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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

Via Seth Dixon
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 6:58 PM

This article shows the shift of immigration over the past 100 years. From the predominantly European wave in 1910 to the more diverse wave in 2010 that consists of Mexican, Canada, India and many other countries.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 28, 12:10 AM

It's pretty clear that immigration has changed a lot in the US in the last 100 years. It was first full of Europeans, with a majority of Germans and now is almost full of Mexican, the largest wave of immigration in history from a single country to the United States. An interesting fact to know. We might think that Mexico was always the largest immigrants and is wasn't always like that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 6:24 PM

The reason this article and maps are so important is because it shows that immigration isn't a new aspect of the American way of life. Historically people from across the globe flocked to America from Europe and Asia and today we're seeing increasing immigration from Central and South Americans as well as those fleeing unstable areas in the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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Why Canada needs a flood of immigrants

Why Canada needs a flood of immigrants | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Between now and 2021, a million jobs are expected to go unfilled across Canada. Ottawa is making reforms to the immigration system but isn't going far enough. We need to radically boost immigration numbers. With the right people, Canada can be an innovative world power. Without them, we'll drain away our potential."  This article clearly articulates some of the economic ramifications of the later stages of the demographic transition and some of the difficulties that are associated with a declining internal population. 


Via Seth Dixon
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