Interesting Insects
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Rescooped by Marianne Shockley from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Whitepaper_Insect_meal.pdf


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Cheryl Preyer's curator insight, August 20, 2014 8:51 AM

Bugs in animal feed - for animals that naturally eat bugs!

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The Future of Food: Edible Insects - Field and Feast

The Future of Food: Edible Insects - Field and Feast | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

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Insects as a tool for global food security

Insects as a tool for global food security | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
The potential of insects as human food and animal feed to assure global food security and availability of animal proteins in a sustainable way has been the main focus of the first conference Insects to feed the world in the Netherlands. The main observation is that insects as food and feed receive ample attention and that developments are fast. Several major investments in the sector were announced during the conference. The topic is intensively discussed by regulators to prepare for these new developments.

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Glenn Cardwell: Entomophagy - dining on insects

Glenn Cardwell: Entomophagy - dining on insects | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

Entomophagy is the practice of eating insects as a food source. Over 1000 species of insects are eaten around the world by traditional human societies in Africa, the Americas and Australasia


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Insect-eating research - Four Fascinating Moments from the International Association of Culinary Professionals Conference | miamidish.net

Insect-eating research - Four Fascinating Moments from the International Association of Culinary Professionals Conference | miamidish.net | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

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Ana C. Day's curator insight, March 23, 2014 12:33 PM

"Ben Reade is the director of culinary research at Nordic Food Lab, founded by Rene Redzepi. Reade was in betweeninsect-eating research visits in Australia and Mexico.  He told of eating tobacco crickets and termites in Uganda as well as one of the most exciting insects he’s tried–a termite queen. “It’s a solid wobbling sausage of fat,” Reade proclaimed with delight."

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BUGS ON THE MENU: 291 FILM COMPANY TRAVELS TO AFRICA TO FILM INSECTS AS FOOD DOCUMENTARY | Cinematic Television

BUGS ON THE MENU: 291 FILM COMPANY TRAVELS TO AFRICA TO FILM INSECTS AS FOOD DOCUMENTARY  | Cinematic Television | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

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Ana C. Day's curator insight, March 25, 2014 6:17 AM

(Victoria, BC) Victoria-based 291 Film Company is about to embark on the production of Bugs on the Menu, a documentary about using insects as an alternate food source. The documentary will take Gemini Award-winning director/cinematographer Ian Toewsto South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Botswana where he will film people harvesting Mopane caterpillars, grasshoppers, and makeke (soldier termites) for food. Toews will also travel to Amsterdam to interview Professor Arnold van Huis, one of the authors of the UN paper “Edible Insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security.” Shooting begins Monday, March 24th.

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Columbia University Press » Blog Archive » “There’s no reason we shouldn’t be eating insects. They’re much better for you than regular meat.”

Columbia University Press » Blog Archive » “There’s no reason we shouldn’t be eating insects. They’re much better for you than regular meat.” | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

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Columbia University Press » Blog Archive » Cooking with Insects — Recipes for Hopper Kebabs and Buglava

Columbia University Press » Blog Archive » Cooking with Insects — Recipes for Hopper Kebabs and Buglava | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

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Insects: Innovation To Produce Food Proteins For An Increasing...

Insects: Innovation To Produce Food Proteins For An Increasing... | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
One of the biggest challenges facing the food industry is the increase in population and the difficulty of feeding and generating sufficient protein for a world population expected to reach nine billion people by 2050.

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The Cricket Village

The Cricket Village | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
Khepri is launching a groundbreaking campaign in order to fund multiple cricket farms in Lao PDR in partnership with an NGO

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Insect recipe book author offers some new lunch recommendations - The Japan Times

Insect recipe book author offers some new lunch recommendations - The Japan Times | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
Insect recipe book author offers some new lunch recommendations
The Japan Times
I didn't have any experience eating grasshoppers as a child, as some kids living in rural areas might. Scenes of entomophagy occasionally pop up in anime and manga.

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The Future of Food: 10 Edible Insects

The Future of Food: 10 Edible Insects | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
#10 Texas & Thai Fusion: Katydids Combine Texas Katydids with green onions, coconut oil and Thai seasoning, then stuff them into mushroom caps and you’ve got yourself more than an exotic meal! Some...

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7 Foods We Should Be Eating But Aren't

7 Foods We Should Be Eating But Aren't | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
There are many healthy and environmentally-friendly foods that still haven't gone mainstream in the United States.

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Ana C. Day's curator insight, January 3, 2014 4:01 AM

"3. BUGS

Roughly 2 billion people around the world, mostly in tropical regions, consume insects as a viable protein source. But, in the United States, edible insects like beetles, wasps, caterpillars, grasshoppers, and worms, have yet to shed their "yuck" factor.

 

In May of this year, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization reported that eating bugs could reduce world hunger (insects are easy to raise and there are lots of them), help the environment (insects use less water than pigs or cows and feed on waste materials), and provide a good source of nutrition (insects are packed with protein).

At home, there is growing interest in specialty items like granola bars made with cricket flour and scientists are working on creative recipes to make insects more appetizing. Insect farming, however, is not a big business and "consumer disgust" is still a barrier to getting Americans to regularly eat insects."

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Could Insects Feed the Hungry World of Tomorrow?

Could Insects Feed the Hungry World of Tomorrow? | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
BBCFUTURE Insects Feed the Hungry World of Tomorrow?, BBC, July 10More and more of the world is clamouring for protein. But our land and water resources are coming under increasing strain to farm e...

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Eat Grub - Experience the culinary delights of insects and worms - Flux Magazine

Eat Grub - Experience the culinary delights of insects and worms - Flux Magazine | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
For the brave among you, and those who are keen to try something new, Eat Grub is certainly unlike any other food experience you’ll have in London...

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Entomophagy – What´s in it for us? | Iris

Entomophagy – What´s in it for us? | Iris | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

There is sufficient food production worldwide in 2014 to feed the population, however the current path of increasing demand for meat and protein-rich food sources is not a sustainable way forward.

There are many alternative protein sources with scaling up possibilities, insects or bugs being one of the most efficient options. Insects (entomos in Greek, i.e. that which is cut in pieces or segmented) are emerging in Western countries as viable mini-livestock for food and feed, however they have been cultivated for over 4000 years in other parts of the world.


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How To Make A Mealworm Pizza (VIDEO) - Huffington Post

How To Make A Mealworm Pizza (VIDEO) - Huffington Post | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

Insect gourmet Daniella Martin shows how to make a pizza with mealworms.


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Entomophagy - dining on insects

Entomophagy - dining on insects | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
Entomophagy - dining on insects: Entomophagy is the practice of eating insects as a food source. Over 1000 species of insects are eaten around the world by traditional human societies in Africa, the Americas and Australasia. The Food and Agricultural Organisation estimated that two billi

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Nutritious Protein Bars with a New, Sustainable Ingredient: Cricket Flour

Nutritious Protein Bars with a New, Sustainable Ingredient: Cricket Flour | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
A couple of Williamsburg roommates have just launched Exo: a protein bar–producing company named for the exoskeleton of its key ingredient.

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Recent Graduates Want Bugs on America’s Dinner Tables | News | The Harvard Crimson

Recent Graduates Want Bugs on America’s Dinner Tables | News | The Harvard Crimson | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

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Assessment of Nutritional Quality and Anti-Nutrient Composition of Two Edible Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) - A Search for New Food Alternative

Assessment of Nutritional Quality and Anti-Nutrient Composition of Two Edible Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) - A Search for New Food Alternative | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it

See Art 59. 3-5

 

Mousumi Das Suman Kalyan Mandal


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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, December 22, 2013 2:01 PM

Abstract : "Edible insects are a natural renewable resource of food that could solve the problem of food scarcity. The level of some nutrients and anti-nutrients of two grasshoppers were determined in order to ascertain their suitability as a food and feed source. Spathosternum prasiniferum prasiniferum contained the highest crude protein content of 65.15% while Chrotogonus trachypterus trachypterus had the lowest value of 59.63%. Crude fat and crude fibre content was highest in C. trachypterus trachypterus. Compared with the amino acid profile recommended by FAO/WHO, the grasshopper protein of studies species were of high quality due to its high content of essential amino acids. In fatty acid profile lenolenic acid was the most abundant followed by lenoleic acid. Moisture and energy contents were significantly higher in S. prasiniferum prasiniferum. A higher value of ash content was recorded in S. prasiniferum prasiniferum, corresponding to contain high proportions of sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium and iron. S. prasiniferum prasiniferum gave higher value for Retinol, Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin. The anti-nutrients of the two studied species were generally low and far below the toxic level of human.Both the grasshoppers could serve as an alternative source of nutrient supplements in human diet."

 

Link : http://www.tjprc.org/download.php?fname=--1386077945-5.%20Assessment%20of%20nutritional.full.pdf

 

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San Francisco Bay Pictures : Bizarre Foods America : Travel Channel

San Francisco Bay Pictures : Bizarre Foods America : Travel Channel | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
Go behind the scenes with Andrew Zimmern in San Francisco to sample cookies made with crickets, lamb's head soup and more.

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A Day in the Life Of... | FOUR Magazine

A Day in the Life Of... | FOUR Magazine | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
We hear from Daniel Imrie-Situnayake, cofounder of Tiny Farms

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Entomophagy -- American restaurants with bugs and insects on their menus.

Entomophagy -- American restaurants with bugs and insects on their menus.

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Insect Meat To Meet The Global Food Demands In 2050

Insect Meat To Meet The Global Food Demands In 2050 | Interesting Insects | Scoop.it
In year 2050 there will be an estimated 9 billion people and a billion hungry people on the planet. To feed everyone, current food production will need to almost double and we will need 30% more water.

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Ana C. Day's curator insight, January 1, 2014 1:43 AM

"So, what about insect meat? Insect meat can be a sustainable nutritious solution to feeding the world’s population. Not only to solve hunger but as part of a regular diet in western countries. Insects are the most plentiful form of life on the planet, four-fifths of all known organisms, with more than 1,900 species used as food currently. Insect meat is a staple of the diets for at least two billion people, primarily in Africa, the Pacific and Latin America. Insects are often consumed whole as a delicacy, but can also be ground into flour. This insect flour can be used to make bread, soups, sauces, stews or meat products like nuggets and burgers."