EDCI397 Project Based Learning
37 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Hallie Lease from EDCI 397
onto EDCI397 Project Based Learning
Scoop.it!

The Global Teacher

The Global Teacher | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it

I have talked about the notion of "classroom teacher" vs. "school teacher" in posts before, and have begun to rethink this notion. …. 

 

So now I have started to think about the “global teacher“.  The global teacher has the best elements of the classroom and school teacher, but their focus is on “what is best for kids”, no matter if is their own kids, kids in the school across the street, or across the ocean.  They got into teaching because they love students and want to help every single one of them, no matter their situation or location.  They care for the kids in their classroom, they share openly with others in their school and connect with kids, but want to make things better past their own situation.  They inspire change whether it is with one classroom in another school, or thousands.  They also tap into others and bring the best to their students. The more we look at what others are doing, the better we can become for the students closest to us.


Via iEARN-USA, Sophia Vitilio
Hallie Lease's insight:

This article really describes the characteristics of a true global teacher :) It is wanting the best for all students, no matter who they are or where they are. Teachers that instill resistance in children, so they can in turn make a change or difference in the world on there own, no matter how small. 

more...
Lauren Yachera's curator insight, February 16, 2014 5:42 PM

Really interesting to see how teachers can really be divided up into groups based off of how involved they are with their students, their school, and the world. As the world keeps changing, it becomes more and more important for a teacher to keep in touch with what is going on not only in their student's lives, but in the world as well. Globally competent teachers are needed in order to keep up with the world.

Sophia Vitilio's curator insight, February 17, 2014 12:18 AM

 Just based from the title of this article, I have to say that if a goal of ours is to inspire globally competent students, then we as teachers have to also be global.  Based from this article, it tells that not only the students should be contributing, but teachers should also be contributing and making a difference for others.  I believe for this to be very important and hope that if teachers want their students to be globally competent, that they too take a step in the same direction.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Hallie Lease from EDCI 397
Scoop.it!

How to Integrate Social-Emotional Learning into Common Core

How to Integrate Social-Emotional Learning into Common Core | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it
Implementing the Common Core doesn’t mean educators have to abandon SEL—in fact, just the opposite might be true.

Via Jocelyn Stoller, Rebecca Haas
more...
Rebecca Haas's curator insight, February 19, 2014 2:23 PM

I am currently in a math class completely devoted to learning how to teach students proofs, so much of this information is relevant to me at the moment. Many of the socio-emotional skills that students should have, as laid out by the Common Core Standards, are crucial when teaching students how to write proofs, as it is all about discovery, discussion, and the ability to revise your own work. These are all skills that are necessary in the outside world and skills that should be taught in the classroom. The article explains that, despite what many educators may believe, the Common Core Standards require socio-emotional standards to be met, although it is up to the teacher how he or she goes about this task.

Scooped by Hallie Lease
Scoop.it!

Classroom Management Ms. Gray's Class

This video portrays bad classroom management and how to correct the mistakes. Created by Shannon Mahoney, Leah Gray, Roger Freed, Milton MacDonald, Jason Pea...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hallie Lease from EDCI397: PBL and Classroom Climate
Scoop.it!

Olson's Crafty Kinders: August 2011

Olson's Crafty Kinders: August 2011 | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it

Via Becky Vickers
more...
Becky Vickers's curator insight, March 11, 2014 10:58 AM

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN: This is a great example of having a variety of spaces within a classroom. This classroom has a writing center, important bulletin borders, tables, open carpet spaces, supply shelves, etc. In addition, the decor is very inviting and everything is clearly labeled so students know where things are. The behavior expectations are clear and the tree/board serve as a visible, physical reminder to students throughout the day. Similar to this set up, I would like to establish the norm of certain classroom expectations such as keeping the distinct areas clean for the next student to use. I also liked the norm of having visual reminders of expectations, having things clearly labeled and utilized everyday will solidify behavior and classroom expectations. 

Lauren Yachera's curator insight, March 11, 2014 4:55 PM

This pre-k classroom is impressive! After looking at all of the pictures the teacher has included, I am in awe that her and her students worked together to create such an interesting, colorful, and inviting classroom climate. It looks like everything is spacious and organized, something that is not only great for younger children, but for PBLs as well. Since PBL included a lot of hands on activities and movement, the great amount of space in the classroom allows for this to easily be done. They can see where everything needs to go, because everything seems so organized. The fact that both the teacher and the students collaborated to make such a fun classroom allows for relationships and cooperation to be built among everyone in the room. Everyone feels like they have a job and that they are important in the classroom. 

Rescooped by Hallie Lease from Principles and Methods of Teaching in Elementary Schools: Ali Harrington
Scoop.it!

Restoring the Soul and Skill of Educators Through Engaged Teaching

Restoring the Soul and Skill of Educators Through Engaged Teaching | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it
In the aftermath of the testing regimen, or just the headlong rush to the end of school, educators are loosening their collars, breathing heavy sighs of relief (or resignation), and contemplating wh (Why education must nurture the curiosity and hearts...

Via Alison Harrington
Hallie Lease's insight:

A powerful quote from this article "education takes a back seat to instruction." This article describes the engaged teacher. Too much, teachers are worried about teaching to the test, etc instead of truly educating their students. The engaged teachers involves, teaching respectful boundaries, the teacher really being there and being present, developing emotionally etc. These things are truly important to students, and they are skills that can be carried with them throughout life.  

more...
Alison Harrington's curator insight, February 19, 2014 11:01 AM

such an encouraging read! despite the culture of standardized testing and lecturing, we must remember  why we do what we do as educators. engaged learning will help teachers to find the balance between education and instruction. "together, the five dimensions nourish and support the development of the whole student -- healthy heart, mind, and inner life -- that we feel is the foundation of academic learning". 

Lauren Yachera's curator insight, March 11, 2014 5:09 PM

This was  a really interesting and eye-opening article to come across. I remember at my 280 internship last year, my mentor teacher seemed exasperated at times when she realized that all she would be doing for the next few weeks would be lecturing her students on how to do well on their MSAs. She told me that it was the same thing day after day, and besides her being bored with the same old regimen, her students also seemed pretty bored. This article explains that it's beyond important for teacher to nourish and support not only the intellectual development of their students, but their social-emotional and character development as well. Teachers really need to find the balance between all of these components in order to ensure the success of their students. Engaged teaching is the topic at hand; everyone must be engaged in learning, not just instruction and reading off lessons to their students . Curiosity must be nurtured, deep learning must occur. Basically, teachers must be able to educate their students, not just engage them in a testing program. They must (as the title of the article explains) "restore the soul and skill of educators through engaged teaching."

Rescooped by Hallie Lease from Apps for Educators
Scoop.it!

Create a successful classroom climate

Create a successful classroom climate | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it

How to create a classroom climate that will help your students become successful learners.


Via Cheryl Irish
Hallie Lease's insight:

Teachers are responsible for creating a comfortable learning environment for children. These tips and strategies are perfect guide for teachers to show how to create the right environment for students, and what students need to learn in the best way. 

more...
Lauren Jackson's curator insight, March 10, 2014 1:20 PM

I re-scooped this article from Sydney's page. I'm sure all of us have experienced classroom environments that are negative, positive, and in between. When I think of a comfortable classroom environment I automatically think about positive teacher student relationships. I didn't realize that student student relationships are equally as important. It is not about the quantity, but the quality of relationships within your classroom.The relationships must be genuine and important to students to further interactive learning. As a young teacher, it is critical that I am consistent in my methods. Students need warm, approachable teachers to ask questions. Even when I am feeling overwhelmed, I will not let my emotions control my interaction with students, for it can have a negative impact on the classroom climate.

jessica slater's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:09 PM

Creating a successful classroom climate has many educational benefits. Most importantly, in a successful classroom, students are able to enhance learning. In my classroom, I would like to create a "warm" environment by being approachable and supportive. I would also consider changing the physical space into a more "warm" atmosphere. Having a "warm" environment enhances the quality of learning within the classroom. In addition to creating a "warm" environment, being enthusiastic and having high expectations for my students also contribute to creating a successful classroom climate in the classroom. These factors will help me create a positive classroom climate so that I can maximize the potential of my students.

Sophia Vitilio's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:44 PM

Creating a certain climate for the classroom is very important to show that learning is and will be highly valued.  By having quality relationships, a smooth running classroom, and having personal development for students as keys, these can help to create positive classroom climates.  This is a climate I would want to have in my classroom because I believe that it is best for students to learn in a positive environment.

Scooped by Hallie Lease
Scoop.it!

Curious Homework: An Inquiry Project for Students and Parents

Curious Homework: An Inquiry Project for Students and Parents | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it
International educator Scot Hoffman is a big believer in the power of curiosity to drive learning. After nearly two decades of teaching around the globe, he also realizes that school isn't always so h
Hallie Lease's insight:

"The Curiosity Project" is a way for teachers to learn more about their students and what interests them. When students have a choice in what they learn, they can become much more engaged in the topic and thus the information becomes more meaningful to them. Children are curious about the world and everything in it, if teachers devote time to find out some specifics, they can guide their lessons to help their students learn. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hallie Lease
Scoop.it!

Project Based Learning Ideas & Resources Help You Kick-Start PBL

Project Based Learning Ideas & Resources Help You Kick-Start PBL | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it
Come this way to free resources, ideas, and lesson plans for project based learning at all grade levels. My experience with PBL has been that kids love the projects and are fully engaged.
Hallie Lease's insight:

I think this is a great resource for teachers to use and communicate together on their different ideas and lessons for PBL. This website gave a great definition of what PBL really is, and has multiple examples divided into subjects areas for PBL lessons. It can be a great resource for beginner teachers who are newly creating lesson plans to integrate PBL. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hallie Lease
Scoop.it!

Better Living: Open Circle- Social and Emotional Learning

Students in Boston Public Schools are taking part in Open Circle, which empowers them to promote positive behaviors and healthy relationships at school and i...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hallie Lease
Scoop.it!

Focus on Collaboration to Kick Off New School Year

Focus on Collaboration to Kick Off New School Year | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it
The following is an excerpt from PBL for 21st Century Success: Teaching Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Communication, and Creativity, published this summer by the Buck Institute for Education. Pr
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hallie Lease from EDCI397: PBL and Classroom Climate
Scoop.it!

Setting Up for Second: Mid-year Update: Alternative Seating

Setting Up for Second: Mid-year Update: Alternative Seating | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it

Via Becky Vickers
more...
Lauren Yachera's curator insight, March 11, 2014 5:00 PM

I really liked that everything in the classroom seems like it was accommodated for the student's well being; the tables were lowered to "kid size" and no space really seems to be wasted for any unknown reason. Everything is set up for a specific reason. The concept of alternative seating was really interesting to me, because growing up, we always were placed in assigned (and uncomfortable) seats, and maybe only switched around once or twice throughout the year. The teacher in this article allows her students to sit on the floor while they do work, read standing up by the book shelves, and so on. By giving them the autonomy (to a certain extent) to do work in a way that will work for them, the teacher is creating a fun and successful classroom climate. Although I would really need to think about how to implement some of the ideas implemented in this article, I would really like to experiment with some of the arrangements that were included in it. 

Alison Harrington's curator insight, March 13, 2014 7:01 AM

a classroom set up is always on the fore front of the mind the week before the first day of school. however, this article highlight how important the concept of "updating is". our class needs may change as our students evolve and develop as learners and a mid year update can help support success, including ideas of alternative seating. students should be able to have a classroom environment where they can choose and have autonomy. everything should have a purpose in  the classroom and we shouldn't waste space. 

Becca Wagman's curator insight, March 14, 2014 1:07 AM

Classroom Climate: This article really enhanced the physical spaces of the classroom. It is important to make students feel comfortable in the classroom and be able to have different spaces for different tasks. These classroom ideas really take advantage of the spaces in the classroom and it keeps all the resources accessible for the students to find when they need them. I especially liked the low table and the colorful rug. It is important to make the classroom bright and cheery and youthful in order to keep the students excited about learning. In regards to project-based learning, these classroom ideas help to keep the classroom open for learning and for students to take advantage of the resources in the classroom for further learning and research. (SPACE)

Rescooped by Hallie Lease from Education: EDCI397
Scoop.it!

Key Factors in Creating a Positive Classroom Climate > Committee for Children

Key Factors in Creating a Positive Classroom Climate > Committee for Children | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it

Via Lauren Jackson, Lauren Yachera
Hallie Lease's insight:

An important part of the classroom beyond the academics are the relationships that are created through students and their teacher. Before a teacher can go into instruction, they need to form the base of their relationships with their students. This develops respect and a connection with those in the class. If students feel respected and connected with their peers and students they can more easily learn, and be comfortable to ask questions. Teachers should be the facilitators for positive relationships. 

more...
Lauren Jackson's curator insight, March 7, 2014 12:33 PM

This article acknowledged a huge misconception regarding classroom environment. Some teachers may settle with "I get the students I get, and nothing can change that." We need to highlight that the classroom climate is created by all members of the class. I believe the students play an essential role in the climate, but positive student teacher relationships are even more vital. As a student teacher, when entering a new classroom, I can almost immediately get a feel for the classroom climate. In particular, one classroom I worked in had a negative environment, with few peer and teacher relationships. It made it unenjoyable for me to be there, so I can only imagine the impact on student achievement. 

Lauren Yachera's curator insight, March 11, 2014 5:17 PM

This article really explained some ways to create a positive classroom climate. One thing that stood out to me immediately was that classroom climate doesn't just happen, it is created by everyone in the classroom. Collaboration and communication are key factors in creating this type of environment; everyone is allowed to work together to share ideas, stories, standards, and tones that makes the classroom a safe, respectful, welcoming, and supportive environment. The pie chart was a good addition to the article visually. It shows that each component works equally together to create a positive classroom climate; one factor does not dominate over others. While rules and norms are important to be developed and upheld, a teacher must be able to create and maintain positive relationships with all of their students, as well as 'promote positive peer relationships. Though it may seem obvious- the word "positive" is the dominant factor of all of this. A negative classroom climate may lead to hostile attitudes between students and teachers. Everyone should feel welcome and encouraged in their classroom, not upset and volatile.

Rescooped by Hallie Lease from EDCI397
Scoop.it!

The Differences Between Projects And Project-Based Learning - Edudemic

The Differences Between Projects And Project-Based Learning - Edudemic | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it
There's a big difference between using projects in the classroom versus project-based learning in the classroom. What are those differences, you ask?

Via Nicole Liebler
Hallie Lease's insight:

All throughout my public schooling we did "projects" just like the ones described in this article. And I remember feeling like the projects were just busywork, and that they didn't really relate to me. I remember questioning why we were even learning about some of the things we did. This article really describes the big differences between projects and project based learning. PBLs mean so much more to students, and the teachers. A teacher who does PBLs should have confidence in the fact that his/her students are much more likely to remember the information being taught, and use what they learn in other ways and times of their lives. 

more...
Nicole Liebler's curator insight, February 19, 2014 12:06 AM

I found this source to be particularly helpful in distinguishing the features of projects from project-based learning, since the difference confuses me sometimes. Some of the most helpful points I took away from this source are that PBL includes collaboration, continued inquiry, a general need/interest to know, relevance to students' lives, a focus on the PROCESS of learning, real world applications, and presentation of the discoveries. While projects can include some of these aspects as well, I think the main idea of this chart is to emphasize that PBL is more focused on student-driven inquiry about driving questions. After reading this chart, I have started to consider how to implement more PBL-like experiences into my classroom, as opposed to projects. I think it is important for me to learn more about how to assess students during their process of learning, as opposed to emphasizing their "products" because PBL focuses on the fact that students are learning AS they are doing it.

Sophia Vitilio's curator insight, February 19, 2014 12:24 AM

 I personally really like this article because it helps to distinct projects from project based learning, which I think can be very important for someone who does not know much about it or is just learning about it.   This really shows the differences between how a project is just something that is done for a grade and does not have as much relevance where as a project based learning project has relevance and is stimulating.  I really hope that the more I learn about project based learning, the more I will be able to incorporate it into my future classroom because this article proves to me how important it truly is.

Rescooped by Hallie Lease from EDCI 397
Scoop.it!

The Global Teacher

The Global Teacher | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it

I have talked about the notion of "classroom teacher" vs. "school teacher" in posts before, and have begun to rethink this notion. …. 

 

So now I have started to think about the “global teacher“.  The global teacher has the best elements of the classroom and school teacher, but their focus is on “what is best for kids”, no matter if is their own kids, kids in the school across the street, or across the ocean.  They got into teaching because they love students and want to help every single one of them, no matter their situation or location.  They care for the kids in their classroom, they share openly with others in their school and connect with kids, but want to make things better past their own situation.  They inspire change whether it is with one classroom in another school, or thousands.  They also tap into others and bring the best to their students. The more we look at what others are doing, the better we can become for the students closest to us.


Via iEARN-USA, Sophia Vitilio
Hallie Lease's insight:

This article really describes the characteristics of a true global teacher :) It is wanting the best for all students, no matter who they are or where they are. Teachers that instill resistance in children, so they can in turn make a change or difference in the world on there own, no matter how small. 

more...
Lauren Yachera's curator insight, February 16, 2014 5:42 PM

Really interesting to see how teachers can really be divided up into groups based off of how involved they are with their students, their school, and the world. As the world keeps changing, it becomes more and more important for a teacher to keep in touch with what is going on not only in their student's lives, but in the world as well. Globally competent teachers are needed in order to keep up with the world.

Sophia Vitilio's curator insight, February 17, 2014 12:18 AM

 Just based from the title of this article, I have to say that if a goal of ours is to inspire globally competent students, then we as teachers have to also be global.  Based from this article, it tells that not only the students should be contributing, but teachers should also be contributing and making a difference for others.  I believe for this to be very important and hope that if teachers want their students to be globally competent, that they too take a step in the same direction.

Scooped by Hallie Lease
Scoop.it!

How Can We Teach and Assess Creativity and Innovation in PBL? | Blog | Project Based Learning | BIE

How Can We Teach and Assess Creativity and Innovation in PBL? | Blog | Project Based Learning | BIE | EDCI397 Project Based Learning | Scoop.it
Project-based learning & classroom culture: #creativity and #innovation http://t.co/Cp9P9qCNxk via @biepbl
Hallie Lease's insight:

I love how this article describes the importance of creativity in PBL's. Since creativity is thought to be an innate skill, I thought it was very interesting how the article described how teachers can nurture and mold children into being "creative" in their own way. Having children brain storm and problem solve to find a new solution or improvement is a great way for children to be creative and original thinkers. 

more...
Nicole Liebler's curator insight, February 16, 2014 7:07 PM

I like how this post highlights the importance of fostering creativity in a PBL environment and emphasizes  process over product. Usually we always think of the outcome of creativity to be some sort of impressive product, but this post considers ways to assess creativity through the MEANS by which the result was reached. This is important because some people are more naturally creative than others, and it becomes difficult to distinguish effort from ability. I think this would be a good read for teachers trying to scaffold creativity in their PBL classrooms because it gives suggestions for how to provide students with opportunities to enhance their creative thinking, a necessary skill for 21st century learners.