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nursing education
Curated by anne macleod
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6 Common Misunderstandings About Assessment Of Learning

6 Common Misunderstandings About Assessment Of Learning | edanne | Scoop.it

"Over the past two decades there has been a lot written, and much discussion, around the use effective use of assessment in the classroom.

Unfortunately many educators, particularly at the secondary school level, continue to cling tenaciously to “traditional” practices which are, at best ineffective and at worst, counterproductive to the goals of modern education.  Here are six common misconceptions about assessment and evaluation that we could stand to rethink."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 17, 2013 9:08 PM

Read the list below and see if you find yourself in one or more of these misunderstandings...and for more information on each click through to the post.

1. Assessment and evaluation are the same. 

2. Most assessment is summative. 

3. Assessment is one way communication, the teacher gives feedback on student work. 

4. Assessment is for grading purposes.

5. Student work should be given a grade or a mark. 

6. If assignments are late, a teacher should deduct points. 

 

Rescooped by anne macleod from Using Your Whole Brain
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Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain

Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain | edanne | Scoop.it
Storytelling is one of the most overused and underused techniques at the same time. In this post, we are revealing what storytelling does to our brains.

Long before we had writing as we know it there has been an oral tradition of storytelling. This post looks at the science around storytelling.

Learn about how a story "can put your whole brain to work" and why "our brains become more active when we tell stories." Find out why the brain "learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases" and much more. If you enjoy telling stories, writing stories, or listening to stories check out this post to learn more!


Via Beth Dichter, Audrey
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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, July 10, 2013 5:22 PM

Excellent!

44Doors's curator insight, March 11, 2014 10:27 AM

"Anything you’ve experienced, you can get others to experience the same. Or at least, get their brain areas that you’ve activated that way, active too:"

 

"use simple, yet heartfelt language."

"Quick last fact: Our brain learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases that used to make stories awesome"

Art Jones's curator insight, October 28, 2014 5:50 PM

"our brains become more active when we tell stories."