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27 Classroom Management Strategies To Keep Things Fresh

27 Classroom Management Strategies To Keep Things Fresh | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
27 Classroom Management Strategies To Keep Things Fresh

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Create a successful classroom climate.

Create a successful classroom climate. | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
Creating a positive classroom climate and a supportive environment will help your students become successful learners.

Via Elisa A.
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Elisa A.'s curator insight, March 11, 2014 9:22 AM

The classroom climate is an important aspect in creating a supportive environment where students will thrive.  This article provides some strategies that teachers can implement in their classroom to create a climate where students feel safe, motivated and eager to succeed.  As a future teacher, it is important to be prepared with the right tools that will allow me to implement a classroom with a positive climate.  This article is providing me with ideas I can use in my class.  Reading about strategies is easy, but the difficult part of it is to successfully implement them.  It would some time to see the results, but at the end everyone would benefit form those strategies.

Kaitlin Roach's curator insight, March 13, 2014 11:28 PM

This article discuses the importance of creating an environment that is engaging for students to learn in, and ways a teacher can create a positive classroom climate.

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Better Living: Open Circle- Social and Emotional Learning

Students in Boston Public Schools are taking part in Open Circle, which empowers them to promote positive behaviors and healthy relationships at school and i...

Via Hallie Lease
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The Differences Between Projects And Project-Based Learning - Edudemic

The Differences Between Projects And Project-Based Learning - Edudemic | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
There's a big difference between using projects in the classroom versus project-based learning in the classroom. What are those differences, you ask?

Via Nicole Liebler
Sophia Vitilio's insight:

 I personally really like this article because it helps to distinct projects from project based learning, which I think can be very important for someone who does not know much about it or is just learning about it.   This really shows the differences between how a project is just something that is done for a grade and does not have as much relevance where as a project based learning project has relevance and is stimulating.  I really hope that the more I learn about project based learning, the more I will be able to incorporate it into my future classroom because this article proves to me how important it truly is.

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Nicole Liebler's curator insight, February 19, 2014 12:06 AM

I found this source to be particularly helpful in distinguishing the features of projects from project-based learning, since the difference confuses me sometimes. Some of the most helpful points I took away from this source are that PBL includes collaboration, continued inquiry, a general need/interest to know, relevance to students' lives, a focus on the PROCESS of learning, real world applications, and presentation of the discoveries. While projects can include some of these aspects as well, I think the main idea of this chart is to emphasize that PBL is more focused on student-driven inquiry about driving questions. After reading this chart, I have started to consider how to implement more PBL-like experiences into my classroom, as opposed to projects. I think it is important for me to learn more about how to assess students during their process of learning, as opposed to emphasizing their "products" because PBL focuses on the fact that students are learning AS they are doing it.

Hallie Lease's curator insight, February 19, 2014 1:48 PM

All throughout my public schooling we did "projects" just like the ones described in this article. And I remember feeling like the projects were just busywork, and that they didn't really relate to me. I remember questioning why we were even learning about some of the things we did. This article really describes the big differences between projects and project based learning. PBLs mean so much more to students, and the teachers. A teacher who does PBLs should have confidence in the fact that his/her students are much more likely to remember the information being taught, and use what they learn in other ways and times of their lives. 

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Project-Based Learning in Math: 6 Examples

Project-Based Learning in Math: 6 Examples | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
Project-Based Learning in Math: 6 Examples

Via Dr Peter Carey
Sophia Vitilio's insight:

Before reading this article I thought the easiest ways to introduce project based learning into the classroom was with social studies or science but this article has really opened me up to see how math can very easily be project based.  This article also gives six useful examples that one could bring back to their classroom to try.  I hope to do my best to incorporate project based learning into all of my classes when I teach, but this really gives some good insight of how to do so with geometry!

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Jessica Guercio's curator insight, February 19, 2014 10:34 PM

One subject I personally find it more difficult to discover project-based learning tasks for is math. This article provides a few different examples of projects you could incorporate into your math curriculum!

Kaitlin Roach's curator insight, February 20, 2014 3:45 PM

Different ways to incorporate PBL with geometry. Fun real life examples that can make math meaningful. 

Imon's comment, February 20, 2014 11:09 PM
I am an elementary education major with a specialization in math. So this article was especially interesting to me. Also when I was younger geometry was the hardest for me to understand. I can remember countless nights staying up studying with my father trying to not only memorize formulas but understand the meaning behind them. This article was helpful and gave me ideas for activities that I would use in my classroom. When I was in grade school I don't remember doing a lot of the activities that are now offered through project based learning. And these activities even helped me have a better understanding of concepts. I think that it is good that these activities are offered now. I think this will help improve the efficiency of learning for students.
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Critical Assessment Ideas from PBL World

Critical Assessment Ideas from PBL World | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
I had a great time at the PBL World Conference in so many ways: as a presenter, as a panelist, as a listener, as a collaborator, and even as the subject of art. (Now, that is something I would never,

Via Edutopia
Sophia Vitilio's insight:

I can easily say that although I am currently enrolled in an assessment class, I never thought of the challenges in assessment with project based learning.  Since our world is becoming more technology based as time goes on, I really thing that teaching and assessing 21st century skills are very important.  If we want our students to be globally competent, they will need these skills, and will need to keep up with them to be successful in a global world.  I think it is always important for goals to be set.  This being said, I think it would be effective for students to set goals as they work on their PBL work so they can revise appropriately so their final product is up to par.  I also believe that it is beyond important for whatever a student is doing to be meaningful to them.  Personally, I put more effort and have more passion for what I am working on when I have an interest for it so I would want my students to do work that is meaningful to them.  A personal drive will allow for a thriving classroom.  One other part of PBL I see as challenging is how to use this type of learning while still having to prepare students for standardized tests.

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Melissa Dittman Solazzo's curator insight, February 11, 2014 3:03 PM

As we move into "Messy Education" we need to keep this in mind. . .

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20 Tips To Promote A Self-Directed Classroom Culture

20 Tips To Promote A Self-Directed Classroom Culture | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it
20 Tips To Promote A Self-Directed Classroom Culture

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Sophia Vitilio's insight:

I personally really liked these tips and will definitely be using some of them in my future classroom.  I actually really thought it was different and liked that one of the tips was to make it a safe place to fail.  This is because I feel like everything about school is always about getting good grades and students feel ashamed to get a bad grade, especially a failing grade. This makes it very important to create an environment where it is okay to fail.

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JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:25 PM

TeachThought provides a list of 20 tips to promote a self-directed classroom culture.  They say a great classroom culture needs to be a place in which:

Safe Place to FailEncourage CuriosityGive your students a voiceUse tiered responsibilityFoster peer supportConsider natural consequencesConfidence buildingModel how to learnDon’t impose limitations

10. Use real life examples of perseverance

11. Teach students how to set manageable goals

12. Teach students how to overcome disappointment

13. Reward attitude, not just aptitude

14. Believe in their abilities

15. Accept the mess

16. Offer reflection after the project is over

17. Give immediate feedback

18. Give both short and long-term assignments

19. Identify obstacles and negative beliefs

20. Let go of the idea that students success reflects on you

 

To me, the only way to establish classroom culture is for it to be self-directed.  Culture is something that is hard to put your finger on because it really is intangible, it is something that has to be taught, transferred, and supported by everyone in the room.  These suggestions are great guidelines for how to think about student success and believing good things for your class.  Some practical suggestions I would like to use for sure, are peer support and giving students a voice.  I believe kids are more inclined to become passionate learners when they feel like they have a voice in what goes on in the classroom.

Lauren Yachera's curator insight, March 7, 2014 1:12 PM

Really insightful tips that help to promote a self-directed classroom culture. I came across a few that I never really considered before: making the classroom a safe place to fail, and considering natural consequences. Both of these go together hand-in-hand when it comes to students attitudes towards not doing as well as they may have expected. Students need to know that it is okay to fail (sometimes, not all of the time!) and that they can bounce back from it. They cannot be afraid of failure; if they are, they may never try new things. It's important to build a nurturing and supportive classroom, where the teacher acts as a neutral supporter (rather than an angry, disappointed one) that encourages the student that everything will be okay. We have to help them if they don't do well, not hurt them even more.

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Creating a Cozy Classroom - On a Budget

Creating a Cozy Classroom - On a Budget | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it

"What’s Here The purpose of decorating a classroom is to create a functional space for learning. However, there are tips and tricks for arranging your space in a way that creates a comfortable, relaxed, and attractive environment. "


Via Jenna Michel
Sophia Vitilio's insight:

Being a future teacher, I know how much the job pays and also that a teacher has to pay a lot out of pocket for her classroom and materials.  I found this super helpful for creating a cozy classroom climate on a budget!

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Jenna Michel's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:30 AM

Using limited resources to create a comfortable and inviting classroom that is also changable for the purposes of PBL. As first year teachers I think this is a good resources of tips for creating that ideal classroom.

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Create a successful classroom climate

Create a successful classroom climate | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it

How to create a classroom climate that will help your students become successful learners.


Via Cheryl Irish
Sophia Vitilio's insight:

Creating a certain climate for the classroom is very important to show that learning is and will be highly valued.  By having quality relationships, a smooth running classroom, and having personal development for students as keys, these can help to create positive classroom climates.  This is a climate I would want to have in my classroom because I believe that it is best for students to learn in a positive environment.

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Lauren Jackson's curator insight, March 10, 2014 1:20 PM

I re-scooped this article from Sydney's page. I'm sure all of us have experienced classroom environments that are negative, positive, and in between. When I think of a comfortable classroom environment I automatically think about positive teacher student relationships. I didn't realize that student student relationships are equally as important. It is not about the quantity, but the quality of relationships within your classroom.The relationships must be genuine and important to students to further interactive learning. As a young teacher, it is critical that I am consistent in my methods. Students need warm, approachable teachers to ask questions. Even when I am feeling overwhelmed, I will not let my emotions control my interaction with students, for it can have a negative impact on the classroom climate.

Hallie Lease's curator insight, March 12, 2014 1:48 PM

Teachers are responsible for creating a comfortable learning environment for children. These tips and strategies are perfect guide for teachers to show how to create the right environment for students, and what students need to learn in the best way. 

jessica slater's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:09 PM

Creating a successful classroom climate has many educational benefits. Most importantly, in a successful classroom, students are able to enhance learning. In my classroom, I would like to create a "warm" environment by being approachable and supportive. I would also consider changing the physical space into a more "warm" atmosphere. Having a "warm" environment enhances the quality of learning within the classroom. In addition to creating a "warm" environment, being enthusiastic and having high expectations for my students also contribute to creating a successful classroom climate in the classroom. These factors will help me create a positive classroom climate so that I can maximize the potential of my students.

Rescooped by Sophia Vitilio from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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5 Useful Free Web Tools for Project Based Learning assignments

The Web provides many tools that can play a fun and helpful role in Project Based Learning Project based learning is one of many active learning methods,

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Sophia Vitilio's insight:

 This article gives some free websites that students can use for project based learning assignments.  They all make projects easier for students to put together and to get to from different computers.  In a way this makes me think of my personal learning network with the free ways to share ideas through the internet.  These resources all seem very useful for a project based learning classroom and I cannot wait to see how they will grow and expand by the time I have my own classroom.

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Bella Rose Montero's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:27 AM

Ways by which to enrich PBS outputs

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The Global Teacher

The Global Teacher | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it

I have talked about the notion of "classroom teacher" vs. "school teacher" in posts before, and have begun to rethink this notion. …. 

 

So now I have started to think about the “global teacher“.  The global teacher has the best elements of the classroom and school teacher, but their focus is on “what is best for kids”, no matter if is their own kids, kids in the school across the street, or across the ocean.  They got into teaching because they love students and want to help every single one of them, no matter their situation or location.  They care for the kids in their classroom, they share openly with others in their school and connect with kids, but want to make things better past their own situation.  They inspire change whether it is with one classroom in another school, or thousands.  They also tap into others and bring the best to their students. The more we look at what others are doing, the better we can become for the students closest to us.


Via iEARN-USA
Sophia Vitilio's insight:

 Just based from the title of this article, I have to say that if a goal of ours is to inspire globally competent students, then we as teachers have to also be global.  Based from this article, it tells that not only the students should be contributing, but teachers should also be contributing and making a difference for others.  I believe for this to be very important and hope that if teachers want their students to be globally competent, that they too take a step in the same direction.

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Lauren Yachera's curator insight, February 16, 2014 5:42 PM

Really interesting to see how teachers can really be divided up into groups based off of how involved they are with their students, their school, and the world. As the world keeps changing, it becomes more and more important for a teacher to keep in touch with what is going on not only in their student's lives, but in the world as well. Globally competent teachers are needed in order to keep up with the world.

Hallie Lease's curator insight, February 16, 2014 6:29 PM

This article really describes the characteristics of a true global teacher :) It is wanting the best for all students, no matter who they are or where they are. Teachers that instill resistance in children, so they can in turn make a change or difference in the world on there own, no matter how small. 

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When Students Do The Teaching

When Students Do The Teaching | EDCI 397 | Scoop.it

Guest blogger Kiera Chase shares the power of students creating lessons and teaching their peers.


Via Edutopia
Sophia Vitilio's insight:

I personally thought this was very interesting for several reasons.  One reason being that the students were doing the teaching.  Growing up, I was always helping others, helping 'teach' them things that they did not understand, and this ended up giving me an even more understanding then what I already had.  I think it is really good for students to do the teaching because it really gets them involved and interested in what they have to learn.  

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Rachel McGrath's comment, February 19, 2014 11:22 PM
I completely agree. I know that a lot of times the things I can remember the most are those that I taught to someone else who was struggling. In fact if I really wanted to make sure I knew the concepts and would remember it for the test, I PURPOSELY taught it. I have seen a bunch of times where someone understands what the answer is but can't explain it. I feel like practicing that "teaching" aspect of any subject is important. It not only lets you learn to communicate with others well, but it also like you stated gets them involved and interested. Teaching the material is a good way for them to engage and I enjoyed it when teachers I had would have us do this for a topic in class.