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Geography of Soccer in the US

Geography of Soccer in the US | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

" 549 players from 62 different countries play in MLS in the United States"


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Ethnicity in action HUGGERS!  

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:40 PM

Perfect example of cultural diffusion.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:59 AM

I am a huge soccer fan and with that i also have to say i tend to neglect the MLS due to its lack of talent. The problem in the past with the MLS was that it was too home grown and their wasnt many international players to provide a wider demographic in the leauge which also means worse players. But with the MLS signing some big names from around the world such as Henry from France Beckham from Uk and Cahill from the AU the MLS is growing in popularity around the world and is soon to be a globally viewed leauge. This is a map of where the nearly 600 MLS players come from and it goes to show the more nations you can represent the bigger crowd demographic you can draw in.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:25 PM

There are 35 MLS players that came from Africa according to the article. In America soccer or football in Europe is not that popular it is more like our baseball or football then like the soccer over there. (That is their "past time") In America we have a large population that play sports but specifically soccer we do not have that many participants that involve themselves in this , I think part of the reason is that abroad soccer is so important to them and they try to flourish from that sport onto tournments and other MLS players go for the cup. Oppose to America and our excitment about the NFL and MBL.

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Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos

Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Tourists and locals experience cities in strikingly different ways. To see just how different these two worlds are, have a look at the map of Washington D.C. above based on where people take photos. The red bits indicate photos taken by tourists, while the blue bits indicate photos taken by locals and the yellow bits might be either."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2015 11:30 AM

It amazes me how the same city can provide such diverse experiences to so many people.  Growing up in San Diego, going to the zoo was only our family's radar when company was over and they wanted to "see San Diego."  Their vision of the place, what is iconic and what is quintessentially symbolic of that place, was different from my own. 


Questions to Ponder: What are some other ways (besides local/tourist) that a place can be experienced by other groups?  How many of these 136 cities can you identify from these tourist/local patterns? 



Tagsmapping, social media, urban, placeculture, landscape, tourism

Marc Meynardi's curator insight, August 24, 2015 7:44 AM

Very interesting

 

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:32 AM

cities photos

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AP Human Geography Review Material


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This is worth your while to look at HUGGERS!

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 6, 2015 11:20 AM
its almost here! Don't' forget the list of resources on our course calendar too!
Joy Kinley's curator insight, May 7, 2015 11:34 AM

For those of you needing AP Human Geography review this is a good one.

Michael Martin's curator insight, May 9, 2015 6:36 PM

Hey students:  Check out this Prezi for REVIEW. Yay!

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Sixty Languages at Risk of Extinction in Mexico—Can They Be Kept Alive?

Sixty Languages at Risk of Extinction in Mexico—Can They Be Kept Alive? | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Sixty of Mexico's native languages are at risk of being silenced forever—but many people are working to keep them alive, experts say.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 20, 2015 10:28 PM

Monolingualism is great in the sense that it facilitates greater communication across a wider range of people, creating a sense of unity among those same people. However, lingual differences are one of the most beautiful aspects of human culture and civilization, with thousands of specific idioms and uses pertaining to each language shaping a millennium of various human experiences scattered across the globe. I often must explain to my friends that something that sounds good in one language I speak (I am moderately fluent in Portuguese) does not translate well in the other when each individual word is translated rather than the sentiment of the phrase as a whole. It is sad to think that this collection of specific nuances and experiences pertaining to a multitude of languages could be lost by the end of the century; in our desire to be closer to each other, we are losing the best of what we have to offer one another.  I hope that efforts to reverse this trend are successful. On a more light-hearted note, I did chuckle a little while reading that two of the last speakers of one of these indigenous languages in Mexico are two old men who refuse to speak to one another. They have the power to save something much larger than themselves, and yet are unable to do so because of petty, earthly rivalries. Humans are a complicated bunch.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 8:29 AM

The demise of a language is a truly tragic event. I am heartened to see that there are efforts being undertaken to preserve these historic languages. New technologies  will hopefully aid us in this effort. I imagine that the United States probably faces similar issues when it comes to language loss. We should coordinate some sort of national policy in how to deal with the issue. The current state of political affairs will probably hamper  the cause, but it is still worth a shot. I am in full support of all efforts that might preserve these classic languages.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:29 AM

This is one of the reasons that when immigrants come into this country its important they keep their native language going as well as learning to speak English. The sharing of culture, and language is indeed very important. Lots of people come to America and are told to speak English and eventually they lose their native language as well as culture. The English speaking only citizens of this country lose out on a good education about someone's native country. Its too bad. Just think music, language, food, values etc...there is a lot to learn.

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Palm Oil Plantations Are Blamed For Many Evils. But Change Is Coming

Palm Oil Plantations Are Blamed For Many Evils. But Change Is Coming | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In Indonesia, efforts are underway to grow palms in a sustainable way. But that's putting a squeeze on small farmers.

 

Palm oil is in everything, from pizza dough and chocolate to laundry detergent and lipstick. Nongovernmental organizations blame it for contributing to assorted evils, from global warming to human rights abuses. But in the past year, this complex global industry has changed, as consumers put pressure on producers to show that they're not destroying forests, killing rare animals, grabbing land or exploiting workers.

 

Tags: Indonesia, conservation, environment, consumption, SouthEastAsia, podcast.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 3, 2015 9:00 AM

Will they also stop using Glyphosate to kill the old trees in order to plant new ones? Or use Glyphosate to keep the grass from growing in their fields? Sometimes the changes are more on the marketing side, than the actual day-to-day practices.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:06 PM

Look at many household goods, and you can be sure to find palm oil in the list of its ingredients. It is one of the most commonly traded commodities in the world, but it has come under increasing scrutiny from both governmental and civilian groups concerned with the environmental and human impacts of the trade. Indonesia, one of the largest exporters of the good in the world, has made moves to make sure the continued exportation of the crop is sustainable, as they do not want to lose the revenue and job creation generated by the continued existence of the trade. Proponents of the crop argue that it takes less space to cultivate than any other competing vegetable oil, making it the easiest crop to sustain at current rates of demand. Environmentally, government and civilian groups have rallied against deforestation and have made strides to reverse the practice in regions both within Indonesia and in other areas as well.

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China (not Mexico) is the top source of new immigrants to the U.S.

China (not Mexico) is the top source of new immigrants to the U.S. | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In 2013, China replaced Mexico as the top sending country for immigrants to the United States. This followed a decade where immigration from China and India increased while immigration from Mexico decreased."


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Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:31 PM

Push and pull factors, and migration in relation to employment and quality of life-

This article explains how China in 2013 had more immigrants going to the US than Mexico. The reasons why were because of jobs and better life styles in the US.

This article represents push and pull factors, and migration in relation to employment and quality of life by showing why china had more immigrants going to the US because of job opportunities and better life styles.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 20, 2015 10:18 PM

I can already imagine the reactions I would receive from a couple of people I know if I were to post something like this on Facebook. Too often, popular opinion trumps fact, which contributes to the continued existence of stereotypes and inherently racist beliefs/institutions. I find it particularly humorous that the bulk of anti-immigration sentiment is cast at the Hispanic-American population now knowing that they do not even compromise the largest immigrant populations now entering the country! It makes it painfully obvious that this hate of Hispanic immigrants held by many Americans is less about "job security" and more about racism. I will, however, point out that the census bureau doe not account for illegal immigration to my knowledge, and I would be interested to see how this would affect the data presented in this article. 

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:57 PM

accompany "What is Normal" vidoe

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 2015 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 2015 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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Geography of Europe Games

Geography of Europe Games | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 2015 5:49 PM

An absolutely great and fun way to learn and explore different geographic locations.  Anytime learning can be made fun or turned into a game is always a win-win.  I found myself screwing around with these mini games and before I knew it, 45 minutes had passed, and I was not as good at Geography as I thought I was.  I will be back to play/learn more!

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 2015 6:59 PM

This is an interesting way to learn geography in a more interactive way. This link provides many different games that allow you to not only play a game but learn while you do it! These games can test capitals, rivers, monarchies, countries, regions, peninsulas, battles, etc. All of these relate to Europe and can provide different learning techniques for anyone who is interested in them.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:05 PM

This Toporopa is a great interaction games for people who are interested in geography. Europe has a rich history dates back to colonial times and there are many interesting facts that a lot of people does not know about it. It is fun and entertaining way to train your brain and a great review to see what you know about the world.

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Why are the MINTcountries special?

Why are the MINTcountries special? | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In 2001 the world began talking about the Bric countries - Brazil, Russia, India and China - as potential powerhouses of the world economy. The term was coined by economist Jim O'Neill, who has now identified the 'MINT' countries - Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey - as emerging economic giants. Here he explains why."

 

Tags: Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria, Turkey, economic, development.


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:45 PM

The next generation will come with more country's developments and those could be the MINT countries which are, Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey, their economy are increasing and are far more bigger than what it was in the 2003. That would be awesome to see all those countries with a developed economy. That will improve the lives of millions and specially Mexicans! Can't wait to see how it will turn out.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:05 PM

Mexico, along with the other countries in the MINT category, are developing countries that could one day become economic powerhouses.  Mexico, as noted in the article, is in a strong position to become an economic powerhouse, due to the fact that it is in between the United States and the developing countries to its south.  Mexico does face a battle however, as the country has been dominated by corruption for decades, yet the new president, who is young and energetic, is attempting to reform the system and put an end to the wide spread problem.  If Mexico can become a major economic powerhouse, it along with Canada and the United States, could from a strong North American Trio, originally envisioned when the NAFTA was signed into law, back in the 1990s. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 2015 10:00 PM

The MINT countries aren't that surprising.  After China purchased some of the US debt, it really opened my eyes to who the new powerhouse is.  Mexico could certainly be another powerful country if they could get their act together.  It will be interesting to see the shifts taking place in the next 20 years.  

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How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods)

How harsh environments make you believe in God (or gods) | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new study links climatic instability and a lack of natural resources to belief in moralizing gods in cultures around the world.

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Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:25 PM

Inspiring faith? Is God an environmental construct?

Kelli Jones's curator insight, December 2, 2014 1:06 AM

This article talks about how where we live can influence our religion. I couldn't agree more. Although I have been an active member of a church for a long time now I can't help but think that if I didn't live in the US I wouldn't be a Christian. If I were born in China for example I may not even know the name Jesus Christ. That's a scary thought. 

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 3:59 PM

This shows how different cultures have adapted to harsh environments 

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The Strategic Importance of the Caspian Sea

"Stratfor Eurasia Analyst Eugene Chausovsky examines the Caspian Sea's large energy reserves and its conflicting maritime boundaries."


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:48 PM

The Caspian Sea, an area of importance for the middle east, is divided between 5 countries. It was once divided between 2 but was divided post soviet era. The sea is a area of importance because it is a hub of transportation and economic significance for transporting goods and services. Because of the waterway in Azerbaijan they have a significant way of gaining ecnomic growth by controlling the trade in and out of the Caspian sea.  

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:09 PM

The Caspian Sea which is bordered by five countries, Russia, Turkmenistan, Iran, Kazakstan and Azerbaijan. The seas importance come from its abundance of resources. It contains large volumes of oil and gas, an estimated 48 billion barrels of oil lies within and 8.7 trillion cubic meters of gas. Much of offshore oil has not been tapped because of disputes over maritime borders. Europe is interested in energy sources as well in the southern corner as a release from Russia's grip. Both Iran and Russia seem to disagree because of the idea of a TransCaspian pipeline.    

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 12:44 PM

The Caspian Sea is an intriguing geopolitical situation. The region was once dominated by the Soviet Union but  after the collapse is shared by multiple countries. Further complicating matters is the sea is full of untapped oil deposits. Territory disputes in such a situation are almost inevitable raising tensions in the region. Azerbaijan also wants to make a deal with Turkmenistan and Europe to move gas through a pipeline to diversify their income and provide Europe and alternative to Russian fuel. Naturally the Russians with the help of Iranians are making this difficult because it would threaten their profits. It seems that  the whole area likely needs a neutral party to try and arrange fair economic usage zones in the area. The Ukrainian conflict has further exasperated this since Europe is sanctioning their key fuel provider which in turn leads to more tension over pipelines. Hopefully all the oil exploitation doesn't also lead to poor environmental consequences such as the Aral sea economic usage. It is clear that central Asia while free from communist rule is still very much tied to Russia and its past decisions.

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The price of passage

The price of passage | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Almost 35,000 people have reached the shores of Italy and Malta in 2013 and two-thirds have filed for asylum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:00 PM

This interactive map/infographic is a wealth of information about migration to Europe. 


TagsEurope, migration, economic, labor, infographic

Jennifer Lopez's curator insight, November 7, 2014 10:51 AM

This passage was about the immigration that are coming into Europe. It helped me learn how they get to there destination and the struggles they go through. This scoop also showed me thew amount of money a immigrant would have to spend in or for them to get to their destination. By it showing us statistics i can get a better understanding. Also, the statistics about the amount of immigrants that don't get to even make it to their destination and what they can and cannot bring with them.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 1:41 PM

Due to the vast distances and irregular manner of transportation to Europe, prices are very high with transport between northern Africa and southern Europe often costing more than 1000 dollars. Even traveling from Greece to Italy can cost up to 6000 dollars. Despite the high price to "guarantee access", the journey is still dangerous with 500 deaths over a two month period in 2013. This interactive shows that even though 35,000 seems like a lot of people to arrive in Europe in 2013, it is a very long, difficult, and expensive journey to get there.

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Geography Soup

"A great resource full of great links to accompany the Geography Soup channel on Vimeo."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 7:19 PM

Geography Soup is a Vimeo channel designed to include interesting videos that are laden with geographic content in them.  This powerpoint slideshow has resources designed to help you get the most flavor and substance out of these (and any other) video resources.  This is especially great for K-12 students, physical and regional geography.


Tags: K12, video.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:22 PM

Course resource

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:03 PM

Its interesting to me how the primary source of immigrants only shifts from Germany to Mexico in the 1990's, as opposed to when the country was cut in half in the fifties or during WWII. I had always thought that those events would limit German immigration more, however it appears that the primary reason for the shift is more due to the recent (relatively) drug war which erupted in Mexico.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:21 PM

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps produced by the Pew Research Center. Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the rise, but maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a flow of immigrant coming from south of the border.  The reality is that migration from Mexico to the United States has steadily dropped since 1999.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mapping, census, ethnicity.

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World's largest hotel coming to Mecca

World's largest hotel coming to Mecca | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Abraj Kudai, a complex in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, is set to become the world's largest hotel by room count when it opens in 2017.

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 22, 2015 7:37 AM

The location of the hotel makes a lot of sense. Mecca is an obvious tourist destination. Muslims from all over the world, make the sacred pilgrimage to the holy city. Those same people, are in need of accommodations once they arrive in the city. The economic potential of such a hotel is outstanding. It was also interesting to learn that Las Vegas currently has four of the five largest hotels in the world. Even with the building of this hotel, I do not see Las Vegas being displaced as the worlds premier tourist destination.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:14 PM

this is hardly surprising, with how many people go to Mecca in a year. Mecca is probably the largest single destination for religious tourism in the world, and it is the only city on earth where there are religious obligations to enter the city .

Patty B's curator insight, March 11, 12:47 PM
I found this article to be pretty eye-opening. It shows how Capitalism has spread virtually everywhere, regardless of how many people from all around the world denounce its evil way. Just as many countries in South America utilize their beautiful weather and beaches to generate revenue, Saudi Arabia is planning to utilize Islam's holiest location to do the same. Some would claim this hotel to not be in the best interest of the Muslim religion, while others can't deny that it would generate a significant amount of revenue for the surrounding area. To me, as someone raised Catholic, this seems no different than there being hotels in Rome surrounding the Vatican. I understand the financial purposes for promoting tourism in such locations, but I can also understand how some can't help but feel a sense of disrespect when such things happen. It promotes the commercialism of locations and symbols that are extremely sacred to a great number of people. But it also helps the people of Mecca and greater Saudi Arabia live more comfortable lives in some way, be it improvement to infrastructure or investing to generate long-term income. 
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London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue

London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"London completely dominates the political, cultural and economic life of the U.K. to an extent rarely seen elsewhere. That imbalance has been an issue in the run-up to Thursday's election."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2015 8:37 AM

The problems with primate cities are hardly unique to London (see here resources for teaching about primate cities using the example of Mexico City).  The lack of a balanced urban hierarchy that we would see in countries where the rank-size rule applies is a political problem as stated in this NPR podcast.  This additional BBC article bemoans Britain’s lack of a true second city, arguing that London’s shadow looms too large for sustained national development outside of the primate city. 


Tags: APHG, urbanunit 7 cities, megacities.

Blake Joseph's curator insight, May 6, 2015 6:02 PM

I remember seeing a road map of the United Kingdom once and wondering why almost every single road eventually seemed to make its way to the massive urban sprawl of London in the country's southeast. Even cities as far away as Inverness in Scotland or Belfast in Northern Ireland seemed to inevitably revolve around the massive capital. Having such a dominance on the country, I can see why other distant communities are gradually losing interest in the political and economic influences London still has on them, especially if other closer urban centers are greatly growing in population and influence. The recent election for Scotland's independence from England shows that even today many people are looking to branch out away from London's reach, and that these reasons are perhaps not totally influenced by historic tensions and rivalries between the two places. Populations centers like Birmingham and Manchester have grown immensely in the last decade, and with that has came a growing independent sense of culture and identity as well. Residents in smaller towns and villages feel that these other closer  urban areas would be a better representative of them in country-wide politics than distant London. Some of these distant communities are nearly 500 miles away from London. That is like Detroit, Michigan being politically and economically dominated by New York City. Even with London being massive in size and influential reach, I can see why far away towns in the U.K. don't always consider London too important.

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Ethiopia tests Sub-Saharan Africa's first light rail system

Ethiopia is due to launch a light rail transit system later this year, the first of its kind in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:05 PM

Finally something positive.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:59 PM

As Africa, namely Sub-Saharan Africa, lacks the technology that is required to develop and maintain this type of transportation is a great start. Time shows that if a country is given a decent amount of time to develop something good will come to it. Advances in technology today make it easier for development to happen, but once again it comes down to the ease of access to this technology in order to properly develop this and maintain it at all times.

Patty B's curator insight, February 11, 4:40 PM

The fact that Ethopia just recently opened its first railway of this nature is extremely good news for Ehtopia and the Sub-Saharan region as a whole. It marks economic and industrial progress and brings the region further into the globalized economy and society. The 20th century was one of great inequalities and vast superpowers asserting dominance and becoming extremely wealthy. I think in recent times (like the past decade or two) we have witnessed more “third-world” countries make great strides toward establishing democratic, semi-capitalistic, industrialized, modernized, and prosperous governments. But in another light, I think the news still represents, in a way, the fact that such a great gap really does exist throughout the world between the rich and the poor. This gap not only exists on an individual scale, but as this news shows, between nations as well. This great news for Ethiopia is something that happened in the U.S. a century ago. And the news is certainly good for Ethiopia and the rest of the world, and it is great news for proponents for more equal wealth distribution. But it ultimately does show that there is a long way to go until we figure out how to solve the issue of poverty across the world. 

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Mapping US History with GIS

Mapping US History with GIS | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 5:20 PM

These maps help show different patterns in the United States throughout different periods of American history such as during the Civil War, the locations of the first railroads, difference in the North and South, and also mapping the constitutional convention. it really help put it all in a geographical perspective. 

This helps create a focus on the movement of people, the "whys" of history, and the different political states and counties we have made over the years.  

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:39 PM

Use of geospatial technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), and online maps-

This article explains how GIS can be used multiple ways, whether it be in location, past, present, or predictions on the future. These GIS examples show how  the American Civil War and many other things would have been seen as.

This article demonstrates the use of geospatial technologies by showing how American history would be like if represented by GIS.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:27 PM

Get students thinking about patterns and the 'why's' of history with a focus on the geography and movement behind the historical story.  This is the link to some of the digital maps that can help you put history in it's place.  For more lesson plans, click here. 


Tags: historical, USA, mapping, spatial, GIS,  ESRI, edtech.

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Spatial Design

"How much does size really matter? Judging by this tiny home in France, not a whole lot -- as long as the space is functional.

On the seventh floor of an apartment building in Paris, there's an 86-square-foot apartment complete with a bed, kitchen, bathroom, table and chairs, closet, bathroom and storage space." --HPost


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 2014 7:26 PM

Space in a home matters, but the functionality of that space is critical.  Geography is about spatial thinking, and this video promotes a different type of spatial thinking, but one that still will help geographic thought.  As our metropolitan areas get more and more crowded, planning of this type might become increasingly common.  What advantages to you see in interior design that seek s to maximize space?  What are some drawbacks to a design such as this?


Tags: spatialdensity, urbanism, housing.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:16 PM

With an ever-growing urban population spatial design is important in maintaining functionality, efficiency and orderliness. The apartment building in Paris is especially interesting. It is practical and functions well enough to where a person can live comfortably in a markedly small but efficient space.   

Ryann Pinnegar's curator insight, July 6, 2015 3:02 AM

This tiny home is amazing! It is like the setting for a futuristic story.

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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Spatial Design

"How much does size really matter? Judging by this tiny home in France, not a whole lot -- as long as the space is functional.

On the seventh floor of an apartment building in Paris, there's an 86-square-foot apartment complete with a bed, kitchen, bathroom, table and chairs, closet, bathroom and storage space." --HPost


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 2014 7:26 PM

Space in a home matters, but the functionality of that space is critical.  Geography is about spatial thinking, and this video promotes a different type of spatial thinking, but one that still will help geographic thought.  As our metropolitan areas get more and more crowded, planning of this type might become increasingly common.  What advantages to you see in interior design that seek s to maximize space?  What are some drawbacks to a design such as this?


Tags: spatialdensity, urbanism, housing.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:16 PM

With an ever-growing urban population spatial design is important in maintaining functionality, efficiency and orderliness. The apartment building in Paris is especially interesting. It is practical and functions well enough to where a person can live comfortably in a markedly small but efficient space.   

Ryann Pinnegar's curator insight, July 6, 2015 3:02 AM

This tiny home is amazing! It is like the setting for a futuristic story.

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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Asian Border Disputes

Asian Border Disputes | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Tags: borders, political, conflict, infographic, map.


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Asie(s)'s curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:23 PM

A good overview on the matter!

Kevin Barker's curator insight, November 25, 2014 8:20 AM

A great primer for discussions over border disputes.  In this modern geopolitical climate, some of these claims can seem aggressive to say the least.  The strategies/responses can also be very interesting when military options are put aside.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:36 PM

I was looking at the disputes between the Paracel Islands, the Spratly Islands, and the Scarborough Shoal. What I notices with all oft he disputes, the land being fought over is all claimed by China but the land location itself is all closer to the country china is disputing it over. For the Paracel Islands, China and Vietnam are in dispute especially after China put 2 oil rigs by their land. The other dispute between the Spratly Islands, China and the Philippines each claim entire ownership of the lands but Malaysia, Indonesia, and Brunei all claim some part of the islands as well. For the Scarborough Shoal, it is a lot closer to the Philippines than it is to China but China claims it as their own since they discovered the land. Now china has restricted access to the island following a standoff.    

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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Visited States Map

Visited States Map | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Create a Map of all the places you've been."


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Lauren Jacquez's insight:

really cool site!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:17 PM

This is an incredibly limited mapping platform, but if all you want to do is put states of the United States into two simple categories (such as 'states I have visited' and 'states I have not visited'), then this works. 


Tags mapping, 201, edtech, cartography, mappingUSA.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:55 PM

This is a pretty cool visual representation of the different US states that you have visited.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:28 AM

I haven't been to a lot of United States. I have been to Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina & South Carolina. As we can see, I pretty much know New England pretty well. I would however, like to travel throughout the west side of the United States.

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 6, 2014 11:43 AM

50 years of communist rule still affect opportunities in Germany today, as these maps show. What they don't show is the social mirror that each provides to the other and the rich discussions about social policy that result. Reunification has been an expensive exercise for Germany, however one that it is committed to.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:20 PM

The Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, but its influence is still present in today's Germany. History plays a key role in the shaping of political boundaries and that history is clearly evident in Germany. The line where the Berlin wall once stood still divides the country economically. The western part of Germany is far more economically affluent than the east. The USSR may be gone, but its influence still remains. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:14 AM

These two maps (unemployment on the left and disposable income on the right) are but two examples in this article that highlights the lingering distinctions between the two parts of Germany that were reunited 25 years ago.  The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin  Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 


Tags: Germany, industry, labor, economic, historical, political, borders.

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 2015 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:16 PM

unit 2

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:16 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article features an interactive map that displays the numbers of IDPs (internally displaced persons) made by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. You are able to look through the years and see the varying amounts of IDPs, as well as the countries that produced the most of them and which continue to.

 

This goes along with the human geography theme of refugees and IDPs, and this is a very helpful article in providing a simple way to see an overview of where and to what extent this most occurs.