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5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know

5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know | EDCI397 | Scoop.it

"Most teachers and current textbooks offer varied approaches to the material to be learned so the teaching can be brain-compatible with the varied student learning styles. It is only logical that respect for these individual learning styles be incorporated into assessment forms."


Via Beth Dichter, Dennis T OConnor
Christopher Resetar's insight:

Like other comments on this scoop, I really like this article, especially items #1 and #2.  I really like those options because they are unconventional options that I still think would provide an appropriate level of challenge for the students as well as provide an alternative form of just a simple pencil and paper exam.  I think option #1 is more feasible for elementary school because it would allow students to work on skills that are more age appropriate like consolidation of information and looking for quality source material.

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Steve Vaitl's curator insight, February 13, 2014 9:13 AM

For my teaching friends. Go beyond memorization and help your students climb "Bloom's Ladder"!!

Ruby Day's curator insight, February 14, 2014 3:45 PM

Sounds like some great ideas to stimulate critical thinking

Audrey's curator insight, March 5, 2014 6:51 PM

All 5 assessment methods involves  students leading the learning. Asking the students questions based on their reading of the topic helps their analytical  skills and allows them to be in charge of their learning. 

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Setting Up Your Classroom

Christopher Resetar's insight:

In my classroom I would like students to enter with an attitude that is conducive to learning and that encourages them to be prepared class.  This link has strategies for orientating space in order to make students feel comfortable and safe something that I think is crucial to student's outlooks on learning.  Under the first tab, tips for getting started, there are several suggestions that encourage the teacher to allow students to get involved.  Throughout the semester we have learned how making decisions makes children more resilient as they are forced to think critically about what rules will work and how there decisions would effect them.  In my ideal classroom I have areas were students could read freely as well as areas were students could write in journals to reflect on how they feel about the text.

 

Another norm that I would like to establish in my classroom is for the students to try something new on a regular basis (in other words, be flexible).  Therefore some of the suggestions under the second tab would perfect.  Using bookshelves to separate different books and areas would encourage students to select a new book topic or a new way to figure out the problems that they face in class.  Also, this links the last norm in that children have decisions to make about what types of books they want to read and in what ways they have problems.  In my ideal classroom, I would rotate different genres books every couple of weeks as well as change the different learning areas as well.

 

While this link covers many parts of my plan including several of the norms I would like to establish and the spaces I would like to create, I need to look for a source that talks about classroom routines more in depth because this source does not.  My preliminary ideas about classroom routines would be that students should have some choice in the learning center they would go to as I know that it often does not take one day to finish a book or to write a journal.  But at the same time I know students need to diversify their experience therefore routines are what I will look for next in my classroom climate plan.

 

 

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The Ultimate Teacher’s Guide to Organizing a Classroom Library

The Ultimate Teacher’s Guide to Organizing a Classroom Library | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Okay. Confession time. I LOVE books. I mean, I really, really, really love books. I know most teachers do, so I thought I’d share with you what I did to organize my classroom library. [Warnin...
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The classroom library is, for me, one of the most important parts of the classroom environment because I truly believe that every student can find a book that they will like, enjoy and will be able to read on their own.  I this piece the author takes a teacher through a step by step process of creating a classroom library beggining with how to acquire quality reading materials and ending with how to organize them within your class.  Many ideas I noticed in this article I had already thought of using for my classroom library such as the organization systems and finding books at book sales.  However, I had never before thought of organizing the classroom library as a process that required this much care. 

 

There is one area where I do disagree with the author and that is with the categories.  While having lots of different genres is ok, having all those different organizations of books might be overwhelming for a child and make a good book for them hard to find.  I think that the number of categories for books should be limited with some switching going on every couple of weeks..  This gives the students choice while at the same time allowing the teacher to control what the students read to some extent.  

 

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Focus Walls in the Elementary Classroom

Focus Walls in the Elementary Classroom | EDCI397 | Scoop.it

with to many words It seems that many classrooms today have less and less student work displayed and more and more focus walls. This article describes what a focus wall might look like and why it is so important to have one in your class.

Christopher Resetar's insight:

This article discusses the idea of having focus walls in the classroom. While I have never been the more art oriented person I always found wall displays that I could use as a quick reference very helpful when I was in the class. In this specific article, the author discusses many ways in which teachers can use focus walls to help students in the classroom. I agree with most of the points the author makes about creating an environment that is conducive to learning and showing the kids that when they are in the classroom learning is important and paramount.

I do have one problem with this article when it comes to discussing classroom climate. The author seems to go a little bit overboard with the focus wall idea. I know that kids I have worked with have told me in the past that boards

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Sample Class Norms

Christopher Resetar's insight:

This is only a short list of norms that I found on the University of Vermont website but I think that all of these norms are very general and can be used to develop other norms that can be used in the classroom.  I especially like to see how the classroom norms can change from year to year as the students grow and develop to become more mature students that are capable of understanding more complex norms.  The last thing that I think makes this list useful is that it differentiates between what a norm is and a routine is.  Sometimes the two terms run together in my mind and it seems like the words are referring to the same thing.

 

Ultimately, as a mentioned earlier, I think that the norms that are listed by grade are useful guidelines for any teacher who is planning to use norms in their classroom.  Since I would like to teach 4-5 grade to norms from that category stood out to me.  Be willing to try new things and help each other learn.  Those two norms stood out to me the most of the five on that list because the first three are common sense and feel more like rules to me, these two norms seem like they are more conducive with promoting an environment of global competency that will benefit every kid in a classroom,

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Classroom Environment Plan: Tools and Procedures - Helene Tack's Portfolio

Classroom Environment Plan: Tools and Procedures - Helene Tack's Portfolio | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Christopher Resetar's insight:

I think this article is really good because not only does this teacher provide a method for how to manage the classroom climate but she also incorporates several of the principals of resiliency into this description.  First, this teacher believes in a very structured classroom that has a strong focus on establish behaviors really early in the year.  However, she establishes behaviors that have real meaning such as organization requirements.  These are skills that students will need in any job that they will get.  Additionally, this teacher explains the rationale behind her behaviors so that students understand and are more likely to follow what the teacher says.

 

While I do agree with most of the points that this teacher makes I think her classroom almost seems too structured.  As someone who appreciates unstructured time myself, I think that there are a lot of benefits that students would not be able to enjoy in this teacher's class because it is so structured.  However, I really do like how see explains the rationale for her rules which I think would definitely help the students understand why certain behaviors exist. 

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Create a successful classroom climate.

Create a successful classroom climate. | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Creating a positive classroom climate and a supportive environment will help your students become successful learners.
Christopher Resetar's insight:

The interesting part of this article is that it talks about classroom climate beyond just a physical sense of the word which is how I had always thought of it before.  The two other components to classroom climate that this article describes are  personal development and personal relationships.  These tie into the whole child principles that we are trying to develop in our class, especially health and safety.

 

Because of this article I see teaching from a whole new perspective and now realize that something that I intended to do anyway in my classroom is now something that benefits my students greatly.

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Classroom Environment: Strategies for First Year Elementary Teachers: Intro / Classroom Organization - YouTube

UT Arlington's Teacher Induction Project -- visit us at http://www.uta.edu/coehp/teacherinduction
Christopher Resetar's insight:

I first saw this video last year during my EDCI461 class and I really like it for two reasons.  First, the man in the video clearly defines classroom management and the categories that do into it such as small group management and the organization of the classroom.  I noted how closely the strategies in this video connected to the whole child principles that we learned in class.  When I child enters a classroom that is well organized, open, welcoming, and exciting it is a good incentive to prepares them to be ready to learn and meet the challenges that they will face that day.

 

I definitely think that there are strategies that I can take from this video and use them in my classroom.  More specially, the emphasis on group spaces and organization are crucial because it shows the children that the teacher is invested in learning and encourages them to be too.

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Authentic Education - Feedback: How Learning Occurs

Authentic Education - Feedback: How Learning Occurs | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Christopher Resetar's insight:

As I have mentioned several times in class, one of the aspects of PBL that I am most interested in is project based learning.  This article by Grant Wiggins which I have been exposed to many times in education I think is the best guide for how to give effective feedback. 

 

What I think is really effective about this article is that Wiggins differentiates between evaluations, praise, and feedback which are three distinctly different terms.  Feedback as Wiggins defines it, is neutral suggestions that accurately assess rather or not a student has achieved particular goals.  Using this definition I think that effective feedback is the most important part of fostering student success in PBL.

 

When I begin to teach next semester I with definitely try and use Wiggin's version of feedback in order to see if it helps my students be more successful.

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Finding Solutions to Hunger

Finding Solutions to Hunger | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
iEARN (International Education and Resource Network) is the world's largest non-profit global network that enables teachers and youth to use the Internet and other technologies to collaborate on projects that enhance learning and make a difference in the world.
Christopher Resetar's insight:

This is my favorite project that my group did for the PBL learning collection project.  It met the criteria that we discussed in EDCI397 as it was very relevant to developing global competency and developing skills that students will need to be successful in an increasing globalized world.

 

I particularly like this project because the students can see how decisions that they make have the potential to effect others around the world.  Students also have the opportunity to figure out how they can alter their decision making in order to have a positive change.

 

The only qualm I have with this project is that 10 weeks seems like an extremely long time to work on one topic.  I think that this project could be scaled back without changing the value of the lessons involved.

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3-5 Creativity & Innovation Rubric (CCSS Aligned) | Project Based Learning | BIE

3-5 Creativity & Innovation Rubric (CCSS Aligned) | Project Based Learning | BIE | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Christopher Resetar's insight:

Since we have been talking about PBL so much in class lately one of the things that I have been very curious about is how to score and evaluate them given that a large part of the project is based on student creativity.  On the website for the Buck Institute I found several rubrics that I think could be used in a classroom to effectively used to evaluate students.  What I really like about this rubric is that it is personalized so that students can score themselves before turning in or presenting a project,  I also like this rubric because it is very open ended and could apply to a variety of different projects that students might come up with,  I could definitely see myself using this in the classroom.

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5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know

5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know | EDCI397 | Scoop.it

"Most teachers and current textbooks offer varied approaches to the material to be learned so the teaching can be brain-compatible with the varied student learning styles. It is only logical that respect for these individual learning styles be incorporated into assessment forms."


Via Beth Dichter, Dennis T OConnor
Christopher Resetar's insight:

Like other comments on this scoop, I really like this article, especially items #1 and #2.  I really like those options because they are unconventional options that I still think would provide an appropriate level of challenge for the students as well as provide an alternative form of just a simple pencil and paper exam.  I think option #1 is more feasible for elementary school because it would allow students to work on skills that are more age appropriate like consolidation of information and looking for quality source material.

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Steve Vaitl's curator insight, February 13, 2014 9:13 AM

For my teaching friends. Go beyond memorization and help your students climb "Bloom's Ladder"!!

Ruby Day's curator insight, February 14, 2014 3:45 PM

Sounds like some great ideas to stimulate critical thinking

Audrey's curator insight, March 5, 2014 6:51 PM

All 5 assessment methods involves  students leading the learning. Asking the students questions based on their reading of the topic helps their analytical  skills and allows them to be in charge of their learning. 

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B. Norms: Rules and routines | Gaining Ground in Teaching - RESOURCES

Christopher Resetar's insight:

This is a site that I have been exposed to several times throughout my years at Maryland and has very helpful tabs that discuss almost any topic that needs to be covered.  To complete my classroom climate plan I decided that I should look into classroom routines and norms in order to determine what early routines that I can use when I start out teaching.

 

One of the things that I really like about this site is that it provides future teachers with quality tools to help develop the rules and routines that will maintain order and at the same time create an environment that is educational for students.  I also makes me more comfortable to know that norms and routines are something that many teachers struggle with early in the year and that it may take awhile before the students really begin to show that they understand the routines.  The tools also give very specific ideas and examples that can be tweaked to adapt to my own classroom.

 

Like many of the tools that we have acquired in Dr. Bote's class I think that I can definitely use the tools that I have found on this website to construct and implement many sold routines in my classroom.

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An Easy Guide to Setting Up Your Grade K-5 Classroom | Scholastic.com

An Easy Guide to Setting Up Your Grade K-5 Classroom | Scholastic.com | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
At last, a classroom of your own! Here's how to begin transforming that empty space into a warm and inviting place for your first class.
Christopher Resetar's insight:

This is an article from scholastic about how to arrange the desks in a classroom.  I really like the article because it talks about how to change different aspects of the room and what changing those aspects of the room does for you in the classroom.  I specifically like the classroom environment suggestion of this piece because it discusses how to create learning areas where students will want to explore and take on new challenges.

 

In class we have talked about at length about how crucial the physical aspects of the classroom space can have emotional effects on children as well.  In the examples in this article I know have a better understanding of how I can modify my space to better focus my students, give them a relaxed area to read or do just about anything else in my classroom.  As a future teacher I will make sure to save this link and use it when I feel like I need to modify my classroom (Which I hope is a lot)

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Classroom routines to promote success.

Classroom routines to promote success. | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Consistent classroom routines are vital for classroom management success.
Christopher Resetar's insight:

I ran across this article while engaging my personal learning network.  I really like this article because it discusses the pros and cons of routines yet also encourages teachers to allow student choice and input when creating classroom rules.  I really believe strongly in classrooms that are responsive to the needs of different students and in this way I feel that the article is addressing a feature of my classroom that will be very important.  

 

This article relates to the content that we have been discussing in EDCI397 because it allows the student to develop their whole self.  We often talk about how classrooms are based on whole child principles such as supporting and challenging each other.  If students are tasked with coming up with rules that work effectively for them they will assist in creating an environment that fosters their own learning development.

 

Lastly the tenants discussed in this article support the tenants of global competency.  The two tenants of global competency I specially think the concepts in this article address are responsibility and flexibility.  I think that by allowing student input into rules they feel like they are responsible for the success of other students.  They will also learn that sometimes the rules must change if the rules that are currently in place are not working.

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Components of a Classroom | eHow

Components of a Classroom | eHow | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
In K-12 education, every classroom is slightly different. For that matter, classrooms in secondary education can be different every hour, depending on the composition of students within a given setting. Consequently, components of a classroom are both tangible and intangible. The key to classroom success isn't necessarily in the components of a...
Christopher Resetar's insight:

This article is relatively straight forward but it explains different aspects of classroom climate very well.  One particular aspect of classroom climate that I saw in this article that I have not seen anywhere else was the focus on curriculum as a key component of classroom climate.  But when I thought about it at more length I realized just how important curriculum can be.to a classroom climate.  

In any classroom the direction of the class depends on how well the teacher adheres to the curriculum and how well students do at setting goals.  I think that if a teacher uses the correct strategies students will become more resilient and the classroom will be one in which the whole child can develop.  I think that this is a quick checklist that could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of any classroom.

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5 Easy Ways To Reduce Student Stress In The Classroom

5 Easy Ways To Reduce Student Stress In The Classroom | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
5 Easy Ways To Reduce Student Stress In The Classroom
Christopher Resetar's insight:

I thought that this article was directly related to what we talked about in class about classroom climate because it talks about several things students must have in the classroom in order to be successful.  One of the particular suggestions that this author made was allow room for fidgeting and movement,  I thought this was interesting because in most classrooms I have been in the expectation is that kids will be absolutely still and not move unless the teacher specifically tells them that they can.  But after reading this authors opinion I agree with his opinion that it is unrealistic to believe that kids will remain completely still.

 

While the second suggestion stood out to me the most,   The other factors that the author mentioned as being crucial to a classroom climate also hold true for me.  One other particular item that stood out to me was pay attention to transitions.  I agree with the author's point that having bad transition is the perfect time for kids to get off topic.  I think as a practicing teacher I will work to perfect my transitions and make sure that students do not have time to be bored.

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Students Eat More Fruits, Vegetables Under New Meal Standards, Study Finds

Students Eat More Fruits, Vegetables Under New Meal Standards, Study Finds | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
While food waste remains an issue, it did not increase after the schools in the study implemented new nutrition standards, the researchers found.
Christopher Resetar's insight:

One of our topics to focus on for this content curation is classroom climate.  Last semester in the Honors program we talked extensively about school lunch programs and how they can be crucial to a child's ability to have success in the classroom.  I think it is interesting that our many school lunch programs around the country have been emphasizing healthier options and it seems as though the kids are buying in too.

 

 I think that this article links directly to the whole child tenets that we discussed at length in class., especially healthy.  In my opinion, healthy children are successful children.  

 

This article also can be linked to global competence because food can be used to address several real world issues.  First, the article talks about how waste is still a major problem in schools and homes around the country.  I think you could make a unit in social studies, science, language arts and math by using waste as a guiding topic.  You might be able to do activities like have students discusses and collaborate on reducing food waste in the school cafeteria for example.  

 

When I first read this article, I was not expecting to get a project idea out of it.  However, this just shows that there are many ways in which you can help develop a student's global competency with almost any idea.

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Poverty Matters

Poverty Matters | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
It is all the rage among the pseudo-reformers to dismiss the importance of poverty. Although most of the pseudo-reformers grew up in affluence, attended elite private school, and send their own chi...
Christopher Resetar's insight:

In this blog post by Diane Ravitch she writes about how poverty has a major impact on children and their ability to succeed in school.  What I thought was interesting about this article (as well as the article she provides a link for) is that they both talk specifically about how poverty limits a child's resilience.  The specific qualities of resistance which the articles refer to are persistence, self-esteem and responsibility.  

 

I must admit I had always been a believer in the idea that kids who want to do well and have the drive to do well will always have success no matter their circumstances.  After reading these articles, I have definitely changed my mindset.  However, I would like to look more into specific practices that I can use to help kids from poor socio-economic backgrounds gain the skills that they need to succeed.

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Academic Content, Student Learning, and the Persistence of Preschool Effects

“Shoot for the Moon. Even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars”: this clichéd adage, often found on motivational posters, actually has something worthwhile to say. Sometimes where we set goals determines where we end up, even if the goal is seldom met.
Christopher Resetar's insight:

This article is from a twitter feed I follow by the Fordham Institute.  While they deal mostly in education policy they also occasionally publish short pieces and articles about classroom methodology.

 

This particular article is short article that talks about how teachers set goals for themselves and how the goals that they set can have a major impact on their craft.  I feel like this relates to teaching because I have seen some classroom teachers who are too quick to give up on a troublesome student or a class that is struggling to learn a concept.  I think that this article reminds teachers that we need to set our sights as high as we can and this will likely lead to better results, even if we don't necessarily meet all of our goals.

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Green Scene: Students Appreciate Sustainable, Eco-Friendly Building Design

Green Scene: Students Appreciate Sustainable, Eco-Friendly Building Design | EDCI397 | Scoop.it
Credit: SHW Group LLP

As you approach Roy Lee Walker Elementary School in McKinney, Texas, you quickly notice that something is different. Instead of the concrete-and-glass sameness that often
Christopher Resetar's insight:

"If you hear something, you retain 10 percent of the information. If you read something, you retain 20 percent. But if you experience something, you retain more than 70 percent of what you've learned."


This quote epitomizes one of the reasons why PBL is such a major emphasis in EDCI397,  In this particular article the school has invested in some environmentally friendly technology that not only explains to kids facts about conservation but shows them how.  Through many of these projects the teachers at this school are teaching the kids many aspects of global competency.  One of the ways they show it is by teaching kids about how decisions they make about things like recycling and saving water can affect other people. In addition, through the technology they invested in, the school is showing the kids some simple ways in which they can take action.


While some of the technologies in this article are expensive and might not be feasible for a school to purchase, I think that there are other cheaper ways in which we can encourage global competency.  Simple project like a water collection bottle or a project of the same sort could teach kids global competency.  I definitely think there are many other ways in which global competency can be stressed in the classroom and I will continue to seek out different ideas.

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Teaching with Twitter – Please check your baggage at the door

Teaching with Twitter – Please check your baggage at the door | EDCI397 | Scoop.it

How-to’s and link roundups on teaching with Twitter has been done many times before, but the topic is worth frequent revisiting and refreshing, especially in the context of the #FutureEd initiative and the Pedagogy Project by HASTAC Scholars.

 

The goal of this review is to help think through if, why, and how to use Twitter in our teaching and learning – especially for those who remain skeptical.

 


Via Gust MEES
Christopher Resetar's insight:

I really like this article because it is very effective at weighing the pros and cons of using twitter in the classroom.  Some of the supplemental links are also very helpful to look at and include content on how to teach with Twitter and how to avoid some of the pitfalls that can result from using Twitter in a classroom setting.   In general, I believe strongly in helping students to develop global competency (as we have discussed in class) and I believe that Twitter is one of the best and most convenient mediums to do this.  While I am slightly apprehensive about how and if it is even possible to use Twitter in an elementary school classroom I definitely see more potential in using it after reading this article. 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 15, 2014 12:00 PM


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Twitter


María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, February 15, 2014 1:37 PM

Very nice sharing. Thanks

objectplace's curator insight, February 16, 2014 11:40 PM

twitter why and why not discussion with deep links for more.

Good for higher ed

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The flip side of learning: New method lets teachers give students more attention - KansasCity.com

The flip side of learning: New method lets teachers give students more attention - KansasCity.com | EDCI397 | Scoop.it

I In Dennis Burkett’s “flipped” classroom at Olathe South High School, the lecture-style instruction is on video, often watched at home, which frees class time for problem-solving by working together, sharing ideas and team-solving. Just a few teachers are doing it in the school, but the sense is that the movement is growing.


Via Elizabeth E Charles
Christopher Resetar's insight:

I often hear about flipped classrooms in many of my education classes.  While this article is discussing the benefits of flipped classes in high school I think the same idea can be applied to elementary school classrooms.  One of the biggest benefits of this flipped classroom model that was not mentioned in the article is the ability for students to move at their own pace.  However, I would be somewhat concerned about my elementary school students being able to have the same time management and discipline skills that these students have in a high level high school class.  Overall, I think that the flipped classroom model is one that I can use with an appropriate class.

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