one of the most climate-sensitive of all economic sectors, and without a clear plan for aligning...
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Rural-Urban Migration - Sinarmas World Academy International ...

Rural-Urban Migration - Sinarmas World Academy International ... | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
By 2000, there are 19 megacities and all of the cities are in developing countries except for 2, New York and Tokyo. Rural urban migration mostly take place in Less Developed Countries (LDC) like Africa, Asia and Latin ...

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Geography Poster

Geography Poster | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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These are the questions geographers ask. You should too!

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, November 9, 2013 4:17 AM

Poster sobre la enseñanza de la geografía

Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, November 10, 2013 2:14 PM

Really wished I had created this. Thanks Durman District school board and Charles E Gritzner. (Apologies is surname is incorrect - difficult to read on the poster.)

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:39 AM

can be used for the inquiry process

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Mapping 60 Years of White Flight, Brain Drain and American Migration

Mapping 60 Years of White Flight, Brain Drain and American Migration | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
An interactive picture of Americans perpetually on the move.

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For chapter 3 

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Changes in the APHG course


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HUGGERS...this will affect YOU! Take a look!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 30, 2013 10:23 AM

The APHG course outline and description was changed over the summer and the 2014 test will reflect these changes.  So what are the changes?  I've created this slideshow  to show what the changes are and add links to my site that might be thematically useful.  The hyperlinks don't work in the first 4 slides so I duplicated the unit 1 slides at the end of the document (you can download this as a PDF file or the Powerpoint file as well). 


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG.

Todd Parsons's curator insight, October 30, 2013 5:03 PM

New changes to the 2014 test!!!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2:16 PM

Take a look HUGGERS!

 

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Stop Calling Them 'Developed Countries'

Stop Calling Them 'Developed Countries' | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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A Chapter 2 video to view!

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Timothy Roth's comment, April 24, 2012 5:11 PM
love this... helps with perspective
Seth Dixon's comment, April 24, 2012 5:26 PM
Absolutely...the changes in life expectancy show that for the lower classes especially, life in a 'less' developed country today is better than life in many of the developed countries hundreds of years ago.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2013 6:14 AM

This particular graph shows Total Fertility (x axis) and Life Expectancy (y axis) which collectively can explain some of what can be called human development.  This is an interactive graphic that shows both temporal and regional patterns in changes in development.

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John Snow's cholera map of London recreated

John Snow's cholera map of London recreated | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
What would John Snow's famous cholera map look like on a modern map of London, using modern mapping tools?

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THere is a map of this in your textbook HUGGERS

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 10:01 AM

John Snow's cholera map is often noted as a prime example of using spatial thinking to solve a scientific problem.  Here are a variety of resources to explore this classic example.  Here is an article that highlights the spatial thinking that produced this map, with KML files and in Google Fusion Tables.  See also these online GIS layers of Dr. Snow's famous map. 


Tagsmedical, models, spatial, mapping.   

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The Authoritative Map


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Can we trust maps?  You decide Tigers!

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 9:26 AM

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map.

 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable? 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 27, 2013 10:04 PM

The user is putting total trust in the map to get from A to B. How can we trust the map? What are the features of good infromation? A useful discussion-starter.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:38 AM

I think this video is a perfect example of todays modern soceity. Many people in this would today are exactly like rabbit, they believe everything they see without questioning its integrity. this has cause alot of problems in todays internet fueled world with anyone being able to post whatever they want and call it fact. This is where we need more people like Pooh who question everything. Pooh sees where he wants to go with his own eyes and can tell that rabbit is leading him the wrong way. This is relateable to so much in geography but to keep it simple ill compare it to Pythagoras proclaimed the earth was spherical. He question something everyone in the world took as a fact and nobody believed him because it was already stated that the world was flat. Just like pooh questioning the "offical map"

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Agricultural Models

Agricultural Models | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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We will be studying this model in Chapter 10 HUGGERS

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:27 PM

Models in geography, even if they are at times limited in their explanatory power, are excellent pedagogical tools to promote students to think spatially. 

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Global Strategies: Video: Becoming a "Developed World"

Global Strategies: Video: Becoming a "Developed World" | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
TrackBack. TrackBack URL for this entry: http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8345175a969e2017c372aeeab970b. Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Video: Becoming a "Developed World": ...

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The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.

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Patricia Flavin's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:57 PM

loved this series - a must see and must listen.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:34 AM

Shipping containers has helped mordern globalization in many ways. The amount of trade we do with other countries allows for a cheaper process. The amount of items we can trade now because of containerization is way more than we did with trucks. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:16 PM
Containers have become such an essential part of our economy and shipping all together. SHipping in containers and on ships is not only cost effective but they can use machines to load them onto the decks of the ships. You can fit an obscene amount of product in the containers as well. The containers are also completely private you cannot see into the container so people are less likely to steal if they are unable to know what is inside.
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Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia?

Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia? | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"This map illustrates the country's deep division – and why the protests might not be what you think. Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe?"


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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:52 PM

Language and ethnicity are often tied to a political oriantation because maybe the people feel as if they can connect to someones ideas or beliefs because they are the same gender, race, or share the same cultural traditions. People like to be able to relate to others. 

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 12, 2013 11:41 AM

language and ethnicity make a big difference in a country like ukraine, ethncity usually brings along with it relgious and political ties. It would be easier for a country divided as ukraine to ramain autonomous and trade with Russia, and the EU. It would not hurt the country to stay that way.  Right now citizens are tearing down russia related statues and are politcally divided not wanting to merge with Russia with their president. it is important to choose what is most viable for their citizens and country

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 11:29 AM

There is such a solid division right through the middle of the country maybe it should split like Czechoslovakia did. The North can go with the EU and the south can go with Russia.

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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.

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CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2013 8:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 7:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 2:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

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Somaliland Guardian: Hargeisa: a city on the edge

In line with other growing third world cities, Hargeisa has a rapidly expanding population and is home to many refugees fleeing the violence in the South of Somalia, work seekers and settlers from neighbouring nations such as Ethiopia.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:22 PM

We are discussing Ethnicities and refugees... take a look for anothe example HUGGERS!

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Global Strategies: Video: Becoming a "Developed World"

Global Strategies: Video: Becoming a "Developed World" | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
TrackBack. TrackBack URL for this entry: http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8345175a969e2017c372aeeab970b. Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Video: Becoming a "Developed World": ...

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Remember we talked about megacities last week?

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:12 AM

The mega city revlution has started and accroing to stastics its only to get more popular. The creattion of these mega cities has trasformed where people want to live, while also helping to bring nations stability though creation on these mega cities. It was said that with in 30 years more than 60% of the population will live in cities. Theses megacities are desirable, they help to stablize a country and have almost doubbled in number since the 1990's. It will be intereesting to see how the effects of megacites play out on the eniorment and ecnomny in the futre though.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

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human migration

human migration | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
This collection contains a selection of content from NG Education about human migration. Use search to find more.

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We will be discussing this soon HUGGERS

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:12 AM

The mega city revlution has started and accroing to stastics its only to get more popular. The creattion of these mega cities has trasformed where people want to live, while also helping to bring nations stability though creation on these mega cities. It was said that with in 30 years more than 60% of the population will live in cities. Theses megacities are desirable, they help to stablize a country and have almost doubbled in number since the 1990's. It will be intereesting to see how the effects of megacites play out on the eniorment and ecnomny in the futre though.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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We will be learning about Malthus in Chapter 2.  Take a sneek peek!

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Jeff Cherry's curator insight, July 22, 2013 2:55 PM

Malthus is still very relevant.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 8:57 AM

The Malthusian ideas maintain that food growth is only linear, while population growth is geometric, so soon population will outgrow food production and famines will occur,

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

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This Pittsburgh restaurant only serves food from America's "enemies"

This Pittsburgh restaurant only serves food from America's "enemies" | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Conflict Kitchen is the only restaurant in the world that serves cuisine solely from countries with which the U.S. is in conflict.

Via Seth Dixon
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Any Ethnic conflicts here HUGGERS?

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Michael Plishka's curator insight, September 19, 2013 9:36 PM

Interesting Business Model

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 12:04 PM

Initially I wasn't really sure what I thought about this resturant. My initial reaction was that I hated it and thought it was a bad idea. I to seemed like we were supporting another country by serving their food. However there is a cultural experience involved when we go out to eat. Many people go out to italian resturants to get the experience of italy and etc. However after really thinking about it the US is typically in conflict with another countries government, not the people who live there. By selling the food of countries we are in conflict with almost gives us an idea about what exactly the culture is there. I think it almost educates people in such a way. I think that might be the purpose on the resturant. By eating at this resturant it opens peoples eyes to what people of that particular country are consuming on a regular day basis. That experience can be good or bad, but either way it still opens up peoples eyes to the type of world other countries are living in. I think by eating there you open yourslef up to a new cultural experience, which I belive is exactly the point that the kitchen is trying to serve. Even if it is through food. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:06 AM

Conflict Kitchen serves foods from the countries the United States is in conflict with. They might be doing this to show Americans a little bit of how their culture is b eating their foods. 

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Geography of Soccer in the US

Geography of Soccer in the US | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

" 549 players from 62 different countries play in MLS in the United States"


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Ethnicity in action HUGGERS!  

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 8:40 PM

Perfect example of cultural diffusion.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:59 AM

I am a huge soccer fan and with that i also have to say i tend to neglect the MLS due to its lack of talent. The problem in the past with the MLS was that it was too home grown and their wasnt many international players to provide a wider demographic in the leauge which also means worse players. But with the MLS signing some big names from around the world such as Henry from France Beckham from Uk and Cahill from the AU the MLS is growing in popularity around the world and is soon to be a globally viewed leauge. This is a map of where the nearly 600 MLS players come from and it goes to show the more nations you can represent the bigger crowd demographic you can draw in.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2:25 PM

There are 35 MLS players that came from Africa according to the article. In America soccer or football in Europe is not that popular it is more like our baseball or football then like the soccer over there. (That is their "past time") In America we have a large population that play sports but specifically soccer we do not have that many participants that involve themselves in this , I think part of the reason is that abroad soccer is so important to them and they try to flourish from that sport onto tournments and other MLS players go for the cup. Oppose to America and our excitment about the NFL and MBL.

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Somaliland Guardian: Hargeisa: a city on the edge

In line with other growing third world cities, Hargeisa has a rapidly expanding population and is home to many refugees fleeing the violence in the South of Somalia, work seekers and settlers from neighbouring nations such as Ethiopia.

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Lauren Jacquez's insight:

We are discussing Ethnicities and refugees... take a look for anothe example HUGGERS!

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