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Taking Notes by Hand Benefits Recall, Researchers Find – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Taking Notes by Hand Benefits Recall, Researchers Find – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | EDCI280 | Scoop.it

Via iPamba, Les Howard
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paper vs. tech

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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Non-Traditional Schooling
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What you might not understand about Unschooling – | Petra School

What you might not understand about Unschooling – | Petra School | EDCI280 | Scoop.it

"Pebblekeeper" has a cool perspective on unschooling and how it differs from "school at home." I like what she says about not being a slave to the tools - I know that I was often a slave to the curriculum I was using and missed opportunities to make learning fun instead of only an objective to be met. While it is probably true that there are unschoolers who are so undisciplined that they probably shouldn't even say that any kind of "schooling" is going on, I think a lot of people just don't understand how unschooling works and wrongly paint all unschoolers as lazy do-nothings when that just is not true.


Via Susan Critelli, Sarah Molina
Sarah Molina's insight:

 I scooped an article about Un-schooling after our class discussed nontraditional schooling types. I wanted to learn more about the concept because I had never heard of it before until EDCI280. The article really helped me to better understand this concept. At first, it seemed weird. The author states "Our day is full of schedules, topics, ideas activities. It will just never ever look like “school”. When we need to learn something – we will use a tool. We will not be a slave to that tool – or obedient to the letter – and we may use the tool outside it’s intended use." This type of learning seems efficient and sounds like it would be successful for a certain type of student.

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50 Awesome Ways to Use Skype in the Classroom - 2014's Top Teaching Degrees: Compare Programs by Cost, Location, Size

Skype is a free and easy way for teachers to open up their classroom and their students to a world way beyond their campus
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from NextEd
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StraightAce Self-Tutoring App Aims To Help Middle School Math Students -- THE Journal

StraightAce Self-Tutoring App Aims To Help Middle School Math Students -- THE Journal | EDCI280 | Scoop.it

Benesse America has unveiled a self-tutoring mobile app that uses gamification to help struggling middle school students improve in math. StraightAce, which is available now, is compatible with iOS and Android smartphones and tablets.

 

For each Common Core-aligned lesson, StraightAce, appropriate for students in grade 6-8, provides 10 questions, 10 optional hints, and explanations for each correct answer. The app provides students with gold stars when they choose right answers, which can be exchanged for in-game rewards such as coins and avatars.


Via Jim Britton
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Go Go Learning
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StraightAce Self-Tutoring App Aims To Help Middle School Math Students -- THE Journal

StraightAce Self-Tutoring App Aims To Help Middle School Math Students -- THE Journal | EDCI280 | Scoop.it

Benesse America has unveiled a self-tutoring mobile app that uses gamification to help struggling middle school students improve in math.


Via Dr. Joan McGettigan
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Classroom environment
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Create the Environment | Connected Principals

Create the Environment | Connected Principals | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
I realized that my role is not to be “the innovative one”, but in actuality, it is to help create the best environments for our school division to allow the brilliance of others to create the innovation. This needs to be an environment and culture that is created for every person from student to superintendent. The more we tap into each other, the better we all are.

 

I used to think that we needed to make a shift in our classrooms from “teacher focused” to “student focused”. But through my work, and then seeing the photo below, that statement wasn’t quite right. The best environments are learner focused. It is an “all in” idea that learning is something we do with our students, not to them.

 

By George Couros http://connectedprincipals.com/archives/5861


Via David Truss, Julie Golden
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
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5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know

5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know

 

Most teachers and current textbooks offer varied approaches to the material to be learned so the teaching can be brain-compatible with the varied student learning styles. It is only logical that respect for these individual learning styles be incorporated into assessment forms.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, February 11, 6:48 PM

These teaching and learning assessment strategies can be adapted to fit within your learning environment.

Juan Legarda's curator insight, February 12, 6:22 PM

Learning Styles and Assessment:

Kirsten Macaulay's curator insight, February 13, 5:28 AM

Option 1: Open-Book & Take-Home Tests

 

Option 2: Student-Made Tests

 

How My Students Create And Study For Their Own Exams

This is the process I use for student-created math final exams in my classroom. Your process may differ depending on grade level, content area, or other local concerns.

I give the structure for the tests students are required to create such as, “Include 15 calculations and 5 word problems with 2 from each of the 10 subsections of the chapter”I make a copy of each test and change the numbers, but not the structure of the equations. They knew I would do this and that the numbers will be different than the ones they usedStudents are assigned homework to make practice tests on their own, using the template of the test they created and changing the numbers themselvesIn class, for further review, students exchange their practice tests with partners for study and to the confirm accuracy of their answers (as I don’t have an answer key to all of their self-created tests)

Option 3: The Complexity & Diversity Of Project-Based Learning

Option 4: Written Response–Or Rather, The Pre-Writing

Option 5: Ask A Question


Great article.

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Diversity Council: Middle School Diversity Activities

Diversity Council: Middle School Diversity Activities | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Common Core Online
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How Common Core standards are affecting elementary, middle school math classes

How Common Core standards are affecting elementary, middle school math classes | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
How Common Core standards are affecting elementary, middle school math ...

Via Darren Burris
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Activities for the Middle School Classroom
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Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking

Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
  via Edutopia Ideally, teaching kids how to think critically becomes an integral part of your approach, no matter what subject you teach. But if you're just getting started, here are some con...

Via Carrie Nethery
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Dual-language classrooms at work in three Worcester schools - Worcester Telegram

Dual-language classrooms at work in three Worcester schools - Worcester Telegram | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
Dual-language classrooms at work in three Worcester schools
Worcester Telegram
Chandler Magnet, across from Worcester State University, is one of three Worcester public elementary schools that offer dual-language classrooms.

Via Dr. Kathleen Contreras
Sarah Molina's insight:

important when you have students who grew up speaking a different language than English. ELLs

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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from 21st Century Literacy and Learning
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Taking Notes by Hand Benefits Recall, Researchers Find – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Taking Notes by Hand Benefits Recall, Researchers Find – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | EDCI280 | Scoop.it

Via iPamba, Les Howard
Sarah Molina's insight:

paper vs. tech

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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Common Core Online
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It's About Time: What It Takes to Implement Common Core and Improve Learning

It's About Time: What It Takes to Implement Common Core and Improve Learning | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
It's About Time: What It Takes to Implement Common Core and Improve LearningThe Common Core State Standards have elicited both enthusiastic praise and blistering criticism. What does it take to do Common Core right?
Via Darren Burris
Sarah Molina's insight:

Core is important but it's hard to do it right so that the students get more out of it. 

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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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What’s Your Learning Disposition?How to Foster Students’ Growth, Success,&Value MindsetsTY! @Kschwart

What’s Your Learning Disposition?How to Foster Students’ Growth, Success,&Value  MindsetsTY! @Kschwart | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck’s work on growth mindsets has dominated much of the attention around how students can influence their own learning. But there are other ways to help students tap into their own motivation, too. Here are a few other important mindsets to consider.

By Katrina Schwartz 


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 26, 9:14 AM

A practical look at shifting school focus from a focus on grades to discussions of how students manage set-backs, find connections, and sustain efforts. Thank you, Katrina Schwartz!--Lou

Excerpt:


"Here are a few other important mindsets to consider.

Belonging to an academic community: Feeling connected to adults and peers at school intellectually, not just socially, through an academic community, is a strong motivator. Feeling a sense of belonging in an intellectual community helps students interpret setbacks as a natural part of learning, and not as a personal deficit that sets them apart.

Belief in the likelihood of success: Students’ belief in their own self-efficacy is a better predictor of academic success than measured ability. Students need to feel that they’re likely to succeed in order to sustain the hard work of learning something challenging. When students believe they’ll fail, they often don’t invest in the work or devalue the task.

The work has meaning and value: The brain naturally looks for connections. When students find academic work to be relevant to lives, interests, and concerns they’re much more likely to work on a task in a sustained way and to perform well. It takes much more energy to focus attention on a task that does not have direct value to the student.

Belief that abilities and intelligence can grow with effort: Known as a growth mindset, Carol Dweck’s theory we refer to above) if students believe the brain is a muscle that must be exercised, they’re more likely to interpret setbacks as opportunities to learn and improve. This mindset is associated with the joy of mastering a task, rather than learning for a grade or to outperform others."

 

Growth, community, a sense of personal agency, and creating meaningful work are not always the primary goals in many U.S. schools. Too often the conversation is focused on test scores, standards and pacing guides. Educators and researchers working to develop academic mindsets emphasized the importance of school culture to make kids believe in the concepts. “Adults in the building have to be very clear that you can’t have a focus on academic mindsets if all you’re going to be focused on is grades,” said Mahoney.

Fostering academic mindsets is a two-way street and requires teachers to listen to students. “If we’re thinking about what’s required of us as teachers to foster academic mindsets in classrooms — and thereby foster student development and growth — it’s a mindset in and of itself,” said Rob Riordan, co-founder of High Tech High and President of its Graduate School of Education. “It wants to know what students are thinking and how they’re thinking.”

Growth, community, a sense of personal agency, and creating meaningful work are not always the primary goals in many U.S. schools. Too often the conversation is focused on test scores, standards and pacing guides. Educators and researchers working to develop academic mindsets emphasized the importance of school culture to make kids believe in the concepts. “Adults in the building have to be very clear that you can’t have a focus on academic mindsets if all you’re going to be focused on is grades,” said Mahoney.

Fostering academic mindsets is a two-way street and requires teachers to listen to students. “If we’re thinking about what’s required of us as teachers to foster academic mindsets in classrooms — and thereby foster student development and growth — it’s a mindset in and of itself,” said Rob Riordan, co-founder of High Tech High and President of its Graduate School of Education. “It wants to know what students are thinking and how they’re thinking.”

---Katrina Schwartz 

Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Non-Traditional Schooling
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School is a prison — and damaging our kids

School is a prison — and damaging our kids | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
Longer school years aren't the answer. The problem is school itself. Compulsory teach-and-test simply doesn't work
Sarah Molina's insight:

My scoop that is titled "School is a prison," has a lot of interesting topics that we have touched in class. In discussion circles my table has talked about traditional schooling compared to nontraditional, and how we feel about them. This article talked about school restricting freedom. The author states that the "natural drives and abilities of young people to learn are fully sufficient to motivate their entire education." I do agree with this but I also believe that school is not a prison. I want to learn ways in which I can make my classroom inviting and successful in driving the abilities of my students to achieve and learn to their best ability.

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Rachael Grant's curator insight, April 22, 1:06 PM

Traditional schools a prison? That sounds a little harsh to me, but it is true that schools today are still based off of history and tradition rather than new research. We try to incorporate new technology and techniques into our classrooms, but should we consider transforming the entire structure of the school day/year altogether? How could this help to benefit children with ADHD and other learning disabilities?

Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Skype in classroom
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Skype in the Classroom

Using Skype including Mystery Skype

Via L. García Aretio, Alejandro González
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Literacy and the Common Core Standards
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Website to help middle-school readers build skills

Website to help middle-school readers build skills | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
Reading is key to learning and the demands for literacy rise with each grade to increase the challenges faced by struggling middle-school readers and students with learning disabilities, writes Ted Hasselbring, research professor at Peabody College...

Via Frances
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from The Middle Road
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English Updates: Reading Intervention for Struggling Middle School ...

Question: What can teachers in the middle school do to help improve struggling readers' achievement in reading? Quote: “The first thing one has to realize about intervention and children in the middle grades is that there is ...

Via Kaye Henrickson
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Middle Level Leadership
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Making Transitions Effective To and From the Middle Level

Making Transitions Effective To and From the Middle Level | EDCI280 | Scoop.it

Join AMLE and Patti Kinney as we take a look at how to make transitions to and from the middle grades smooth and seamless.


Via Patti Kinney
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from 21st Century Teaching and Technology Resources
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Best Websites for Teaching & Learning 2013 | American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

Best Websites for Teaching & Learning 2013 | American Association of School Librarians (AASL) | EDCI280 | Scoop.it

The 2013 Best Websites for Teaching and Learning foster the qualities of innovation, creativity, active participation, and collaboration. They are free, Web-based sites that are user friendly and encourage a community of learners to explore and discover.

Media Sharing

Digital Storytelling

Manage & Organize

Social Networking & Communication

Content Resources

Curriculum Collaboration


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, February 22, 1:22 AM

These are excellent resources to add to your 21st century teaching and learning environments.

Rescooped by Sarah Molina from AQ Resources
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Teaching Math to Middle School Boys

Teaching Math to Middle School Boys | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
Teaching Math to Middle School Boys

Via Carrie Nethery
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Naomi W's curator insight, March 5, 10:53 PM

Using the differences between boys and girls to make the curriculum better. 

 

Questions for students:

 

1. Do you think that there are differences between boys and girls and how they learn? Can you give at least ONE example based on your own experiences in school?

 

2. Do you think there are differences between female and male TEACHERS and how they teach? Can you give at least ONE example based on your own experiences in school?

 

3. In regards to maths, do you think boys and girls learn differently? Should there be boys maths and girls maths? Please state your reasons. 

Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Activities for the Middle School Classroom
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The Tremendous Travels of Trash

The Tremendous Travels of Trash | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
Students watch demonstrations and a video in order to understand where water goes when it goes down a drain and how water pollutants impact a much larger area.

Via Carrie Nethery
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Activities for the Middle School Classroom
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Back to School Science That Sticks | Experiments | Steve Spangler Science

Back to School Science That Sticks | Experiments | Steve Spangler Science | EDCI280 | Scoop.it

Via Carrie Nethery
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Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Learning & Mind & Brain
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8 Types of Learning Events You Need to Have in Your Classroom

8 Types of Learning Events You Need to Have in Your Classroom | EDCI280 | Scoop.it

A good eLearning course requires the right combination of learning events. But what are these exactly? A learning event is a simplified description of the student's learning activity. There's an infinite number of learning strategies, but only eight learning events. It isn’t necessary to use all the events in the creation of your course. Just get acquainted with each of them to make sure you use the right combination to make your course effective.

 

LeClercq and Poumay's (2005) Eight Learning Events Model propose a ‘palette’ of 8 specific ways, referred to as Learning Events, that the eLearning designer can use to describe any point in the development of learning activities.

 

 


Via Beth Dichter, Miloš Bajčetić
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WEAC's curator insight, April 3, 3:29 PM

One of the best: 4. Exploration: It's the learner who has the initiative and takes control.

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 14, 11:52 AM

Me gusta el concepto de "Evento de Aprendizaje". puede que con él, si es suficientemente amplio, se pueda resolver el batiburrillo de métodos, técnicas, estrategias, procedimientos, protocolos, tácticas, etcétera, con la que nuestros profes se enredan más y más.

Betty Skeet's curator insight, June 15, 8:00 AM

Learning events you need in your class.

Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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7 Things To Remember About Classroom Feedback - Edudemic

7 Things To Remember About Classroom Feedback - Edudemic | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
Feedback is an inevitable part of teaching. Naturally, you’re in a position where you’re giving a whole lot of feedback, but you’re likely on the receiving end of feedback as well. We’ve all been on the receiving end of feedback in various aspects of our lives, and I’m sure we’ve all experienced some feedback that …

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 3, 3:45 PM

Very useful reminders about giving and getting feedback! The most important to me  #s 4 & 5.  The most important feedback we can give is timed to be useful to steering students towards the learning goal. Grades are feedback but often come too late in the process to influence learning in a positive way. This goes for low and high marks! --Lou

 

Excerpt:

7 Things To Remember About Classroom FeedbackFeedback is not advice, praise or evaluation. Feedback is information about how we are doing in our efforts to reach a goal.If students know the classroom is a safe place to make mistakes, they are more likely to use feedback for learning.The feedback students give teachers can be more powerful than the feedback teachers give students.When we give a grade as a part of feedback, students often don’t see past the grade.Effective feedback occurs during the learning, when there is still time to act on it.Most of the feedback that students receive about their classroom work is from other students – and most of that feedback is wrong.Students need to know their learning target – the specific skill they’re supposed to learn – or else feedback is just someone telling them what to do.
Rescooped by Sarah Molina from Professional Development and Teaching Ideas for English Language Teachers
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4 Tips to Build Student Confidence

4 Tips to Build Student Confidence | EDCI280 | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Matt Levinson, recognizing that students get overwhelmed by unfamiliar material and choke up on assessments, offers four confidence-building strategies: verbalizing, brain dumps, non-linear thinking creativity.

Via Dean J. Fusto, Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat
Sarah Molina's insight:

very important

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