EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War
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BEFORE, DURING, AFTER

BEFORE, DURING, AFTER | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
Jonathan McGlynn's insight:

The source that i choose to do my BDA for was the civilwar.org battlefield resource. I feel as though that this resource allows the students to do creative work, while showing that they understand the content and overarching themes and understandings of the Civil War Unit. This also will potentially be the most rewarding piece of work that the students will do in this unit, due to the fact that I have it structured as an independent study, where they will choose which battle they want to research, find out as much as they can about it using the documents in the database, and then connected the importance of that battle to the larger themes of the class. Thus, it is important for them to have a strong background in the Civil War, which is why this lesson would not be done until towards the end of the unit. 

 

The first thing that I would do is make sure that they have a strong, and firm foundation into the events of the Civil War, and the conditions through and from which the War came about from. Therefore, it is necessary to give some lectures detailing key people, events, situations, ideologies, and places during the Civil War. This can be accomplished using some interactive tools, such as a clip of Lincoln from Spielberg's movie of the same name, or possibly a few cartoon clips. In addition, i think that it would be very important to give a brief demonstartion of how the database works, so that they would be be going off to do their work blind. This modeling will serve as a basis for how they are supposed to go about conducting their own research. 

 

During their research, i would show them an example. Using a major battle, such as Gettysburg, for example, I would detail what happened, why it happened, when it happened, and who was involved as well as the outcome. Then i would ask what does this mean in the context of the Civil War, and then finally I would ask why does this matter. This will show students how to think critically, and ask thought provoking questions that will help them to make their analysis stronger as well. In addition to providing this example and demonstartion I would also be walking around to students that needed some guidence and answering questions from those that have them. (ideally this would be done in the school computer lab, thus letting them go off on their own, but still be able to have direct communication with me if they need anything) 

 

After i would have them come together as a class, and share their findings and how it related to the overall War. After, I would ask if anyones related to eachtohers and why, and then finally I would ask them if they could group themselves from most to least important battle. This may seem a tad trivial, and a waste of time, or too subjective, but it does not really matter, because what it will do is cause the students to activate their knowledge about the topic, and form arguments that are based in fact as to why each battle is more or less imporant. This activity will demostrate an understanding of the material, but will also demonstrate an understanding of how to critically analyze and synthesize text and content from different contexts and form them into a cohesive whole. It will also show that the students know how to support their own claims that are not based in opinion, but that are based in fact, and evidence from the texts. 

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Nursing in the Civil War

Nursing in the Civil War | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
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Culpepper, M.M. & Adams, P.G. (1988) Nursing in the civil war. The american journal of nursing, 88 (7), p.p.981-984. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/3425867


In this journal articel, Culpepper and Adams go over the history of women nurses during the Civil War and the impact that they had on the War itself. It shows the contributions that women made during the war, and how important they were in keeping the spirits and health of wounded soldiers up. It also goes over diary and journal entries of some of the women who were nurses at major battles, and how they dealt with the hardships that they faced on a daily basis. I believe that my students would be able to do some great analysis on this work, due to the fact that it is straightforward and the writing is not complex at all. 

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Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

Gettysburg Address as recited by Jeff Daniels.
Jonathan McGlynn's insight:

Lincoln, A. (1863). Gettysburg address. Retreived from http://www.civilwar.org/education/teachers/lesson-plans/gettysburg-address-lesson-plan/gettysburg-address-worksheet.pdf

 

Arguably Lincoln's most memorable, and one of the most recognizable speechs of all time. Students will work with both the video and the text, and analyze what Lincoln is saying in the text, and what the importance of it is. They will be able to use the information that they have learned to put this speech into the context of when it was given. In addition, it is a nice break from the longer texts that i have assigned, and will be a shorter, more concise reading. I believe that students will be the strongest with this, due to the fact that it is very straighforward, and they will have a strong background and understanding of the events that preceeded the speech. 

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The Civil War: A Film by Ken Burns

The Civil War: A Film by Ken Burns | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
Jonathan McGlynn's insight:

Burns, K. (Director/Producer). (1990). The civil war: A film by ken burns [Motion Picture]. United States of America: PBS. 

 

The Civil War by Ken Burns is a PBS documentary film consiting of 9 episodes that detail the events of the Civil War. During the creation of the film, Ken worked in archives, and pulled around 16,000 primary source photos, journals, and diary entries for the series. It has a great deal of primary source information, and the way that it has been produced is outstanding. There is a wealth of information in this series, and would be extremely beneficial for students to watch this, as it takes a break from lecturing, and gives them another medium through which to comprehend the material. Unfortunately, one of the main areas of struggle is that, due to the fact that it does go so in depth, it consists of 9 episodes that are roughly an hour and fifteen minutes a piece, making the entire series have a run time of 11 hours and 30 minutes. Thus, it would be impossible to show every episode, but since it is broken down by section, it would be possible to use a video for one of the sections of the Civil War in lieu of a lecture, or a group activity. 

 

 

 

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Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era

Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
Jonathan McGlynn's insight:

McPherson, J. (1988). Battle cry of freedom: The civil war era. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. 

 

McPherson's book, Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, is an extensive text that documents events that preceeded the Civil War, up to the ending of the Civil War. It is a very deep text that encapsulates many different facets of the Civil War Era, including: politicals, social change, and military strategy. McPherson brings all of these together to give a comprehensive analysis of the Civil War Era. One of the things that students may have trouble with while using this text is the sheer amount of information. McPherson covers the Civil War Era in a great deal of depth, and if the students do not have a great understanding of events that occured during this time, it could be a potential area of trouble. 

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The Killer Angels: A Novel of the Civil War

The Killer Angels: A Novel of the Civil War | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
Jonathan McGlynn's insight:

Shaara, M. (1974). The killer angels. New York, NY: McKay.

 

The Killer Angels is a fictional historical novel that was written by Michael Shaara that tells the story of the Battle of Gettysburg during the Civil War. Although the story is fictional, the characters in the novel are real, and the events that occured are quite similar to the actual events of the Battle of Gettysburg. Thus, it can be used by students to teach them about the Battle of Gettysburg in a manner that is both intriguing and based on actual facts. Students may struggle with the fact that this is a fairly in depth account even though it is fictional. It may take them a little bit more time to get through the readings due to the fact that it is written at a bit of a higher reading level then some students will be used to. Also, it will take a decent amount of time to read through, while maintaining an understanding of what is occuring. 

 

 

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Reflection...

Reflection... | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
Jonathan McGlynn's insight:

A Quick Reflection... 

 

The Civil War was a bloody affair that ripped the country into two, pitted neighbor against neighbor, father against son, and sometimes brother against brother. It was emotionally charged, and was one of the most important events in the history of our great country. Even today, issues that the Civil War was fought over still have an impact on our daily lives. 

 

The sources that I have chose to use for this unit have great variety, and are so different than eachother in so many different ways. Yet, they are all woven together using the same threads, and the will complement eachother very well. Students will be able to gain knowledge from a variety of sources, and through a variety of mediums. The fact that the source base is so diverse will hopefully allow for the comprehension of the information by all different types of learners in the class room. In addition, all of the soruces allow for deep critical thinking and analysis exercises that will further the students grasp on the concepts, content, and overarching themes of the unit. 

 

 

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Civil War Battlefields - Learn About The American Civil War | Civil War Preservation Trust

Civil War Battlefields - Learn About The American Civil War | Civil War Preservation Trust | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
The Civil War Trust's Civil War battlefield page includes links to more than 100 various Civil War battles - history articles, battle maps, photos, expert videos, and more.
Jonathan McGlynn's insight:

 

Using this resource, I would want my students to find a battle that interested them, and write up a short report on the battle, and its implications in the Civil War. This website is very detailed, and although it does not include EVERY battle that was fought, it details many in very specific detail. Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the course material by relating it back to what we have discussed and researched in class to this point. I beleive that the biggest struggle would be the fact that students will be doing this independently and thus would be unable to reveice DIRECT assistance from myself. 

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Political Cartoon

Political Cartoon | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
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Harper's Weekly. Retreived from: http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/sites/blogdivided/2008/06/25/elections-through-the-eyes-of-harpers-weekly/

 

Using a political cartoon such as this would be a refreshing change of pace for the students during this unit. After going over the political atomosphere of the time, and towards the middle of the Unite, prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, i would give this to remind the students what was going on, and how the nation was expanding and what that meant for slavery. I would want them to identify the figures in this cartoon, and I would also want them to explain to me what it means, and how they know that based on evidence that they have seen throughout the class to this point. One of the weaknesses of this is that it does not fully encapsulate the problems of the time, and another is that the students may not recognize the people in the cartoon. 

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Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address

Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
Jonathan McGlynn's insight:

Lincoln, A. (1865). Second inaugural address. Retreived from http://www.bartleby.com/124/pres32.html

 

Students will be able to use this text in supplement to Lincoln's first inaugural address, and can compare and contrast the style and tone, and analyze why this has occured due to the events that have preceeded it. An area of strength that the students might have with this text is critically analyzing the differences between the first and second inaugural address. Since this would be given towards the end of the unit on the Civil War, prior to the unit on reconstruction, they should have enough background knowledge to be able to critically respond to the text. 

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Abraham Lincoln's First Inaugural Address

Abraham Lincoln's First Inaugural Address | EDCI-5080 Annotated Bibliography: The Civil War | Scoop.it
Jonathan McGlynn's insight:

Lincoln, A. (1861). Lincoln's first inaugural address. Retrieved from http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=25818

 

Lincoln's First Inagural Address occured on March 4, 1861. The speech was mainly a message to the South, which had several states that already had succeeded from the Union, and were essentially in open rebellion. Lincoln attempted to quell the nerves of the South, but ultimately, as history has shown, was unsuccessful. He detailed and suggested outcomes for the problems, and made clear that his position on slavery had been, and would stay the same; meaning he would not try to aboloish slavery in the South where it already existed. He also outlined the possible outcomes if the South were to actively take up arms against the Federal Government. It is in this speech that Lincoln's famous closing line comes from: "I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living hear and hearthstone all over this broad land will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surley they will be, by the better angels of our nature". Using this text could help students understand the gravity of the situation, and truly encapsulates the period of the 'unknown' prior to the actual fighting of the Civil War. It also will allow them to see a side of Lincoln that is not usually shown, due to the fact that it is common place to believe that from the outset that he was against slavery in all forms. 

 

 

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