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Sweden Riots: Islamism Sends Stockholm Up in Flames

Sweden Riots Islamism Sends Stockholm Up in Flames Over the past week, Muslim immigrants have been on the rampage , destroying Swedish businesses, burning vehicles, attacking policemen , and waging a war against Western civilization. This is the breaking point for Sweden, and if the country is to succeed in preserving its liberties, then it must have a complete overhaul of its immigration policies, which have permitted millions of Muslim immigrants into the country — immigrants who have no interest whatsoever in assimilating into Swedish culture. Rioting began on the May 19 when a Muslim man was gunned down by policeman in Stockholm after he brandished a machete and attempted to kill them. Muslims claimed that this was police brutality , and took the streets to protest. This has resulted in more than 300 cars being burnt by Islamist thugs, and damages are likely to cost billions of dollars. The irony of the situation is that no police brutality occurred whatsoever, for the police had every right to gun down the madman who was attempting to kill them. Nevertheless the fanaticism that has come about due to the killing has reinvigorated those who are fundamentally opposed to mass immigration from Muslim nations. It is well known that Sweden has been a safe haven for those who wish to seek asylum , or simply live off of hard-working people, due to its welfare state that has been taken advantage by those who are lazy and refuse to work. The fact of the matter is that regardless of what occurs, the welfare state will not be abolished, nor should it be, for it has become evident that the welfare system implemented by the Nordic countries has been a tremendous success. The problem is that many of the immigrants, including most of the Muslims, have no interest contributing to society , for they wish to retreat into their slums, live off the state, and attack policeman, ambulances, and anyone else who is not Muslim. The line must be drawn, and it is becoming clear that only the Swedish Democrats are willing to stand up for Swedish values in a non-fascist way. Their leader, and member of Parliament, Jimmie Akesson, has made it clear that his nation has an " extreme immigration problem ." The only way this will be fixed is by dramatically decreasing the number of immigrants coming in from Muslim nations, and putting an end to the absurd multicultural program being pushed through by the political elite in both Sweden, and the European Union. PolicyMic

ded4219e's insight:

Sweden Riots Islamism Sends Stockholm Up in Flames Over the past week, Muslim immigrants have been on the rampage , destroying Swedish businesses, burning vehicles, attacking policemen , and waging a war against Western civilization. This is the breaking point for Sweden, and if the country is to succeed in preserving its liberties, then it must have a complete overhaul of its immigration policies, which have permitted millions of Muslim immigrants into the country — immigrants who have no interest whatsoever in assimilating into Swedish culture. Rioting began on the May 19 when a Muslim man was gunned down by policeman in Stockholm after he brandished a machete and attempted to kill them. Muslims claimed that this was police brutality , and took the streets to protest. This has resulted in more than 300 cars being burnt by Islamist thugs, and damages are likely to cost billions of dollars. The irony of the situation is that no police brutality occurred whatsoever, for the police had every right to gun down the madman who was attempting to kill them. Nevertheless the fanaticism that has come about due to the killing has reinvigorated those who are fundamentally opposed to mass immigration from Muslim nations. It is well known that Sweden has been a safe haven for those who wish to seek asylum , or simply live off of hard-working people, due to its welfare state that has been taken advantage by those who are lazy and refuse to work. The fact of the matter is that regardless of what occurs, the welfare state will not be abolished, nor should it be, for it has become evident that the welfare system implemented by the Nordic countries has been a tremendous success. The problem is that many of the immigrants, including most of the Muslims, have no interest contributing to society , for they wish to retreat into their slums, live off the state, and attack policeman, ambulances, and anyone else who is not Muslim. The line must be drawn, and it is becoming clear that only the Swedish Democrats are willing to stand up for Swedish values in a non-fascist way. Their leader, and member of Parliament, Jimmie Akesson, has made it clear that his nation has an " extreme immigration problem ." The only way this will be fixed is by dramatically decreasing the number of immigrants coming in from Muslim nations, and putting an end to the absurd multicultural program being pushed through by the political elite in both Sweden, and the European Union. PolicyMic

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Job market gains could lead Fed to taper QE3 early

Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank Ben Bernanke attends the Treasury Department's Financial Stability Oversight Council in Washington April 25, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Gary Cameron By Ann Saphir and Jonathan Spicer Sun May 19, 2013 8:02am EDT (Reuters) - The beginning of the end of the Federal Reserve's massive bond-buying program might come sooner than many investors think if recent gains in the U.S. labor market do not prove fleeting. Much will depend on how economic data, which has given mixed signals for growth prospects, develops over the next few months. Reports on job growth in particular will go a long way in helping Fed officials determine whether the time is right to trim the pace of their $ 85 billion in monthly purchases. The marked improvement in the labor market since the U.S. central bank began its third round of quantitative easing, or QE3, has added an edge to calls by some policy hawks to dial down the stimulus. The roughly 50 percent jump in monthly job creation since the program began has even won renewed support from centrists, raising at least some chance the Fed could ratchet back its buying as early as next month. "We could reduce somewhat the pace of our securities purchases, perhaps as early as this summer," San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President John Williams said on Thursday, adding that his view is that summer begins in mid-June. The central bank next meets to debate policy on June 18-19. The Fed's balance sheet has swelled to some $ 3.3 trillion and officials have been debating whether this risks igniting future inflation or blowing up asset bubbles, even as they seek to help a tepid economic recovery. Chairman Ben Bernanke and other top Fed officials have increasingly stressed that any change to the pace of QE3 would not signal a withdrawal of monetary stimulus and that they could continue the program for quite some time at a lower level or even increase it again if needed. Most economists do not expect a tapering of bond buying until later in the year, in part because of weak readings on inflation. But Williams' remarks prompted a drop in stocks and a rebound in the dollar, with the greenback gaining further on Friday as investors prepared for a lessening of stimulus. "It seems many Fed officials are becoming increasingly uncomfortable with the $ 85 billion per-month rut they find themselves in," said Dana Saporta, an economist at Credit Suisse in New York. Still, Saporta does not expect the first adjustment in the purchases until September, although she would not rule out a move in June. "I do think they are concerned the longer they maintain this $ 85 billion pace, the more exaggerated or adverse the market reaction will be when the time comes finally to make an adjustment," she said. "The more flexible and varied they are, the less exaggerated the market reactions may be." Bernanke has sought to emphasize exactly this flexibility. In March, he said it makes more sense to have a variable policy in which the flow of purchases responds "in a more continuous or sensitive way to changes in the outlook." The Fed's policy-setting committee memorialized that approach in the statement they issued after their last meeting, on May 1, saying they were "prepared to increase or reduce" the purchases as labor-market or inflation forecasts change. Bernanke is scheduled to hold a news conference after the June meeting where he could explain any policy shift and try to assuage anxious investors that the Fed remains highly accommodative. The next meeting is in late July, but the next opportunity to talk to the media is not until mid-September. SOMETHING LESS THAN 'SUBSTANTIAL' Since the Great Recession, the Fed has kept interest rates near zero and taken other extraordinary steps to get Americans back to work, including promising to keep buying bonds until the labor market outlook improves "substantially." But it has never specified what it might take to prompt a reduction in its monthly purchases. Monthly payroll growth has averaged 208,000 in the last six months, compared with 141,000 in the six months prior to the launch of QE3 in September. The unemployment rate dropped to 7.5 percent last month from 8.1 percent in August. Policy hawks have seized on this improvement to argue that tapering should begin. "I don't think there is any question ... that we've seen substantial improvement in the labor market outlook over the last six months," Jeffrey Lacker, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, said earlier this month. Williams, for his part, said he was more confident the upturn in the labor market would endure, saying that "nearly all" of the indicators he watches suggest further gains over the next six months. One gauge of future economic growth compiled by the Economic Cycle Research Institute recently hit a two-year high. STAY THE COURSE? Still, the economic picture is far from clear and the recovery has stumbled midway in each of the last three years. The housing market has continued its slow rebound, while retail sales unexpectedly jumped last month, prompting some economists to boost gross domestic product growth projections. But the factory sector looks headed for a third straight monthly decline and most forecasters expect the economy to expand at only about a 2 percent annual rate in the second quarter. Growth of more than 2.5 percent over several quarters is generally needed to lower the still high jobless rate. Inflation has also slowed, which is a key reason most Wall Street economists are betting the central bank stays the course for a few more months. Consumer prices rose just 1.1 percent in the year through April, well below the Fed's 2 percent goal. Notably, however, the Fed's policy doves have not jumped on weaker inflation as reason to boost the monthly bond buys. "I think it's way too early to think like that," Chicago Fed President Charles Evans said earlier this month. 'BALANCING ACT' The risks of buying so many bonds might take center stage on Wednesday when Bernanke testifies to Congress and the central bank releases minutes of its most recent policy meeting. Concerns have grown that the longer the Fed snaps up assets at the current pace, the greater the risk that bond and stock markets - which have run up in the QE3 period - will snap back violently when purchases finally slow. "I think the Fed's got a very difficult balancing act here in removing ... QE from the market," Goldman Sachs President Gary Cohn told CNBC on Wednesday. "It wouldn't be surprising to me if they tried little maneuvers here and there." Yields on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note are likely to rise only by about half a percentage point by the end of the year if the Fed begins to trim monthly bond purchases in December, as JPMorgan currently expects, economists at that bank said. "The Fed is really trying to avoid surprises to the market," said Garth Friesen, a principal at hedge fund III Associates who also sits on the New York Fed's investor advisory committee. "But as long as we don't get deterioration in the labor market, that could also tilt in the favor of discussing tapering in June, or having it start sooner rather than later." (Reporting

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Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank Ben Bernanke attends the Treasury Department's Financial Stability Oversight Council in Washington April 25, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Gary Cameron By Ann Saphir and Jonathan Spicer Sun May 19, 2013 8:02am EDT (Reuters) - The beginning of the end of the Federal Reserve's massive bond-buying program might come sooner than many investors think if recent gains in the U.S. labor market do not prove fleeting. Much will depend on how economic data, which has given mixed signals for growth prospects, develops over the next few months. Reports on job growth in particular will go a long way in helping Fed officials determine whether the time is right to trim the pace of their $ 85 billion in monthly purchases. The marked improvement in the labor market since the U.S. central bank began its third round of quantitative easing, or QE3, has added an edge to calls by some policy hawks to dial down the stimulus. The roughly 50 percent jump in monthly job creation since the program began has even won renewed support from centrists, raising at least some chance the Fed could ratchet back its buying as early as next month. "We could reduce somewhat the pace of our securities purchases, perhaps as early as this summer," San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President John Williams said on Thursday, adding that his view is that summer begins in mid-June. The central bank next meets to debate policy on June 18-19. The Fed's balance sheet has swelled to some $ 3.3 trillion and officials have been debating whether this risks igniting future inflation or blowing up asset bubbles, even as they seek to help a tepid economic recovery. Chairman Ben Bernanke and other top Fed officials have increasingly stressed that any change to the pace of QE3 would not signal a withdrawal of monetary stimulus and that they could continue the program for quite some time at a lower level or even increase it again if needed. Most economists do not expect a tapering of bond buying until later in the year, in part because of weak readings on inflation. But Williams' remarks prompted a drop in stocks and a rebound in the dollar, with the greenback gaining further on Friday as investors prepared for a lessening of stimulus. "It seems many Fed officials are becoming increasingly uncomfortable with the $ 85 billion per-month rut they find themselves in," said Dana Saporta, an economist at Credit Suisse in New York. Still, Saporta does not expect the first adjustment in the purchases until September, although she would not rule out a move in June. "I do think they are concerned the longer they maintain this $ 85 billion pace, the more exaggerated or adverse the market reaction will be when the time comes finally to make an adjustment," she said. "The more flexible and varied they are, the less exaggerated the market reactions may be." Bernanke has sought to emphasize exactly this flexibility. In March, he said it makes more sense to have a variable policy in which the flow of purchases responds "in a more continuous or sensitive way to changes in the outlook." The Fed's policy-setting committee memorialized that approach in the statement they issued after their last meeting, on May 1, saying they were "prepared to increase or reduce" the purchases as labor-market or inflation forecasts change. Bernanke is scheduled to hold a news conference after the June meeting where he could explain any policy shift and try to assuage anxious investors that the Fed remains highly accommodative. The next meeting is in late July, but the next opportunity to talk to the media is not until mid-September. SOMETHING LESS THAN 'SUBSTANTIAL' Since the Great Recession, the Fed has kept interest rates near zero and taken other extraordinary steps to get Americans back to work, including promising to keep buying bonds until the labor market outlook improves "substantially." But it has never specified what it might take to prompt a reduction in its monthly purchases. Monthly payroll growth has averaged 208,000 in the last six months, compared with 141,000 in the six months prior to the launch of QE3 in September. The unemployment rate dropped to 7.5 percent last month from 8.1 percent in August. Policy hawks have seized on this improvement to argue that tapering should begin. "I don't think there is any question ... that we've seen substantial improvement in the labor market outlook over the last six months," Jeffrey Lacker, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, said earlier this month. Williams, for his part, said he was more confident the upturn in the labor market would endure, saying that "nearly all" of the indicators he watches suggest further gains over the next six months. One gauge of future economic growth compiled by the Economic Cycle Research Institute recently hit a two-year high. STAY THE COURSE? Still, the economic picture is far from clear and the recovery has stumbled midway in each of the last three years. The housing market has continued its slow rebound, while retail sales unexpectedly jumped last month, prompting some economists to boost gross domestic product growth projections. But the factory sector looks headed for a third straight monthly decline and most forecasters expect the economy to expand at only about a 2 percent annual rate in the second quarter. Growth of more than 2.5 percent over several quarters is generally needed to lower the still high jobless rate. Inflation has also slowed, which is a key reason most Wall Street economists are betting the central bank stays the course for a few more months. Consumer prices rose just 1.1 percent in the year through April, well below the Fed's 2 percent goal. Notably, however, the Fed's policy doves have not jumped on weaker inflation as reason to boost the monthly bond buys. "I think it's way too early to think like that," Chicago Fed President Charles Evans said earlier this month. 'BALANCING ACT' The risks of buying so many bonds might take center stage on Wednesday when Bernanke testifies to Congress and the central bank releases minutes of its most recent policy meeting. Concerns have grown that the longer the Fed snaps up assets at the current pace, the greater the risk that bond and stock markets - which have run up in the QE3 period - will snap back violently when purchases finally slow. "I think the Fed's got a very difficult balancing act here in removing ... QE from the market," Goldman Sachs President Gary Cohn told CNBC on Wednesday. "It wouldn't be surprising to me if they tried little maneuvers here and there." Yields on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note are likely to rise only by about half a percentage point by the end of the year if the Fed begins to trim monthly bond purchases in December, as JPMorgan currently expects, economists at that bank said. "The Fed is really trying to avoid surprises to the market," said Garth Friesen, a principal at hedge fund III Associates who also sits on the New York Fed's investor advisory committee. "But as long as we don't get deterioration in the labor market, that could also tilt in the favor of discussing tapering in June, or having it start sooner rather than later." (Reporting

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VIDEO: IBD Market Wrap

Stocks declined Wednesday, giving back of portion of Tuesday's strong gains. Thanks for checking us out. Please take a look at the rest of our videos and articles. To stay in the loop, bookmark our homepage .

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Stocks declined Wednesday, giving back of portion of Tuesday's strong gains. Thanks for checking us out. Please take a look at the rest of our videos and articles. To stay in the loop, bookmark our homepage .

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Just Who Was Rand Paul's Apology For?

Yesterday, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) offered a blunt apology to Apple CEO Tim Cook, scolding his fellow senators for criticizing Cook and his company for using offshore havens to avoid billions in tax bills. "I frankly think the committee should apologize to Apple," Paul said at a hearing of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, which had just released a report finding Apple had avoided paying billions in taxes by setting up shell companies in other countries, such as Ireland. "I'm offended by the spectacle of dragging in executives from an American company that is not doing anything illegal." Apple doesn't have a PAC, so it can't reward Paul for his outrage on the company's behalf, but Paul is planning a trip to Silicon Valley next week, where he'll be meeting with top tech execs, according to media reports . Paul doesn't historically have a close connection with any Silicon Valley companies, but he has had some luck in the region -- and with high-tech execs -- and his Apple-friendly attitude might help his fundraising next week. According to CRP data, 94019 is one of Paul's top 10 zip codes for fundraising. That would be Half Moon Bay, Calif., the ritzy seaside home to tech millionaires like Scott Banister, an early investor in PayPal, who along with his wife Cyan, has given more than $ 100,000 to Paul's campaign or committees and super PACs backing him or his father, Ron. Overall, the computer and Internet industry has not been hugely supportive of Paul. According to CRP records, it is his 18th largest source of suppor t, having given him a little more than $ 50,000. Almost all of that came from individuals, not corporate PACs. But the industry has been a source of campaign cash for Paul's father' and the various outside spending groups that sprouted up to support libertarian causes. The ninth largest donor to outside spending groups in the 2012 election was Peter Thiel, the founder of PayPal, who donated $ 4.7 million to conservative groups. They included Revolution PAC , a general pro-libertarian super PAC, and Endorse Liberty , a super PAC that supported Ron Paul's presidential run. Both organizations were heavily supported by the computer and Internet industry -- in fact, the industry was the second largest source of cash for Endorse Liberty. Overall, it gave about $ 14.1 million to outside spending groups , of which more than half ($ 7.8 million) went to Republicans. In terms of its $ 64.3 million in overall donations -- to candidates, parties and other committees -- only 32 percent went to Republicans. Democrats picked up 47 percent of the total, and the rest went to groups not affiliated directly with either party. The fact that the industry is not particularly partisan, and may share some natural affinities with the libertarian cause -- like the industry's longstanding argument that fewer taxes and immigration regulations would let loose a flood of cash and investment in innovation and growth for Silicon Valley -- is likely not lost on Paul. And his defense of Apple's business tactics might unleash a flood of Silicon Valley cash for his own cause next week. OpenSecrets Blog

ded4219e's insight:

Yesterday, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) offered a blunt apology to Apple CEO Tim Cook, scolding his fellow senators for criticizing Cook and his company for using offshore havens to avoid billions in tax bills. "I frankly think the committee should apologize to Apple," Paul said at a hearing of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, which had just released a report finding Apple had avoided paying billions in taxes by setting up shell companies in other countries, such as Ireland. "I'm offended by the spectacle of dragging in executives from an American company that is not doing anything illegal." Apple doesn't have a PAC, so it can't reward Paul for his outrage on the company's behalf, but Paul is planning a trip to Silicon Valley next week, where he'll be meeting with top tech execs, according to media reports . Paul doesn't historically have a close connection with any Silicon Valley companies, but he has had some luck in the region -- and with high-tech execs -- and his Apple-friendly attitude might help his fundraising next week. According to CRP data, 94019 is one of Paul's top 10 zip codes for fundraising. That would be Half Moon Bay, Calif., the ritzy seaside home to tech millionaires like Scott Banister, an early investor in PayPal, who along with his wife Cyan, has given more than $ 100,000 to Paul's campaign or committees and super PACs backing him or his father, Ron. Overall, the computer and Internet industry has not been hugely supportive of Paul. According to CRP records, it is his 18th largest source of suppor t, having given him a little more than $ 50,000. Almost all of that came from individuals, not corporate PACs. But the industry has been a source of campaign cash for Paul's father' and the various outside spending groups that sprouted up to support libertarian causes. The ninth largest donor to outside spending groups in the 2012 election was Peter Thiel, the founder of PayPal, who donated $ 4.7 million to conservative groups. They included Revolution PAC , a general pro-libertarian super PAC, and Endorse Liberty , a super PAC that supported Ron Paul's presidential run. Both organizations were heavily supported by the computer and Internet industry -- in fact, the industry was the second largest source of cash for Endorse Liberty. Overall, it gave about $ 14.1 million to outside spending groups , of which more than half ($ 7.8 million) went to Republicans. In terms of its $ 64.3 million in overall donations -- to candidates, parties and other committees -- only 32 percent went to Republicans. Democrats picked up 47 percent of the total, and the rest went to groups not affiliated directly with either party. The fact that the industry is not particularly partisan, and may share some natural affinities with the libertarian cause -- like the industry's longstanding argument that fewer taxes and immigration regulations would let loose a flood of cash and investment in innovation and growth for Silicon Valley -- is likely not lost on Paul. And his defense of Apple's business tactics might unleash a flood of Silicon Valley cash for his own cause next week. OpenSecrets Blog

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VIDEO: Conn. Gov. Malloy: Train Derailing Most Likely Accident

The first responders suspect the derailment might have been caused by mechanical failure. Gov. Dan Malloy says the crash is being investigated. Thanks for checking us out. Please take a look at the rest of our videos and articles. To stay in the loop, bookmark our homepage .

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The first responders suspect the derailment might have been caused by mechanical failure. Gov. Dan Malloy says the crash is being investigated. Thanks for checking us out. Please take a look at the rest of our videos and articles. To stay in the loop, bookmark our homepage .

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