Edible insects
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Nutritional composition and safety aspects of edible insects

Nutritional composition and safety aspects of edible insects | Edible insects | Scoop.it

Via Jacques Mignon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 6:52 AM

Rumpold & Schlüter - 2013 - Molecular Nutrition & Food Research - Wiley Online Library

 

"Insects, a traditional food in many parts of the world, are highly nutritious and especially rich in proteins and thus represent a potential food and protein source. A compilation of 236 nutrient compositions in addition to amino acid spectra and fatty acid compositions as well as mineral and vitamin contents of various edible insects as derived from literature is given and the risks and benefits of entomophagy are discussed. Although the data were subject to a large variation, it could be concluded that many edible insects provide satisfactorily with energy and protein, meet amino acid requirements for humans, are high in MUFA and/or PUFA, and rich in several micronutrients such as copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorous, selenium, and zinc as well as riboflavin, pantothenic acid, biotin, and in some cases folic acid. Liabilities of entomophagy include the possible content of allergenic and toxic substances as well as antinutrients and the presence of pathogens. More data are required for a thorough assessment of the nutritional potential of edible insects and proper processing and decontamination methods have to be developed to ensure food safety."

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Nutritional Ecology of Entomophagy in Human and Other Primates

Annu. Rev. Entomol. 2013. 58:141–60
Abstract :
Entomophagy is widespread among nonhuman primates and is common among many human communities. However, the extent and patterns of entomophagy vary substantially both in humans and nonhuman primates. Here we synthesize the literature to examine why humans and other primates eat insects and what accounts for the variation in the extent to which they do so. Variation in the availability of insects is clearly important, but less understood is the role of nutrients in entomophagy. We apply a multidimensional analytical approach, the right-angled mixture triangle, to published data on the macronutrient compositions of insects to address this. Results showed that insects eaten by humans spanned a wide range of protein-to-fat ratios but were generally nutrient dense, whereas insects with high protein-to-fat ratios were eaten by nonhuman primates. Although suggestive, our survey exposes a need for additional, standardized, data.


Via Jacques Mignon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, January 17, 2013 3:39 AM

David Raubenheimer and Jessica M. Rothman

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Ethiopia: Managing food insecurity with entomophagy | BEDIM

Ethiopia: Managing food insecurity with entomophagy | BEDIM | Edible insects | Scoop.it
BEDIM's insight: "... The solution to all of these problems lies in entomophagy. Consuming insects may be the next option to help those suffering from the drought in order to ensure that they can still eat and survive.
John N. Kinyuru's insight:

Entomophagy holds key to food security in Sub-saharan Africa

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