Edison High - AP Human Geography
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Where We Came From, State by State

Where We Came From, State by State | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 14, 2014 1:20 PM

This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  This graph of Florida shows that around 1900, most people living in Florida were from the South.  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving in.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:42 PM

APHG-U2

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:51 PM

Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years. helps show the nature of change around the United States and its impact in the enviorment.

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

Via Seth Dixon
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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:03 PM

Its interesting to me how the primary source of immigrants only shifts from Germany to Mexico in the 1990's, as opposed to when the country was cut in half in the fifties or during WWII. I had always thought that those events would limit German immigration more, however it appears that the primary reason for the shift is more due to the recent (relatively) drug war which erupted in Mexico.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:21 PM

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps produced by the Pew Research Center. Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the rise, but maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a flow of immigrant coming from south of the border.  The reality is that migration from Mexico to the United States has steadily dropped since 1999.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mapping, census, ethnicity.

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Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Income maps of every neighborhood in the U.S. See wealth and poverty in places like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Miami, and more.

Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Can you find your neighborhood HUGGERS?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 13, 2013 12:32 PM

This is the most user-friendly website I've seen to map economic census data.  This maps the average household income data on top of a Google Maps basemap that can be centered on any place in the United States.  This is a great resource to share with students of just about any age. 


Tags: statistics, census, GIS, mapping, K12.

Alejandro Restrepo's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:22 PM

Very interesting aspect of our demographics here in Central Falls. Any one with an interest in demographics and the make up our city should take a look a this and compare it to other neighborhoods in Rhode Island. Knowledge is power. Empower yourself!

Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:25 AM

Compare the neighborhoods in and around your area.  What trends do you see?  Any surprises?

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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Look at Fresno HUGGERS!

 

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Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.