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Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Mrs. Watson's Class
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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Remember we talked about megacities last week?

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:07 PM

As Bangkok, Thailand is slotted to be one of the up an coming biggest cities in the world it puts Thailand on the map.  People see that the clothes they wear were made in Thailand and we think of a sweatshop in a far east country where children are laboring away for long hours making little money.  Although this was true in the past, we see now that it isn't like that.   These cities are where a lot of people are crammed together and live, yes, but also full of people who are looking forward to a better life.  These people have hope in the future of the city that they live in and are ready to invest in the future.  When comes the time that a majority of people will live in cities these cities such as Bangkok will already be developed and thriving, a major plus for the people already living and working here. 

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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Hijab: Veiled in Controversy

Hijab: Veiled in Controversy | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Hijab is an Islamic concept of modesty and privacy, most notably expressed in women’s clothing that covers most of the body.

Via Seth Dixon
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Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:27 AM

 understanding difference

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 2:39 PM
The hijab has become a very controversial issue on the global scale. For example, Saudi Arabian and Iran women are required to wear it where as other countries (most recently France) have banned the wearing of such religious garments. Under the U.S. constitutions first amendment of freedom of speech and freedom of religion allows the women to wear them. For many women it is a choice of modesty or a way to show her devotion to her religion. Many people today still are uneducated about the topic and see it as a way these women are being oppressed. Ultimately it is that woman's choice, but it is a shame that in some places it may come with a price.
Mary Rack's comment, September 19, 2013 3:20 PM
Thank you, Shelby!!
Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Geography Education
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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:07 PM

As Bangkok, Thailand is slotted to be one of the up an coming biggest cities in the world it puts Thailand on the map.  People see that the clothes they wear were made in Thailand and we think of a sweatshop in a far east country where children are laboring away for long hours making little money.  Although this was true in the past, we see now that it isn't like that.   These cities are where a lot of people are crammed together and live, yes, but also full of people who are looking forward to a better life.  These people have hope in the future of the city that they live in and are ready to invest in the future.  When comes the time that a majority of people will live in cities these cities such as Bangkok will already be developed and thriving, a major plus for the people already living and working here. 

Rescooped by Lauren Jacquez from Mrs. Watson's Class
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Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
Lauren Jacquez's insight:

Common core ideas

 

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

John Slifko's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:23 PM

Increasinglly the historiography of Freemasonry will be mpaced by he discipiine of historical geogrphy combining empirical data, place and narrative drama and code. 


Kendra King's curator insight, January 22, 7:03 PM

Good old Common Core.