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Geography of Europe Games

Geography of Europe Games | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:59 AM

I thought that this game was really useful for getting to know all different aspects of Europe. I really like how it was separated into a variety of different categories that focused on different things in Europe. Of course I was familiar with the countries category. Some things that I was not familiar with before finding this game was all the bodies of water in Europe. I am now aware of the different lakes, seas, and rivers in Europe. I thought it was really cool how it went into some real detail and included aspects like the ports, volcanoes, monarchies, and the battles. I definitely was not aware with any of these before seeing this game. I think this is a very useful game if you wish to know more about Europe or maybe even if you're traveling there and want to get some background knowledge.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 5:49 PM

An absolutely great and fun way to learn and explore different geographic locations.  Anytime learning can be made fun or turned into a game is always a win-win.  I found myself screwing around with these mini games and before I knew it, 45 minutes had passed, and I was not as good at Geography as I thought I was.  I will be back to play/learn more!

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 6:59 PM

This is an interesting way to learn geography in a more interactive way. This link provides many different games that allow you to not only play a game but learn while you do it! These games can test capitals, rivers, monarchies, countries, regions, peninsulas, battles, etc. All of these relate to Europe and can provide different learning techniques for anyone who is interested in them.

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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:41 PM

Potatoes were brought to the New World through the Columbian Exchange. It does have a negative connotation but the trade route was used to diffuse cultures by trading food. 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 5:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:57 PM

Potatoes are one of the most widespread foods in the world, due to its resiliency to harsh weather conditions and its ability to grow to large sizes. Potatoes can also be traced to show the beginning forces of globalization. Before modern communication and transportation technology, globalization occurred at a much slower rate. Globalization spread through trade routes in the forms of foods, resources, and therefore cultures and people. 

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Why leave the West for India?

Why leave the West for India? | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Rising numbers of people of Indian origin born in the West are moving to the country their parents left decades ago in search of opportunity and a cultural connection, reports the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan.

 

Since 2005, the Indian government has been encouraging people of Indian descent and former Indian nationals to return to India.  For many Indians living in the UK, there are more and better economic opportunities for them within India.   Migrants have many reasons for moving (including cultural factors), but the primary pull factor is most certainly India's ascendant importance in the global economy and rising IT industries. 

 

Tags: India, South Asia, migration, immigration, Europe, colonialism, unit 2 population. 


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:43 PM

This article demonstrates the need to leave and create a better life for not only this family but for other families that feel as if their life and societial views are putting their future in jeapody. There is a rising number of people from India that are moving to the West; where their parents were born and restaring their lives there. They are in a sense coming home to what they had left behind.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:37 PM

As the article says, India is encouraging more people of Indian descent to return to India because of the opportunities that have become increasingly available within the country due to its  westernization . Aside from the corruption and poverty that are in India, the country has not seen any signs of these opportunities stopping.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:42 PM

With the rise in globalization and the IT industry, it is obvious that there is opportunity for success.  Many traveled to the US for economic opportunity, however many companies and IT departments are being outsourced to India, thus taking jobs away from the US.  

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The price of passage

The price of passage | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Almost 35,000 people have reached the shores of Italy and Malta in 2013 and two-thirds have filed for asylum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:00 PM

This interactive map/infographic is a wealth of information about migration to Europe. 


TagsEurope, migration, economic, labor, infographic

Jennifer Lopez's curator insight, November 7, 2014 10:51 AM

This passage was about the immigration that are coming into Europe. It helped me learn how they get to there destination and the struggles they go through. This scoop also showed me thew amount of money a immigrant would have to spend in or for them to get to their destination. By it showing us statistics i can get a better understanding. Also, the statistics about the amount of immigrants that don't get to even make it to their destination and what they can and cannot bring with them.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 1:41 PM

Due to the vast distances and irregular manner of transportation to Europe, prices are very high with transport between northern Africa and southern Europe often costing more than 1000 dollars. Even traveling from Greece to Italy can cost up to 6000 dollars. Despite the high price to "guarantee access", the journey is still dangerous with 500 deaths over a two month period in 2013. This interactive shows that even though 35,000 seems like a lot of people to arrive in Europe in 2013, it is a very long, difficult, and expensive journey to get there.

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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Edison High - AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

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Political Geography review

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.