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Learning Glass helps UW-Stout professors connect with online students

Learning Glass helps UW-Stout professors connect with online students | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it

Learning Glass is a see-through blackboard with a twist.

 

Assistant Professor Julie Zaloudek: “With Learning Glass, you can see the instructors’ passion for the content we’re teaching. The student has the perception that we’re looking at them, and we like that.”

 

The idea for Learning Glass came from Jamison Patrick, of the Stout Online instructional design team. He saw a video about Learning Glass by a San Diego State professor who created one.

Patrick and Mike Cropp at the UW-Stout Discovery Center Fab Lab designed and built their own Learning Glass last fall using quarter-inch thick tempered glass mounted on a stand. Learning Technology Services created the set for videotaping.

“This provides an opportunity to be more engaging to our students,” Patrick said. “It’s low-cost and the return on investment is high. The possibilities are endless with e-learning.”


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 16, 2:03 PM

The creative engergy of well trained minds is just part of what makes online teaching and learning a vital field. Kudos to the Fab-Lab and the committed educators of Stout Online.

Anita Harris's curator insight, April 19, 6:59 PM
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What is creativity? Twenty-one authentic definitions you'll love [free poster] - Copyblogger

What is creativity? Twenty-one authentic definitions you'll love [free poster] - Copyblogger | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it

"The Writer Files has gathered thought-provoking responses to the question, "What is creativity?" Check out these 21 definitions from top content creatives ..."


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 13, 9:49 AM
There can be no single definition of anything.
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Machines are becoming more creative than humans

Machines are becoming more creative than humans | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it

Can machines be creative? Recent successes in AI have shown that machines can now perform at human levels in many tasks that, just a few years ago, were considered to be decades away, like driving cars, understanding spoken language, and recognizing objects. But these are all tasks where we know what needs to be done, and the machine is just imitating us. What about tasks where the right answers are not known? Can machines be programmed to find solutions on their own, and perhaps even come up with creative solutions that humans would find difficult?

 

The answer is a definite yes! There are branches of AI focused precisely on this challenge, including evolutionary computation and reinforcement learning. Like the popular deep learning methods, which are responsible for many of the recent AI successes, these branches of AI have benefitted from the million-fold increase in computing power we’ve seen over the last two decades. There arenow antennas in spacecraft so complex they could only be designed through computational evolution. There are game playing agents in Othello, Backgammon, and most recently in Go that have learned to play at the level of the best humans, and in the case of AlphaGo, even beyond the ability of the best humans. There are non-player characters in Unreal Tournament that have evolved to be indistinguishable from humans, thereby passing the Turing test— at least for game bots. And in finance, there are computational traders in the stock market evolved to make real money.

 

Many new applications have suddenly come within our reach thanks to computational creativity — even though most of us do not realize it yet. If you are facing a design problem where potential solutions can be tested automatically, chances are you could evolve those solutions automatically as well. In areas where computers are already used to draft designs, the natural next step is to harness evolutionary search. This will allow human designers to gain more traction for their ideas, such as machine parts that are easier to manufacture, stock portfolios that minimize risk, or websites that result in more conversions. In other areas, it may take some engineering effort to define the design problem for the computer, but the effort may be rewarded by truly novel designs, such as finless rockets, new video game genres, personalized preventive medicine, and safer and more efficient traffic.


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Designing Next-Generation Universities

Designing Next-Generation Universities | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it

Learning by Doing Education, like life itself, should not be a spectator sport. Merely listening or even reading may create the illusion of learning, but without active engagement, retention of course material, or the ability to apply it, is laughably low. Students who engage in hands-on activities understand concepts more deeply and remember them more accurately.
 
Project-based, case-based, and team-based learning and problem-solving are activity-based approaches to teaching and learning, allowing students to become creators of knowledge rather than mere recipients of knowledge.
 
Students might annotate a text or play or work of art, map and analyze data, visually represent change over time, document a neighborhood or community. The web can then make student projects and research publicly accessible.
 
By learning by doing can take even richer forms. A solver community brings together students and faculty to “crowdsource” innovative solutions to the critical challenges of our time. Tackling a real-world challenge is a proven way to nurture a community of engage, creative learners. One of the broader goals is to transform a class of students into a knowledge network, an ongoing community that can continue to partner and share expertise and insights.
 
Then there are maker spaces. These are innovation greenhouses, incubators, or accelerators where innovators – whether faculty, students, staff, or others from outside the campus – can work individually or collaborative on projects in a supportive environment.
 
A new kind of student populates many campuses defined not by demographic characteristics, but by mindset and aspirations. Extraordinarily entrepreneurial, these students, in their spare time, create apps, found start-ups, and devise creative solutions to a host of pressing environmental, health, and technology problems.

 


Via Gust MEES, Le Dong Phuong, Stephania Savva, Ph.D, Miloš Bajčetić
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Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 7:05 AM

Learning by Doing
Education, like life itself, should not be a spectator sport. Merely listening or even reading may create the illusion of learning, but without active engagement, retention of course material, or the ability to apply it, is laughably low. Students who engage in hands-on activities understand concepts more deeply and remember them more accurately.
 
Project-based, case-based, and team-based learning and problem-solving are activity-based approaches to teaching and learning, allowing students to become creators of knowledge rather than mere recipients of knowledge.
 
Students might annotate a text or play or work of art, map and analyze data, visually represent change over time, document a neighborhood or community. The web can then make student projects and research publicly accessible.
 
By learning by doing can take even richer forms. A solver community brings together students and faculty to “crowdsource” innovative solutions to the critical challenges of our time. Tackling a real-world challenge is a proven way to nurture a community of engage, creative learners. One of the broader goals is to transform a class of students into a knowledge network, an ongoing community that can continue to partner and share expertise and insights.
 
Then there are maker spaces. These are innovation greenhouses, incubators, or accelerators where innovators – whether faculty, students, staff, or others from outside the campus – can work individually or collaborative on projects in a supportive environment.
 
A new kind of student populates many campuses defined not by demographic characteristics, but by mindset and aspirations. Extraordinarily entrepreneurial, these students, in their spare time, create apps, found start-ups, and devise creative solutions to a host of pressing environmental, health, and technology problems.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 7:38 AM

Learning by Doing
Education, like life itself, should not be a spectator sport. Merely listening or even reading may create the illusion of learning, but without active engagement, retention of course material, or the ability to apply it, is laughably low. Students who engage in hands-on activities understand concepts more deeply and remember them more accurately.
 
Project-based, case-based, and team-based learning and problem-solving are activity-based approaches to teaching and learning, allowing students to become creators of knowledge rather than mere recipients of knowledge.
 
Students might annotate a text or play or work of art, map and analyze data, visually represent change over time, document a neighborhood or community. The web can then make student projects and research publicly accessible.
 
By learning by doing can take even richer forms. A solver community brings together students and faculty to “crowdsource” innovative solutions to the critical challenges of our time. Tackling a real-world challenge is a proven way to nurture a community of engage, creative learners. One of the broader goals is to transform a class of students into a knowledge network, an ongoing community that can continue to partner and share expertise and insights.
 
Then there are maker spaces. These are innovation greenhouses, incubators, or accelerators where innovators – whether faculty, students, staff, or others from outside the campus – can work individually or collaborative on projects in a supportive environment.
 
A new kind of student populates many campuses defined not by demographic characteristics, but by mindset and aspirations. Extraordinarily entrepreneurial, these students, in their spare time, create apps, found start-ups, and devise creative solutions to a host of pressing environmental, health, and technology problems.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

Barbara Monica Pérez Moo's curator insight, April 4, 10:43 PM

Learning by Doing
Education, like life itself, should not be a spectator sport. Merely listening or even reading may create the illusion of learning, but without active engagement, retention of course material, or the ability to apply it, is laughably low. Students who engage in hands-on activities understand concepts more deeply and remember them more accurately.
 
Project-based, case-based, and team-based learning and problem-solving are activity-based approaches to teaching and learning, allowing students to become creators of knowledge rather than mere recipients of knowledge.
 
Students might annotate a text or play or work of art, map and analyze data, visually represent change over time, document a neighborhood or community. The web can then make student projects and research publicly accessible.
 
By learning by doing can take even richer forms. A solver community brings together students and faculty to “crowdsource” innovative solutions to the critical challenges of our time. Tackling a real-world challenge is a proven way to nurture a community of engage, creative learners. One of the broader goals is to transform a class of students into a knowledge network, an ongoing community that can continue to partner and share expertise and insights.
 
Then there are maker spaces. These are innovation greenhouses, incubators, or accelerators where innovators – whether faculty, students, staff, or others from outside the campus – can work individually or collaborative on projects in a supportive environment.
 
A new kind of student populates many campuses defined not by demographic characteristics, but by mindset and aspirations. Extraordinarily entrepreneurial, these students, in their spare time, create apps, found start-ups, and devise creative solutions to a host of pressing environmental, health, and technology problems.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

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Donald Clark Plan B: One book on learning that every teacher, lecturer & trainer should read (7 reasons)

Donald Clark Plan B: One book on learning that every teacher, lecturer & trainer should read (7 reasons) | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
I have shelf upon shelf of books on learning but if I had to recommend just one book it would be Make It Stick by Brown, Roediger and McDaniel. It has one big weakness, and I’ll come to that later., but what makes it compelling is it’s its laser like focus on contemporary research on optimal methods of learning, while swatting pseudo-theories to one side.

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Simple Twist Improves Engagement: Mini-Scenarios for Assessment

Simple Twist Improves Engagement: Mini-Scenarios for Assessment | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Scenario-based learning often means complex branching or simulations, but it doesn’t always have to be that way. You can use mini-scenarios to make your assessments more relevant and valuable. One of the big advantages of using mini-scenarios is that they’re fast and easy to build. You don’t need any special tools; any tool that can create a multiple choice question can be used for mini-scenarios.

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steve batchelder's curator insight, March 16, 3:19 AM

A simple twist on the typical multiple choice question can improve engagement.  Try it?

Ines Bieler's curator insight, March 16, 3:54 AM

A simple twist on the typical multiple choice question can improve engagement.  Try it?

Andrew J Gibson's curator insight, April 4, 8:59 AM

A simple twist on the typical multiple choice question can improve engagement.  Try it?

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Online Adjunct Job Tips:  Advice from Online Professors

Online Adjunct Job Tips:  Advice from Online Professors | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
what are your best tips related to getting an online adjunct job, specifically?

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, March 29, 9:30 PM

Here's a list of hard won tips about applying for online jobs from the Baab Group. Everyone of these insights will help you reach your goal of teaching online.

juandoming's curator insight, March 31, 2:23 PM

Here's a list of hard won tips about applying for online jobs from the Baab Group. Everyone of these insights will help you reach your goal of teaching online.

Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 7:38 AM

Here's a list of hard won tips about applying for online jobs from the Baab Group. Everyone of these insights will help you reach your goal of teaching online.

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Blended Learning and Student Agency | NextGen Learning

Blended Learning and Student Agency | NextGen Learning | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Student agency is one of the reasons why next gen learning looks and feels different from traditional instructional practices.

Despite the best of intentions, whole group instruction that is teacher-centered or curriculum-centered tends to ignore the agency of individual students to own their learning and direct their own path through it. When student agency is embraced, the instructional model shifts to a student-centered learning model.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 4, 11:55 AM

I like the term used in this article: "student agency".  I see it as self directed learning a dispostion that fuels well designed online learning experiences.  This blended learaning oriented piece shows the (chaotic and essential ) way to educating kids as learners in a 21st century environment. 

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eLearning Psychology Myths

eLearning Psychology Myths | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
In this post, we’ll take a hard look at some of the common eLearning psychology myths to find the truth behind the fallacies.

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Distance Learning: 10 Ways To Keep Your Motivation High

Distance Learning: 10 Ways To Keep Your Motivation High | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Want to know how to keep your motivation high in Distance Learning? Check 10 ways to keep your motivation high in Distance Learning.

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Miguel Angel Perez Alvarez's curator insight, April 15, 1:01 PM
Hay veces que no encuentras elementos para mejorar el involucramiento de tus alumnos. Aquí algunos consejos prácticos
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The Neuroscience of Gamification: 10 Things You Should Know

The Neuroscience of Gamification: 10 Things You Should Know | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
This week, we’ve dug deep into our grey matter to bring you ten things you should know about the neuroscience of gamification in online learning.

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How to Create Quizzes for your Online Course using Typeform

How to Create Quizzes for your Online Course using Typeform | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Learn how to use Typeform to create quizzes for your online course with this step-by-step tutorial.

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EDTECH@UTRGV's curator insight, April 9, 11:33 AM

Cool Tool!

K_Lynam's curator insight, April 15, 8:08 PM
Great tool for flipped instruction! Can be used with any platform, not just thinkific. Lots of choice with free account! Check out www.typeform.comcoach-ks-academy.thinkific.com

Great tool for flipped instruction! Can be used with any platform, not just Thinkific. Lots of choice with Free account! Check out www.typeform.com (& help pages)!
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Cognitive Load Theory: Making learning more effective

Cognitive Load Theory: Making learning more effective | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Cognitive Load Theory builds upon the widely accepted model of human information processing shown in Figure 1 (this was published by Richard Atkinson and Richard Shiffrin in 1968.)

It describes the process as having three main parts: sensory memory, working memory and long-term memory. Since then, many researchers have added to our understanding of this concept, but the basic model remains the same.

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Dell Technical Support Phone Number 1 (800) 204-4427's curator insight, March 21, 12:14 PM
How to setup Dell Wireless Printer? http://goo.gl/nN9tuJ Installing a Dell #wireless_printer in your workplace enables your employees and co-workers to send print jobs without leaving their workspace. Setting up a Wi-Fi-capable printer can also help to Dial 1 (800) 749 0917 Toll Free Number
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Academic Digital Etiquette: Interacting in online spaces

Academic Digital Etiquette: Interacting in online spaces | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it

Celia's reflections:

 

"I have had many discussions with students about the protocols on interacting in online spaces in an academic or professional manner. Whether they be commenting on a blog or giving feedback in comments on a Google document or interacting in Edmodo or Google Classroom, students need to be modelled the ‘professional’ way to behave. Commenting within an academic context is in fact providing feedback and as such quite a complicated skill for a young student."


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 20, 2:01 PM

This thoughtful blog on "academic digital etiquette" offers excellent advice for students learning to work in academic discussion environments.

Marla Bucy's curator insight, April 22, 2:26 PM
This is the kind of information that I think students who must peer review each other's writing would find helpful: This blog entry provides useful adjectives without an overwhelming amount of instruction.
Aleta Chowfin's curator insight, May 4, 4:49 AM
Great article !
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Mapping the Brain to Build Better Machines | Quanta Magazine

Mapping the Brain to Build Better Machines |  Quanta Magazine | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
The Microns project aims to decipher the brain’s algorithms in an effort to revolutionize machine learning.

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Emotions, Learning and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience b

Emotions, Learning and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience b | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Educators have long known that students’ emotional experiences greatly impact their learning. Dr. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang offers a neurobiological account of why this may be the case. In Emotions, Learning, and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience, Immordino-Yang explains in a series of essays that the brain constructs complex emotional experiences that help us learn, socialize, and act morally by coopting the same brain regions that help us regulate our viscera and basic survival-related mechanisms. She argues that, contrary to centuries old theory that emotions interfere with rational thinking, our “emotional rudders” steer our rational actions and ability to learn. Learning occur through a complex interplay of our biological beings, psychological selves, and cultural contexts.

Immordino-Yang is uniquely positioned to offer insights from affective neuroscience for education because of her interdisciplinary background and experiences; she was a junior high school science teacher and currently is a human development and affective neuroscience researcher, an associate professor of education, psychology, and neuroscience at the University of Southern California, and the rising president of the International Mind Brain and Education Society. She encourages educators to join with her in a critical conversation about how to build bridges between an understanding of the complex process of students’ learning and feelings in real-world classroom settings and the lab-based neuroscientific research about the brain’s construction of emotion.

Immordino-Yang argues then that our ability to learn is contingent upon our ability to feel emotions. For example, individuals who suffered brain damage in a part of the frontal lobe that impacted their social and emotional behavior (but not IQ) were subsequently unable to develop intuitions in new learning situations to guide rational thought or action. Students benefit when emotions, such as interest and inspiration, are harnessed in the classroom and when educators respect students’ emotional intuitions. It is not surprising that these social emotional experiences matter so deeply for learning and creativity when we consider that our ability to feel these emotions is evolutionarily entwined with our ability to regulate our basic life-supporting physiological functioning (e.g., breathing).

In an fMRI experiment Immordino-Yang found that feeling admiration or compassion for other people activated brain networks associated with inwardly-directed thoughts rather than thoughts about the outside world. As such, she constructs a compelling argument that supporting students in developing their ability to reason complexly about the future and about social, emotional, and moral quandaries may necessitate giving students time to reflect and direct their thoughts inward.

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Peer Instruction for Active Learning - Eric Mazur

Harvard University Prof. Eric Mazur on difficulties of beginners, teaching each other, and making sense of information.


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Wright State University Center for Teaching and Learning's curator insight, April 6, 9:15 AM
"The better you know something, the more difficult it becomes to teach because you are no longer aware of the conceptual difficulties of the beginning learner".~Eric Mazur
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Attention Students: Put Your Laptops Away

Attention Students: Put Your Laptops Away | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it

As laptops become smaller and more ubiquitous, and with the advent of tablets, the idea of taking notes by hand just seems old-fashioned to many students today. Typing your notes is faster — which comes in handy when there's a lot of information to take down. But it turns out there are still advantages to doing things the old-fashioned way.

For one thing, research shows that laptops and tablets have a tendency to be distracting — it's so easy to click over to Facebook in that dull lecture. And a study has shown that the fact that you have to be slower when you take notes by hand is what makes it more useful in the long run.

In the study published in Psychological Science, Pam A. Mueller of Princeton University and Daniel M. Oppenheimer of the University of California, Los Angeles sought to test how notetaking by hand or by computer affects learning.

"When people type their notes they have this tendency to try to take verbatim notes and write down as much of the lecture as they can," Mueller tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "The students who were taking longhand notes in our studies were forced to be more selective — because you can't write as fast as you can type. And that extra processing of the material that they were doing benefited them."

Mueller and Oppenheimer cited that notetaking can be categorized two ways: generative and nongenerative. Generative notetaking pertains to "summarizing, paraphrasing, concept mapping," while nongenerative notetaking involves copying something verbatim.

And there are two hypotheses to why notetaking is beneficial in the first place. The first idea is called the encoding hypothesis, which says that when a person is taking notes, "the processing that occurs" will improve "learning and retention." The second, called the external-storage hypothesis, is that you learn by being able to look back at your notes, or even the notes of other people.

Because people can type faster than they write, using a laptop will make people more likely to try to transcribe everything they're hearing. So on the one hand, Mueller and Oppenheimer were faced with the question of whether the benefits of being able to look at your more complete, transcribed notes on a laptop outweighs the drawbacks of not processing that information. On the other hand, when writing longhand, you process the information better but have less to look back at.

For their first study, they took university students (the standard guinea pig of psychology) and showed them TED talks about various topics. Afterward, they found that the students who used laptops wrote significantly more words than those who took notes by hand. When testing how well the students remembered information, the researchers found a key point of divergence in the type of question. For questions that asked students to simply remember facts, like dates, both groups did equally well. But for "conceptual-application" questions, such as, "How do Japan and Sweden differ in their approaches to equality within their societies?" the laptop users did "significantly worse."

The same thing happened in the second study, even when they specifically told students using laptops to try to avoid writing things down verbatim. "Even when we told people they shouldn't be taking these verbatim notes, they were not able to overcome that instinct," Mueller says. The more words the students copied verbatim, the worse they performed on recall tests.


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 17, 9:57 AM
Writing and keyboarding use the brain differently which may help explain the retention aspect. This is one of those digitial literacy areas that teachers have the ability to help students with. The key will be support from the school managers and consultants who fancy themselves expert in everything classroom, althought they are not there. It will require retaining cursive writing, which some have argued to get rid of teaching this skill.
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Online Discussion Boards: Strategies to Ease Instructor Burden and Promote Student Learning - OLC

Online Discussion Boards: Strategies to Ease Instructor Burden and Promote Student Learning - OLC | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Because of mandated institutional engagement expectations, the discussion boards may take up the bulk of an online instructor’s time. To help alleviate discussion board burn-out, here are some strategies that can be used to promote student learning while reducing instructor workload:

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Daniel Jäggli's curator insight, March 30, 4:49 AM

These "tricks of the trade" will help any online instructor manage their time while improving student learning.

NancyEvans@ATS-LU's curator insight, March 30, 9:40 AM

These "tricks of the trade" will help any online instructor manage their time while improving student learning.

Claire Brooks's curator insight, March 30, 6:28 PM

These "tricks of the trade" will help any online instructor manage their time while improving student learning.

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Meeting the Needs of Online Teachers: Training and Challenges Research Webinar - 4/6 at 2pm EDT

Meeting the Needs of Online Teachers: Training and Challenges Research Webinar - 4/6 at 2pm EDT | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Meeting the Needs of Online Teachers: Training and Challenges
Wednesday, 4/6/16, 2pm EDT

This session will present findings from a survey of Wisconsin Virtual School teachers about professional development timing and topics, top instructional challenges, and perceived needs for additional professional development.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 4, 12:57 PM

This session reports findings from Wisconsin Virtual Schools.

 

All Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute webinars become available via their archive. If you miss the live date, you can still dig into the research.

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Blended Learning Toolkit: University of Central Florida and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities

Blended Learning Toolkit: University of Central Florida and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Abstract

The Blended Learning Toolkit supports the course redesign approach, and interest in its openly available clearinghouse of online tools, strategies, curricula, and other materials to support the adoption of blended learning continues to grow. When the resource originally launched in July 2011, 20 AASCU institutions used it, but now universities, colleges, and K–12 schools from around the world access the Blended Learning Toolkit.

This grantee profile from Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) provides at-a-glance information, course model design details, grant project activities, results and outcomes, participant impressions, next steps, and additional resources.

NGLC accelerates educational innovation through applied technology to dramatically improve college readiness and completion in the United States. To learn more about NGLC and the grantees it supports, visit nextgenlearning.org

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 4, 1:38 PM

Strong research based toolkit for blended learning.

NancyEvans@ATS-LU's curator insight, April 14, 11:28 AM
T
This is a good model, easily adapted for higher education.
 
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MIT releases Online Education Policy Initiative report

MIT releases Online Education Policy Initiative report | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
A new MIT report on online education policy analyzes the current state of higher education and consider how advances in learning science and online technology might shape its future.

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9 Myths About eLearning Authoring Tools And How To Use Them Properly

9 Myths About eLearning Authoring Tools And How To Use Them Properly | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Want to know some Myths About eLearning Authoring Tools? Check 9 Myths About eLearning Authoring Tools and how to use them properly.

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10 Uses for Gamification in Online Learning

10 Uses for Gamification in Online Learning | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
To give you some inspiration in your gamified online learning, here are 10 uses for gamification in online learning to make your training go further.

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Stewart-Marshall's curator insight, April 10, 8:45 AM
10 uses for gamification in online learning to make your training go further.
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 11, 6:32 AM
Online Learning is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about business education can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Won Ho's curator insight, April 11, 11:57 PM
Very basic things...

매우 당연한 이야기~
Rescooped by Rich Ingram from Tools for Teachers & Learners
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Interactive Ebook Creation & Digital Publishing Software

Interactive Ebook Creation & Digital Publishing Software | Ed Tech Scoops | Scoop.it
Create and publish interactive ebooks for Android, iPad, iPhone, HTML5 web, and desktop

Via Nik Peachey
Rich Ingram's insight:

Awesome free ebook creator software. Great for creating multimedia interactive text books.

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Татьяна Слесаренко's curator insight, April 1, 3:56 AM

Awesome free ebook creator software. Great for creating multimedia interactive text books.

martinet benoit's curator insight, April 2, 11:43 AM

Awesome free ebook creator software. Great for creating multimedia interactive text books.

Katy Del Castillo's curator insight, September 14, 1:46 PM
very useful