EDCI 280
37 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Recommended Web links

Recommended Web links | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
I have put together a list of web links that I have found to be interesting and informative.
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

As we become more technologically advanced, especially in classrooms, I thought these websites could be helpful for any teacher in the classroom. There are many resources out there that can benefit students in several ways, and also help the teachers become more open and available for students and their parents. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Social Consciousness: This Is What Happens When A Kid Leaves Traditional Education

Logan Laplante is a 13 year-old boy who was taken out of the education system to be home schooled instead. Not only was he home schooled, but Logan had the ability to tailor his education to his interests and also his style of learning, something traditional education does not offer. As Logan has mentioned, when he grows up he wants to be happy and healthy.
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

This TED talk was done by a 13 year old boy and it really opens your eyes to non-traditional learning. As a teenager he explains that he enjoys homeschooling, and the opportunities he has since he is not in a typical classroom. He creates his own term called hack schooling, where he is "hacking" the idea of education and making it the way he wants it to be. He uses philosophies of other educators and spends time learning about the things that he thinks are necessary and that the traditional education system lacks. I was really surprised to see such a young person have such wisdom and deep thoughts, and to be able express his success story with others is amazing. I agreed with a lot of what Logan said, and think that some of his philosophy should be integrated into schools. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Homeschooling: Reasons and Misconceptions | Evolutionary Parenting | Where History And Science Meet Parenting

Homeschooling: Reasons and Misconceptions | Evolutionary Parenting | Where History And Science Meet Parenting | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
Homeschooling is something that gets mixed reviews when I bring up that we plan on it for our daughter. Whereas most people we know are actually quite
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

I found this article on twitter using the #homeschool. I think it really covers what we find stereotypical about the choice to homeschool and why it isn't always true, and the real reasons why some parents choose to homeschool. I was interested to see what they had to say and it makes sense to why they chose homeschooling for their daughter. I have tweeted the person who originally posted the link to the article to see their opinion about homeschooling, and try to find out how these stereotypes of homeschool kids got started. I am interested to find out more about these alternate types of schooling, and I want to know what opportunities teachers can have in homeschooling, if that's possible. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Classroom Organization Tips from Veteran Teachers - TeacherVision.com

Classroom Organization Tips from Veteran Teachers - TeacherVision.com | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
Use these tips from experienced teachers to get your classroom organized and keep it that way for the whole year.
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

Classroom organization has been a new focus in our class. These tips  are simple things that any teacher can use and many little things that someone may not think of. I would've liked to see them write more about their experiences and the pros and cons of each. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

A photo from @DrEscotet

A photo from @DrEscotet | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

Using the #education on twitter, I found Dr. Escotet's tweet with a political cartoon attached. He shares that it describes exactly how he feels about standardized testing. Though it's a silly cartoon, it really does show how unfair standardized testing is. Each student has different abilities and learns in a different way. Yet, teachers are so afraid of their students failing, that they don't take the time to learn each student's needs in order to succeed in the academic world. Some students will always do well on testing, where others may always have difficulties due to several variables. The idea that standardized testing is supposed to be "fair" is far from true, and I personally agree with Dr. Escotet, and believe that something should change. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Five Tips for Getting the ESL Student Talking

Five Tips for Getting the ESL Student Talking | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
I wanted to talk to someone. But who? It's moments like this, when you need someone the most, that your world seems smallest. -- Rachel Cohn, Dash & Lily's Book of Dares

Let's face it -- everyone ha
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

Learning about ELL/ESOL/ESL students is one of my new priorities. It was never something I've experienced prior to my time in the classroom that I am observing currently. I found it hard to relate to them at first, and a part of me felt like they felt uncomfortable around me. In my opinion, these five tips are very helpful for any educator, and help you understand what the student is going through. This opened my eyes to the idea of looking at individual needs of each student, and that clumping them together to assume they are having the same problem because they are all ELL students is wrong. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Typing vs. Cursive in Elementary Schools

Typing vs. Cursive in Elementary Schools | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
Cursive writing vs. printing until recently was debated by teachers in elementary schools. Recently, however, with the wide adoption of new educational standards that will measure student achievement ...
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

This concept of dropping cursive out of the curriculum and creating a stronger focus on typing was very interesting to me. As our world becomes more technology-savy, would it be more beneficial to forget about cursive and make keyboarding skills the new second "handwriting" skill. More tests are completed on the computer, and the need for cursive is rare, so the article questions whether this is the right move. 

 

Personally, I will always have a love for cursive, and it is something that I will want to incorporate into my classroom. Interning in a second grade classroom, I know how anxious the students are to learn cursive, and often try to attempt it before taught. Though typing will probably end up being more beneficial, I would like to be able to include both things because they are both good skills to have. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Down With Homework! | Scholastic.com

Down With Homework! | Scholastic.com | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
Author of The Homework Myth, Alfie Kohn argues that homework may not be good for kids after all. Kohn explains the value of after school time for play. He also talks about a new approach to homework.
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

Scholastic did a piece on no homework policies, which I found intriguing because they make homework and school materials for children, at least when I was in school. They summarize what Alfie Kohn's new book, "The Homework Myth" is about. They break down how homework is an overload and how it isn't beneficial for children until the high school age. It also confronts the myth about the nonacademic benefits of homework- self-discipline, independence, perseverance, etc.. 

 

I enjoyed this piece, because as stated before, I do not agree with homework for younger children. Studying time has increased by a lot in the last 20-30 years, and children have no time to relax or play after school, which is essential to healthy development. I find these aspects important, and I would like to be able to apply this in my own classroom if possible. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Using Twitter to #GuessMyNumber

Using Twitter to #GuessMyNumber | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
Using Twitter to #GuessMyNumber
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

I thought this concept was really interesting. We've been using Twitter in our class, and in another education class of mine, we used Skype. This was really cool to see elementary school students using technology like this to improve math skills, and be able to communicate with others internationally. I had never heard of the Guess My Number hashtag or the Mystery Number Skype, and it seems like a fun way for students to practice their skills. 

 

As I continue to learn how to incorporate technology into my classroom, I think this would definitely be something I would consider doing in my future classroom. It seems to be successful and beneficial for students in more than one way, and it could evolve into something bigger, and also helps their communication skills. Something like this would definitely help children stay engaged in the activity. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Why You Need A Good Relationship With Difficult Students — Smart Classroom Management

Why You Need A Good Relationship With Difficult Students — Smart Classroom Management | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
Most teachers have a less-than positive relationship with difficult students—although it isn’t always evident to those around them. Indeed, the teacher may not yell, scold, or berate them in front of their classmates, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t resentment […]
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

This advice is really helpful for any teacher. Though every teacher says they don't have favorite students, and those they don't like, it more likely isn't true. I've always believed the best way to control a child's bad behavior is to connect with them on a new level. To build a relationship with someone will help gain their trust, and I believe thats what a child needs. I think the idea of this is something that a lot of teachers struggle with because sometimes first impressions can affect what you think of someone for a long time. But, children are in a stage of development where they are constantly learning and changing, and that is what we need to keep in mind when learning about these students. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen

Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
Ah, listening, the neglected literacy skill. I know when I was a high school English teacher this was not necessarily a primary focus; I was too busy honing the more measurable literacy skills -- r
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Are You Being Fair?

Are You Being Fair? | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
Educators share tips for avoiding favoritism in the classroom.
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

I found this article very helpful because I believe that teachers without thought have favorite students, and students they dislike, which can bias several things in the classroom. The NEA gives great tips for teachers to create fairness to all students. I think the idea of being fair in the classroom is so crucial because teachers do not only teach academic materials, we have to guide children through all types of development, and being fair in the world to all people is important. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

▶ English Language Learners: Culture, Equity and Language - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

I really liked that this video shows current teachers who were ELL students at one point in their life. They can connect with the students on a new level because they understand what they are going through. This perspective really opened my eyes because as the teacher talks they understand as a teacher, student, and parent all in one. They understand that their culture is rich, and they shouldn't feel that they aren't important just because they don't feel the same as everyone else. This video really helps you understand the point of view of everyone involved in an ELL student's life. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

MN2020: Enough Teaching to the Test - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

This video shares what some teachers feel about No Child Left Behind. I agree with them completely that all the tests that are required leave students with no choice. Students are unable to learn about rich and detailed topics because everything has changed to revolve around tests. The teachers look defeated with the fact that they have no other option but to teach to the test even though they hate it. There are so many different learners in one school that these tests take away the importance of individual needs. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Disadvantages of High Stakes Testing in Elementary Schools

Disadvantages of High Stakes Testing in Elementary Schools | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
High stakes testing has become common in elementary schools across the United States, as governments and schools try to work together to improve standards, teaching quality and learning. In ...
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

This article shares the dangers of High Stakes Testing for younger children. The author explains that these types of tests have become more popular, but come with serious consequences. It causes high pressure on students, low morale, consequences for low scores, teaching to the test, and poor design. 

 

I feel like these high stakes tests are detrimental to students, teachers, and schools. Young students should not have the stress and pressure to excel on these tests, which if not done well could affect self-esteem and self-worth. Not only does it affect students, but gives teachers much added stress as well. Since teachers are nervous, they start teaching to the test which eventually eliminates rich discussion and other extracurricular classes that are important for child development. The idea of this scares me, and I hope eventually the system changes because I want to have enough time to involve my students in other activities besides preparing for a test. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Effective Discipline Practices in Elementary School

Effective Discipline Practices in Elementary School | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
An effective discipline plan that is clearly understood by students, teacher and parents can lead to student success. It is imperative that students fully understand behavioral expectations and ...
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

This article shares different methods that the author found effective and should help lead to student success. The steps that the author chose seem very similar to those that I experienced while I was in elementary school. The steps that they chose seem appropriate and simple enough for teachers to follow and have a successful outcome. The steps included non-verbal redirection, conferencing with the student, parent contact, teacher consequence, and administrative referral. 

 

After being exposed to different classroom settings over the last three years, I have seen discipline done in several different ways. Some that I feel are more appropriate than others. The steps that this article takes seems something similar to what I would more likely follow in my own classroom, but I would like to learn more methods to see what has the best outcome for unwanted behavior. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

Common Core: Myths and Facts - US News

Common Core: Myths and Facts - US News | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
As the new standards roll out across the country, myths and misconceptions abound.
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

Common Core is something I didn't experience during my time in the public school system. This article explained what exactly Common Core is, and clarified a lot of misconceptions about it. Since I didn't know much about Common Core to start with, I think this article will help steer me in the right direction. It seems like the opinions on Common Core are split, and there are either supporters or opposers. This may lead to biased articles on Common Core, so it is good to understand these misconceptions about it. 

 

Since Common Core is becoming more country wide, it is important for me to stay informed on it because it will be something I will more likely be using in my future classroom. This article has intrigued me, and I definitely want to become more informed on Common Core and what others think about it. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cassidy Stieffenhofer
Scoop.it!

The Case Against Homework

The Case Against Homework | EDCI 280 | Scoop.it
The Case Against Homework: The truth, according to Sara Bennett and Nancy Kalish, is that there is almost no evidence that homework helps elementary school students achieve academic success and little more that it helps older students.
Cassidy Stieffenhofer's insight:

No homework in Elementary School is something I've always felt strong about. I actually wrote an argumentative paper on this topic, and believe that it does more harm than good. Children in the elementary age need plenty of time to play and read, and homework is causing them too much stress. Looking at this link, I read an excerpt of this book, "The Case Against Homework" by Sara Bennett and Nancy Kalish. After reading this, I couldn't agree more with what they had to say. 

 

No homework would be something I'd like to apply in my future classroom. An excerpt like this could help me reason with parents or other faculty that may disagree with me. The No Homework policy is something I'd like to talk to my future principal with because it could benefit the students. 

more...
No comment yet.