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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


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oliviersc's comment, November 13, 2012 2:50 PM
Shared in this Revue : Cheesecake et bonnets pour tenir chaud = http://blogoliviersc.org/?p=5974
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 7:53 AM

Some of the best looking images I have ever seen! The picture I found most facinating was the "Door To Hell". The Door to Hell is filled with natural gas. "In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today." The fire started in 1971 and it is still burning today!? CRAZY

 

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Central Place Theory

Central Places:Theory and Applications produced by Ken Keller (kellek@danbury.k12.ct.us) adapted from Don Ziegler.


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Good Review HUGGERS

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 11, 2013 10:03 AM

The Central Place Theory is a model that is not used much today in academic geography, but given it's explicitly spatial nature, it is used in many geography curricula (including AP Human Geography) to show systems thinking and spatial patterns.  This powerpoint goes over the main ideas of the theory developed by Walter Christaller as well as some examples.  

 

Tags: APHG, models, spatial

chris tobin's comment, March 12, 2013 3:27 PM
This is interesting. Threshold and ranges are excellent tools to market goods and services especially within the hexagon model but also with statistical informaton on socioeconomic status and dispersement within a population for marketing purposes. Thanks- great information.
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 2:15 PM

Another way to think about Central Place.

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Europe gas level high as prices rise

Europe gas level high as prices rise | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Gas and oil prices have risen amid fears the Ukraine crisis could have a damaging effect on one of Europe's main energy supply routes.  But analysts say high European gas stocks will limit the turbulence.


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Daniel Denninger's curator insight, March 4, 12:26 AM

Voila pourquoi "On" s'y intéresse autant... (à l'Ukraine !)... maintenant, vous savez !

Juan Carlos García Arpín's curator insight, March 4, 12:39 AM

El papel geoestratégico de Ucrania, la razón del conflicto, el control de materias primas fundamentales y sus rutas de distribución.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 1:24 PM

There is a distinct fact that Gas travels into the Ukraine from Russia and Belarus and leaves for Europe. Where as the gas fields are towards the east and they dont venture toward Belarus but more towards Russia and Hungry and Crimea.Gas and oil prices have risen so that it can be distrubuted and taken care of that way where as the transportation costs money. Fears about the Ukraine crisis could have a huge effect on one of Europe's main energy supply routes. But the command will even out the chaos.

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Political Advocacy for Geo-Education

Political Advocacy for Geo-Education | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Next week, a delegations from every state alliance will go to Washington D.C. to advocate for geography education and I will represent Rhode Island. On February 26th I will personally meet with Senators Whitehouse and Reed, Congressmen Cicilline and Langevin. I those meetings I will encourage them to become sponsors of the Teaching Geography is Fundamental bill. I would like to encourage you to consider voicing your support for geography education with you representatives. Did you know that Geography is the ONLY required subject that does not receive any dedicated federal funding under No Child Left Behind?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 21, 11:21 AM

If you are a member of your state geographic alliance (and if not, join!) you can help our cause immensely by letting members of Congress know that there is support for geography education and the Teaching Geography is Fundamental Act..  It helps tremendously if they already have heard from constituents about the importance of geography education BEFORE our Feb 26th meetings.   I urge you to join me in a chorus of support for action by Congress. You don’t have to go to DC to help.


You can go to SpeakUpForGeography.org and send pre-written letters directly to your Senators and Representative...please join me in this effort to strengthen geography education in the United States. 

Denise McKinney Ethun's curator insight, February 22, 1:12 PM

As a Social Science teacher and Librarian I urge you to support Geography in our school curriculum.

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Heart-shaped landscapes

Heart-shaped landscapes | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

The top image is of a mangrove stand in New Caledonia, Glaslyn (Blue lake) is in Northern Wales and this cave is in the 4 corners region of the United States. 


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How sweet it is!

Happy Valentines Day

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Estelblau's comment, February 14, 1:03 PM
Really great ;)!
Estelblau's comment, February 14, 1:03 PM
Really great ;)!
Pasquale Abiuso's curator insight, February 17, 2:23 AM

Storie di natura.

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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 


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New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 5:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 20, 2013 10:30 PM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
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A short, recent history of Congo

Mapping the war in Congo: mineral wealth, militias and an epic march

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, January 31, 9:04 AM

The conflict in the DROC is extremely complex, inter-cultural war that has been continued since the Belgians left in 1960. The rushed and violent rule imposed by the Belgian's King Leopold II caused problems from the start, and it didn't help when they left the burden of government to the unorganized people of the region. Millions of people have been killed throughout the conflict, many of whom were children. This video is very educational about the conflict and its causes over the years.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 7:16 AM

The problems of Congo are exacerbated by the mischief of Rwanda.  When you think about a country that is blessed with such abundant natural resource you would think that economically they would be doing well.  However, the turbulence of politics in this region has caused the opposite to occur.  The country is constantly destabilized by the conflicts in its neighboring counties and constant rebellions and conflict have wreaked and destabilized this country.  The blessings of abundant natural resources has, instead become a curse.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 7:10 PM

 This video tells me that having an abundance of natural and mineral resources may not always lead to a country that is successful and rich. If the country is politically or economically unstable it could lead to violence within the area over the valuable goods. Also, the wealth generated from these goods could potentially make only a few people very rich and many other workers who collect these resources poor from low wages. 

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Exploring Mexico through Dynamic Web Maps

Exploring Mexico through Dynamic Web Maps | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"One of the people I regard most highly here at Esri has created an online atlas of Mexico.  The maps can be accessed in many different ways, such as an ArcGIS Online presentation with a description here, as an iPad iBook, but I think most importantly, as a series of story maps.  Each of these separate story maps contains 1 to 6 thematically related maps on the following topics:

Explore Mexico (Crime vs. Tourism)Mexico’s Natural WondersMexico’s Historical MonumentsGeography of Mexico – Did You Know?Indigenous People of MexicoCartograms of Mexico

 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 8:00 AM

I had no idea Honduras was the country with the highest murder rate in the entire world! These map are extremely interesting, as we see the obvious tourist destinations are everywhere on the coasts as opposed to the interior of the country of Mexico, yet the majority of the historical structures are in the interior centered around Mexico City.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 13, 12:14 PM

This site is neat.  The ability to use interactive maps to explore this country is very informative.  I recommend this site to anyone interesting in learning more about Mexico!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 7:17 AM

These maps all come together in a somewhat story-like sense. They are thematically related and can be separated to be able to look at each map individually. I like how there are multiple ways to access the maps.

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Developing Countries and Global Trade - Asia Sentinel (blog)

Developing Countries and Global Trade - Asia Sentinel (blog) | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Developing Countries and Global Trade Asia Sentinel (blog) The majority of developing countries, including even the poorest, are increasingly participating in these global value chains, with the developing-country share of value-added trade...

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The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.

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Patricia Flavin's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:57 PM

loved this series - a must see and must listen.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:34 AM

Shipping containers has helped mordern globalization in many ways. The amount of trade we do with other countries allows for a cheaper process. The amount of items we can trade now because of containerization is way more than we did with trucks. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:16 PM
Containers have become such an essential part of our economy and shipping all together. SHipping in containers and on ships is not only cost effective but they can use machines to load them onto the decks of the ships. You can fit an obscene amount of product in the containers as well. The containers are also completely private you cannot see into the container so people are less likely to steal if they are unable to know what is inside.
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Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia?

Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia? | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"This map illustrates the country's deep division – and why the protests might not be what you think. Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 11, 2013 6:30 PM

The country of Ukraine is both ethnically and linguistically divided and since the fall of the Soviet Union, the partisan politics have mirrored these divisions.  The northwestern portion of the country is primarily ethnic Ukrainian and with the majority speaking Ukrainian.  This section of the country that is hoping to strengthen economic and political ties with the EU and face Europe; those that aren't as bullish on the EU here at least want to explore other options so they aren't overpowered by Moscow's shadow.  The southeastern portion of Ukraine primarily speaks Russian with sizeable ethnic Russian populations (although many ethnic Ukrainians speak Russian here); not surprisingly, this is the part of the country that would rather join in an economic union with Russia and other former Soviet Republics, or at least not turn their backs on Moscow. 


Questions to Ponder: Why are language and ethnicity often tied to political orientation?  Why might trading with all economic partners not be as viable an option?

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:52 PM

Language and ethnicity are often tied to a political oriantation because maybe the people feel as if they can connect to someones ideas or beliefs because they are the same gender, race, or share the same cultural traditions. People like to be able to relate to others. 

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 12, 2013 11:41 AM

language and ethnicity make a big difference in a country like ukraine, ethncity usually brings along with it relgious and political ties. It would be easier for a country divided as ukraine to ramain autonomous and trade with Russia, and the EU. It would not hurt the country to stay that way.  Right now citizens are tearing down russia related statues and are politcally divided not wanting to merge with Russia with their president. it is important to choose what is most viable for their citizens and country

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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.

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CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2013 8:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 7:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 2:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

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Somaliland Guardian: Hargeisa: a city on the edge

In line with other growing third world cities, Hargeisa has a rapidly expanding population and is home to many refugees fleeing the violence in the South of Somalia, work seekers and settlers from neighbouring nations such as Ethiopia.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:22 PM

We are discussing Ethnicities and refugees... take a look for anothe example HUGGERS!

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Global Strategies: Video: Becoming a "Developed World"

Global Strategies: Video: Becoming a "Developed World" | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
TrackBack. TrackBack URL for this entry: http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8345175a969e2017c372aeeab970b. Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Video: Becoming a "Developed World": ...

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 5, 6:39 AM

In the Atlantic, there was an article that highlighted some incredible comparisons of Shanghai’s Pudong district that shows the impact of globalization.  This image is my rendering of the two images as a composite image.  Globalization has hit…hard and fast.  Today, we shouldn't think of Shanghai as a major city in China, but as as one of the major cities in the world.

Tony Hall's curator insight, March 6, 3:38 AM

Wow. This is amazing. The cynical side of me wonders what the costs have been for the people of the area. Not to mention the environmental costs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 9:38 AM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

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Walmart Slumber Party

Walmart Slumber Party | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Who wants to spend the night in a Walmart parking lot?

 

There are a few generally accepted principles when it comes to the etiquette of spending the night in a vehicle in a Walmart parking lot. One night only. No chairs or barbecue grills outside an R.V. Shop at the store for gas, food or supplies, if you can, as a way of saying thanks. Walmart, the country’s largest discount retailer, says you’re welcome: its Web site says that R.V. travelers are “among our best customers.” The photographer Nolan Conway has been taking pictures of Walmart’s resident guests at several stores in central Arizona. Sophia Stauffer, a 20-year-old who travels the country in a van with her boyfriend and their dog, describes their lots, which usually feel quiet and safe, as their best option for most nights. “We really don’t want to work or live in a house,” she says.


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Lauren Jacquez's insight:

We see this all the time at our Walmarts in Fresno!

 

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Jeremy Weaver's comment, March 2, 8:46 PM
Staying in a Walmart parking lot in a car or RV would be fun for a while but I could never do it for more than a week at a time. It's crazy to think that the one guy had been living out of his car for seven years.
Darien Southall's comment, March 2, 10:23 PM
When I was younger my family went on a road trip before heading to a family reunion. The half a week we were on the road we stopped in Walmart parking lots during the nights. Honestly, I think that staying in a Walmart parking lot is something everyone should experience while on the road (whether it be good or bad).
Willow Weir's comment, March 10, 9:07 AM
I can see the appeal of safety and the inexpensive nature compared to a camp. I don't think the ability to camp in their parking lots makes up for walmarts many ills considering how many families they keep in poverty
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Global Perceptions of the United States

Global Perceptions of the United States | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Placeholder for the Pew Global Indicators Database

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 10:22 AM

In this I saw that when choosing Russia to look at in relation to its relationship with the United States throughtout the years it has both increased and decreased. For example, In 2008 the percentage of relationship with the US and Russia was at 29% then in  2009 it decreased to 27% and then fianlly increasing in 2013 to 31%. As you can see the US and Russia are partners in life today to some extend and have evolved from time to time( past to present).

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 21, 9:18 PM

Images...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 1:25 PM

Kenya is measure as a parter and alliance with the United States for instance, in the Fall of 2009 a report came out and it proved taht 89% thought of Kenya as an alliance. Shockingly enough in 2013 the alliance with Africa drew at a small decrease of 79%.

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Shifting post-colonial economic geographies

Shifting post-colonial economic geographies | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Changes in relationships can be hard to take. The economic bond between Latin America and Spain, its biggest former colonial power, is shifting as the region’s economies mature. Despite some ruffled feathers, the evolution is positive.  After two decades in which Spain amassed assets worth €145 billion ($200 billion) in Latin America, last year was the first in which Latin American companies spent more on acquiring their Spanish counterparts than the other way around."


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 10:37 AM

Post- Coloonial Economical Gographies- It is important to remember that in the past Latin American companies spent less on acquiring the Spanish counterparts and last year for the first time they have shifted in which Latin America spent more acquriring their Spanish counterparts. After teo decades Spain's worth would be close to $200 billion in Latin America. Latin America in relation to Spain is very different because gears have shifted in order fot the net worth to compile to where it is today. The same goes for Spain in relation to Latin America.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 4:43 PM

This article describes the changing relationship between Latin America and its former colonial power, Spain. Latin America shares a cultural bond with Spain which is influencing how the Latin American economies develop. This cultural bond, along with the economies, are having an effect on migration.

As Latin American countries are becoming increasingly industrialized their economies have grown and Latin America is frequently looking at Spain for a place to invest due to their cultural similarities, like language. Latin America is investing in Spanish business while Spain, in an economic slump at home, is benefiting from Latin American markets and investments. Unsurprisingly, over the past several years trade between the Spain and Latin America has become more and more profitable for Latin America as their increasing industrial power can send manufactured products to a more deindustrialized Spain.

The economic slump in Spain is seeing Spaniards migrate away from their home country. Latin America, with its cultural similarity, is increasingly becoming a destination for these Spaniards in need of work due to the growing economies of Latin American countries. Some migrations may even be the result of Latin American investors owning a large portion of a Spanish worker's company in the first place.

This flip in economic power is unsurprisingly since it would be impossible for Spain to keep pace with its former colonies collectively. Though depleted by colonization, there are still significant resources available to Latin America, chief among them cheap agricultural labor and massive amounts of fertile land. Even with friction over their colonial past with Spain, Latin America is still investing in Spain and Spaniards still look to Latin America for work and investment opportunities.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 7:35 PM

Unit IV

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Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia

Improving Mortality Rates In Ethiopia | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times more likely to survive to age 5 than one born in 1990.  This progress isn't a result of expensive international aid or the recruitment of foreign doctors into Ethiopia. Instead, the country has invested in simple, bare-bone clinics scattered around the country, which are run by minimally-educated community health workers."


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This topic goes with our study of HDI HUGGERS

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 2, 5:53 AM

This NPR podcast shows how local programs that target rural health can have a massive impact on key demographic and development statistics.  This is great news-- infant mortality rates around the world have dropped from 46 deaths/1000 to 35 deaths/1000 in the last 8 years and local programs such as this one have been a major reason why.   


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, medical, development.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 6:25 PM

It is good to see Ethiopians are taking small steps to becoming a better and healthier country, such as opening simple clinics in more areas. When a child has a greater chance to survive it can only put a smile on your face. More countries in Africa should follow this simple step in order to have a healthier population. 

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Changes in the APHG course


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Take a look HUGGERS!

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 30, 2013 10:23 AM

The APHG course outline and description was changed over the summer and the 2014 test will reflect these changes.  So what are the changes?  I've created this slideshow  to show what the changes are and add links to my site that might be thematically useful.  The hyperlinks don't work in the first 4 slides so I duplicated the unit 1 slides at the end of the document (you can download this as a PDF file or the Powerpoint file as well). 


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG.

Todd Parsons's curator insight, October 30, 2013 5:03 PM

New changes to the 2014 test!!!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 31, 2013 7:31 AM

HUGGERS...this will affect YOU! Take a look!

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HDI Map

HDI Map | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Our mission is to provide easy-to-use, yet methodologically sound tools for understanding well being and opportunity in America and to simulate fact-based dialogue about issues we all care about: health, education and income. "


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HDI...Chapter 9 material HUGGERS!

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 3:31 AM

This article allows us to see development in our country. There is abviously less very developed areas and more lower develops on a macro level in this country. This map provides a better understanding for what the looks like in areas of the US we are familiar with. It also helps us to glean strategies of how to spatially implement the development of more lands. This focuses on how evenly spread healthm education, and income is throughout the country. The oeverall question is how do we improve development as a whole throughout the whole country.

Mrs. B's curator insight, November 18, 2013 6:08 AM

Love how this dissaggregates the data to individual states. What are the states with the highest HDI and why?

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, November 23, 2013 2:00 PM

A wonderful tool to explore and play around with demography, income, etc. across the U.S.  It would be great if you could dial in on only coastal counties to compare coastal vs. inland regions of the U.S.

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


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An tastes so good too!

 

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:35 AM

great for unit on globalisation and fair trade

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 10:26 AM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 12:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

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Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life.There are over 7 billion people on the planet, a massive number that paints an image of human life sprawling densely over the planet...humans are unevenly distributed across the planet, leaving some areas that are densely populated and others that are largely void of life."


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Samantha Tovias's curator insight, January 12, 11:39 PM

What this article states is that in some places of the world it's crowded with a lot of people and there's not much space. People struggle to find places to live without being really close to ones neighbor. They also have to struggle over  job opportunities. Due to this they struggle with poverty and the places they are at aren't so clean. This is because people make a lot of trash and where there's many people there is a lot of trash. Therefore it's not so sanitary and they have to deal with lack of space and sanitation.

 

On the other hand, in some places of the world, there is much space to be inhabited by humans. But it's basically free land because no one lives there and there's no building occupying it. But this land could be used for many things such as building neighbor hoods, buildings, and business. Sometimes it's good to have that land free from everything because that way when there's really a reason to use it we can just go back to it with no worrys. Just as long as we don't use up too much land it should be fine. We also need to know how to control how much nature we use up. Because its also not healthy to have a lot of pollution with no trees to cleanse our oxygen. That's a hazardous precaution us humans should take.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 13, 3:30 PM

The most amazing conversation I had in Jamaica was with a musician who had traveled the world as I have. He worried about the crowding in Asia. We talked about the uneven distribution of space. I like peering down from a plane while traveling over the west ( in America) lots of white spaces on the map.

Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 4:18 PM

Well some places, such as deserts, are really hot, dry, barren and devoid of life; mostly because it's impossible to build anything on such soft ground. While places such as Texas has really dry and hard ground perfect for building foundations.  Then there's the amount of resources in that area, I.e. Water, food, tree, etc.,  and many other factors that contradict if it's inhabitable.

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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

Via Seth Dixon
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Tracy Klug's curator insight, December 16, 2013 5:47 AM

How can the globe evenly distribute surplus goods?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 7:38 PM

The article describes the difficulties in obtaining safe drinking water in Bangladesh. As a result of climate change, rainfall has become sporadic and irregular resulting in sea water entering the underground aquifers which are depleted due to the immense population of the country. Similarly, the natural geography of the inland areas is contaminating the water with silt due to flooding and erosion.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 12, 8:21 PM

This article describes how drinking water is becoming difficult to find in Bangladesh. Due to climate change, this problem will only get worse. Extreme weather such as floods and cyclones has played a large role in contaminating the drinking water. Even in Dhaka, the world's fastest growing city, the people are having trouble finding safe drinking water. 

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Reducing the Vulnerability of Uzbekistan's Agriculture to Climate Change - HispanicBusiness.com

Reducing the Vulnerability of Uzbekistan's Agriculture to Climate Change HispanicBusiness.com Tashkent, Uzbekistan ( UzDaily.com ) -- Agriculture is one of the most climate-sensitive of all economic sectors, and without a clear plan for aligning...
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Rural-Urban Migration - Sinarmas World Academy International ...

Rural-Urban Migration - Sinarmas World Academy International ... | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
By 2000, there are 19 megacities and all of the cities are in developing countries except for 2, New York and Tokyo. Rural urban migration mostly take place in Less Developed Countries (LDC) like Africa, Asia and Latin ...

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