edanne
Follow
Find tag "neuroscience"
98 views | +0 today
edanne
nursing education
Curated by anne macleod
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by anne macleod from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns | edanne | Scoop.it

"When you’re standing in front of a classroom of students who’re not quite sure they even want to be in your class, much less pay attention to what’s being said, things like neuroscience, research studies, and teaching the way the brain learns are an abstraction.

Yet, brain-targeted teaching can engage and excite students because it taps into factors that stimulate the brain, grab the attention, and set the stage for learning."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Nicole Wallace's curator insight, March 19, 2014 12:57 AM

Great comments in here and how it links to neurobiology.

Helen Teague's curator insight, March 19, 2014 12:48 PM
strong>Referencing Beth Dichter's insight:What if we were able to design our curriculum to support the way the brain learns? Would our students be more engaged in class? Learn about this new model, Teach the Way the Brain Learns, in this post. There is a short discussion about some of the concepts as well as six brain targets, each of which includes a brief neuroscience explanation as well as a "translation" so that you will understand how to implement each target in your classroom. What are some of the targets? Brain Target 1: Establish the emotional climate for learning What does this mean? "Stress impedes learning." Make connections with students and then begin the lesson. Brain Target 2: Creating the Physical Learning Environment What does this mean? The physical space impacts our students. Changing the space may help them learn. What changes could you make in your classroom? Four additional brain targets are provided. You may also want to check out the website Brain Targeted Teaching (http://www.braintargetedteaching.org/) where you will find additional information as well as sample units that utilize this method (and a template to create your own lessons).
Jim Goldsmith's curator insight, July 28, 2014 3:29 PM

Six practical suggestions for applying neuroscience in the classroom.

Rescooped by anne macleod from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Better Teaching: Why You Bore Students & What You Can Do About It

Better Teaching: Why You Bore Students & What You Can Do About It | edanne | Scoop.it

"You don’t mean to bore students. In fact, sometimes you’re downright interesting–the students are engaged, the buzz in the room is palpable, and even the hesitant students are asking questions. But the fact of the matter is, even the most charismatic and experienced teachers bore students sometimes. But the good news is, it may not be your fault."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 3, 2013 9:26 PM

This post begins with a quote from Plato who "advised against force-feeding of facts to students" (those are not his words, but his words follow this quote) and then moves to the present day and what we know about learning based on neuroscience research into learning. 

Read about how "stress and curiosity edits which sensory information", how the brain has evolved and must make choices about which information to process based on the multititude of "sensory information" being received. This system, the Reticular Activating System or RAS, determines what passes from the lower brainstem to the higher regions.

Other sections include how the brain receives threats and that when it is not under stress the brain is ready to be engaged and learn. Learn ways to work with students so they are engaged and learning, and willing to answer the question "What did you learn in school today?"

Audrey's comment, February 4, 2013 5:57 AM
Teaching is a two way process. Students of all ages should be encouraged to take a more active part in their learning. When students say to teachers "we want the lesson to be more fun". Why can students not explain what "fun" means? Why can they not demonstrate, using the learning materials how they would like the subject presented in a fun way?