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Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos

Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Tourists and locals experience cities in strikingly different ways. To see just how different these two worlds are, have a look at the map of Washington D.C. above based on where people take photos. The red bits indicate photos taken by tourists, while the blue bits indicate photos taken by locals and the yellow bits might be either."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 11:30 AM

It amazes me how the same city can provide such diverse experiences to so many people.  Growing up in San Diego, going to the zoo was only our family's radar when company was over and they wanted to "see San Diego."  Their vision of the place, what is iconic and what is quintessentially symbolic of that place, was different from my own. 


Questions to Ponder: What are some other ways (besides local/tourist) that a place can be experienced by other groups?  How many of these 136 cities can you identify from these tourist/local patterns? 



Tagsmapping, social media, urban, placeculture, landscape, tourism

Marc Meynardi's curator insight, August 24, 7:44 AM

Very interesting

 

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Visited States Map

Visited States Map | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Create a Map of all the places you've been."


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Lauren Jacquez's insight:

really cool site!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:17 PM

This is an incredibly limited mapping platform, but if all you want to do is put states of the United States into two simple categories (such as 'states I have visited' and 'states I have not visited'), then this works. 


Tags mapping, 201, edtech, cartography, mappingUSA.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:55 PM

This is a pretty cool visual representation of the different US states that you have visited.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 12:28 AM

I haven't been to a lot of United States. I have been to Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina & South Carolina. As we can see, I pretty much know New England pretty well. I would however, like to travel throughout the west side of the United States.

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:24 PM

The reason this article and maps are so important is because it shows that immigration isn't a new aspect of the American way of life. Historically people from across the globe flocked to America from Europe and Asia and today we're seeing increasing immigration from Central and South Americans as well as those fleeing unstable areas in the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 6:56 PM

This article was very interesting to look at. I had knowledge that the majority of the immigrant population came from Mexico but it gave a different perspective to see it on a map. The one aspect that caught my attention was how the map of the United States looked like in 1910. The majority of the immigrants back then came from Europe, mainly Germany. Germany was the top country birth among U.S. immigrants because it was very dominating. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

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Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Slums also known as favelas, squatter settlements

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:11 PM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Income maps of every neighborhood in the U.S. See wealth and poverty in places like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Miami, and more.

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Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Can you find your neighborhood HUGGERS?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 13, 2013 12:32 PM

This is the most user-friendly website I've seen to map economic census data.  This maps the average household income data on top of a Google Maps basemap that can be centered on any place in the United States.  This is a great resource to share with students of just about any age. 


Tags: statistics, census, GIS, mapping, K12.

Alejandro Restrepo's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:22 PM

Very interesting aspect of our demographics here in Central Falls. Any one with an interest in demographics and the make up our city should take a look a this and compare it to other neighborhoods in Rhode Island. Knowledge is power. Empower yourself!

Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:25 AM

Compare the neighborhoods in and around your area.  What trends do you see?  Any surprises?

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Cancer's Global Footprint

Cancer's Global Footprint | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Cancer is often considered a disease of affluence, but about 70% of cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
Explore this interactive map to learn about some cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.

 

With this interactive map, users can explore cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.  How do these spatial distributions correlate with other developmental, consumption or economic patterns?  What surpises you about this data?   

 

Tags: medical, mapping, spatial.  


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:04 PM

The high rates of cancer in the United States and other wealthy countries was not surprising, the high rates of liver cancer in West Africa was. Similarly, the very high rates of liver and stomach cancer in China and Mongolia was shocking since the apparent cause is salty, pickled foods.

 

I imagine 30 years from now the rates of lung cancer will drop off a cliff for the United States, but I wonder if the same would be true for Poland which also has a very high rate of lung cancer.

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The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Not every state is equally impacted by migration, and the demographic profile of migrants is different for every state. This is an online mapping tool to search a large database that can give the user state specific information about the impact of economics and politics based on migration from Latin America and Asia on any given state.

 

Tags: Immigration, unit 2 population, migration, economic, statistics, mapping, political.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 26, 2014 12:43 PM

Unit 2 population and migration 

This map shows the population of migrants in certain states and compares them to other states. This demographic specifically highlights Texas and shows its migrant information. Texas has the highest immigrant income out of all of the states. Also Texas has very few naturalized citizens who used to be an immigrant.

This map relates to unit 2 because it shows the illegal immigration. And immigration theories. This proves ravensteins laws correct because it shows how people move a short distance to migrate, knowing that most migrants to America come from Latin America. This map is a great example of ravensteins theories and unit 2

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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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Mapping US History with GIS

Mapping US History with GIS | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Yunus Khan's comment, May 7, 2:09 AM
Is this new technology
Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 5:20 PM

These maps help show different patterns in the United States throughout different periods of American history such as during the Civil War, the locations of the first railroads, difference in the North and South, and also mapping the constitutional convention. it really help put it all in a geographical perspective. 

This helps create a focus on the movement of people, the "whys" of history, and the different political states and counties we have made over the years.  

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 12:39 PM

Use of geospatial technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), and online maps-

This article explains how GIS can be used multiple ways, whether it be in location, past, present, or predictions on the future. These GIS examples show how  the American Civil War and many other things would have been seen as.

This article demonstrates the use of geospatial technologies by showing how American history would be like if represented by GIS.

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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Look at Fresno HUGGERS!

 

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Mrs. Karnowski-Simul's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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The Authoritative Map


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Can we trust maps?  You decide Tigers!

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:26 PM

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map.

 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable? 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:04 AM

The user is putting total trust in the map to get from A to B. How can we trust the map? What are the features of good infromation? A useful discussion-starter.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:38 AM

I think this video is a perfect example of todays modern soceity. Many people in this would today are exactly like rabbit, they believe everything they see without questioning its integrity. this has cause alot of problems in todays internet fueled world with anyone being able to post whatever they want and call it fact. This is where we need more people like Pooh who question everything. Pooh sees where he wants to go with his own eyes and can tell that rabbit is leading him the wrong way. This is relateable to so much in geography but to keep it simple ill compare it to Pythagoras proclaimed the earth was spherical. He question something everyone in the world took as a fact and nobody believed him because it was already stated that the world was flat. Just like pooh questioning the "offical map"

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Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."


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Common core ideas

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2013 12:05 PM

The recently revised Geography for Life standards have been aligned to show how geographic skills can be taught within the Common Core framework.  The National Geographic Society, in cooperation with the National Council for Geographic Education and the Network of Alliances for Geographic Education created Connections to be that link (for grade specific Common Core/Geography resources click here). 


So how is this to be done? This storymap shows ten great examples of maps that can be used as reading documents, one for each of the 10 ELA Reading Standards. 


TagsmappingEnglish, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Duke No Limit's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:53 PM

wow very interesting

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

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John Snow's cholera map of London recreated

John Snow's cholera map of London recreated | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
What would John Snow's famous cholera map look like on a modern map of London, using modern mapping tools?

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

THere is a map of this in your textbook HUGGERS

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:01 PM

John Snow's cholera map is often noted as a prime example of using spatial thinking to solve a scientific problem.  Here are a variety of resources to explore this classic example.  Here is an article that highlights the spatial thinking that produced this map, with KML files and in Google Fusion Tables.  See also these online GIS layers of Dr. Snow's famous map. 


Tagsmedical, models, spatial, mapping.   

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Tweetping

Tweetping | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Check out the twitter activity in realtime

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, February 5, 2013 11:41 AM

This links to a page where tweets on Twitter are tracked in real time and displayed on a dot map.

 

Questions: What regions have the most tweets? Do you think there are differences between what people tweet about in one part of the world versus another? What can you infer about the areas where there are no tweets reported?

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 6, 2013 12:59 PM

Globalisation and the Internet; The US superpower and its softpower

nzgeogeek's curator insight, February 24, 2013 6:50 AM

You need to open this page in Google Chrome. It will not work using Internet Explorer.

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Generate Simple World Maps

Generate Simple World Maps | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Free travel tip and photos from all over the world...

 

This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website. Virtually anyone can make a 1-feature world map by simply clicking on a checklist all of the countries you want highlighted on your map. Second, open the file and add some text and a few lines to label it. This took less than 20 minutes to make with no need for any cartographic or GIS experience (this PNG didn't compress well, the full image of this map can be seen here).


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 30, 2012 10:04 PM

This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website.  Virtually anyone can make a 1-feature world map by simply clicking on a checklist all the countries you want highlighted on your map.  Second, opened the file and added some text and a few lines to label it.  This took 20 minutes to make with no need for any cartographic or GIS experience  (this PNG didn't compress well, the full image of this map can be seen here).

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.

 

This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!
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Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

This map shows each verified incident of violence in Gaza and Israel since last week's assassination of Hamas leader Ahmed al-Jabari.  Geospatial technologies combined with social media are changing how we learn about (and wage) wars. 

 


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