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Rescooped by Marcia Powell from Teacher Leadership Weekly
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How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? | MindShift

How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? | MindShift | Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Using tech tools that students are familiar with and already enjoy using is attractive to educators, but getting students focused on the project at hand might (RT @MindShiftKQED: How does multitasking affect the way kids learn?

Via Peter Skillen, ratzelster
Marcia Powell's insight:

Double-edged sword here.  Kids are tied into the need for community so tightly that anxiety can result if they do not have access to their digital devices.  I make certain that kids are on-task by frequent walk-throughs, and conversations that promote respect among the student and myself.  I also realize that the relevancy of my class becomes paramount, so I encourage the kids to tweet or document moments in the classroom using digital platforms.  Students who do not have cell phones need to be tied in as well, using the laptops I have available, or a Kindle or ipod touch.   All students have access to digital devices and it creates opportunities to talk about appropriate usage.

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Peter Skillen's curator insight, May 3, 2013 10:38 AM

Although this is a very complex issue - and one that is getting a great deal of attention these days - in some ways it is a 'no brainer'.  At the risk of simplifying it, each of us has a certain amount of mental energy to allocate. It saddens me when kids, in particular, "have greater difficulty transferring their learning to new contexts".

 

Instead of 'multitasking' with unused mental effort, I want kids to choose to direct the extra mental effort back into the task itself… evaluating effectiveness, determining better strategies, reflecting on generalizations to other similar, or different, domains.  ‘How am I doing?’ ‘What could I do differently next time?’ ‘How can I kick it up a notch?’ Thus they are reinvesting all your efforts into maximizing performance and generalizable skills.

 

More here in Can Students Multitask?

http://theconstructionzone.wordpress.com/2010/01/21/can-students-multitask/

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Rescooped by Marcia Powell from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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5 Fab #Storytelling Lessons #learning #edchat

5 Fab #Storytelling Lessons #learning #edchat | Ed Tech | Scoop.it

"Storytelling has been one of our defining human characteristic, even before we developed oral languages. Signs, marks on the skin, drawings on the sand, were common ways to communicate achievements, the location of water, or the whereabouts of dangerous enemies waiting to ambush their prey. With time, we have developed sophisticated ways of transforming information into narratives, relaying messages, and conveying images."

 

Read the full article to see examples and find out how to make stories memorable using these 5 storytelling lessons from history:

The Lascaux & Chauvet caves in France - the caveman lesson:   Use familiar images. Pick visuals that your audience can relate to, and pair them with your message. Your audience will understand it and remember it vividly.

Hieroglyphics... Infographics? -  the mummy lesson:  Present your hard data using infographics while threading a compelling story. Combine this with the Caveman Lesson: use familiar images and your audience will understand and relate to your message, and most importantly, remember it.

The Bible, Coran, Talmud, Vedas - the God almighty lesson:  Build narratives around things that you know and use shared and common examples so your audience can relate. Use repetition when you cannot use images and do so in subtle ways, introducing slight variations each time. Then re-write, re-write, and re-write once again…

Aesop's Fables and the moral of the story - the fabulist lesson:  Be concise. Make your story self-explanatory, and don’t give all the answers. Never underestimate your audience’s intelligence: provide value, guide them, and let them come to their own conclusions.

 

Reason & emotion: The stories of William Shakespeare - the bard's lesson:  Plan your story and give it a clear plot with a well defined arc — it will keep your audience engaged. Know your audience and make sure your story uses the right voice, style and language.


Via Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose), Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, December 29, 2014 2:21 PM

Thanks go to fellow curator Kim Zinke ("How to find and tell your story") for finding and sharing this post. Great article recap Kim!


I really like this article because it shows -- despite all the hype about storytelling -- how long we've been successfully telling stories. What I like even more is that the author, Reinaldo Calcano, offers a tip from each example he uses -- a tip that you can use to craft your own biz stories. Yeah!


At the end you will even find something rarer -- a list of real references with hyperlinks. Thank heavens. It's always great to know the sources used in the wild west of the Internet.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Marcia Powell from Teacher Leadership Weekly
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New Handy Chart on The Difference Between Projects and Project-based Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

New Handy Chart on The Difference Between Projects and Project-based Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Ed Tech | Scoop.it

Via Felix Jacomino, Jon Samuelson, ratzelster
Marcia Powell's insight:

This is great, because it talks about the evolution of #pbl, and tells me how I can get better as a teacher.   This should be of particular interest to anyone trying to transform their classroom.

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ratzelster's curator insight, May 21, 2013 2:20 PM

There is a huge push to embrace PBL...this article does a very nice job of defining how project and problem based learning is different.  What are you using in your class?

Jenny Lussier's curator insight, May 21, 2013 9:06 PM

Great comparison!

ratzelster's comment, May 31, 2013 7:46 AM
I sort of think it's an on-going kind of journey. It's hard to get there in one jump. I see it as more of a gradual and intentional shift.
Rescooped by Marcia Powell from Teacher Leadership Weekly
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Commonalities Among the Practices in Science, Mathematics and English


Via Darren Burris, ratzelster
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ratzelster's comment, May 21, 2013 9:23 AM
I believe with all my experience that finding these common threads is the only way to help students find powerful connections between their skill sets and the content we (meaning the community we) need them to know in order to take their place in our society.
Darren Burris's comment, May 21, 2013 12:49 PM
Agreed on all fronts. I also find this provides "stickiness" to concepts and ideas and makes them have staying power or endure with students; it does show the power of knowing content (learning stuff) and the ability to use it. I too have high hopes for the big idea this simple diagram holds!
ratzelster's comment, May 21, 2013 2:19 PM
I think your word "stickiness" is a good one...and one that is familiar in other arenas. It is the way that we'll be able to gain lots of leverage on learning.
Rescooped by Marcia Powell from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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Miles MacFarlane: Understanding and Creating Professional Learning Networks

As part of a self-directed professional learning community, teachers at RMC in London, Ontario undertook the exploration of a range of social media tools. Th...

Via Tricia Marty Rohloff, Dennis T OConnor
Marcia Powell's insight:

Trust, openness, and integrity.  User-developed, rather than top-down.  #pln #learningnetworks

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John Popke's comment, March 2, 2014 8:59 PM
Thanks for sharing this!
John Popke's comment, March 2, 2014 8:59 PM
Thanks for sharing this!
John Popke's comment, March 2, 2014 8:59 PM
Thanks for sharing this!
Rescooped by Marcia Powell from Teacher Leadership Weekly
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How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? | MindShift

How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? | MindShift | Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Using tech tools that students are familiar with and already enjoy using is attractive to educators, but getting students focused on the project at hand might (RT @MindShiftKQED: How does multitasking affect the way kids learn?

Via Peter Skillen, ratzelster
Marcia Powell's insight:

Double-edged sword here.  Kids are tied into the need for community so tightly that anxiety can result if they do not have access to their digital devices.  I make certain that kids are on-task by frequent walk-throughs, and conversations that promote respect among the student and myself.  I also realize that the relevancy of my class becomes paramount, so I encourage the kids to tweet or document moments in the classroom using digital platforms.  Students who do not have cell phones need to be tied in as well, using the laptops I have available, or a Kindle or ipod touch.   All students have access to digital devices and it creates opportunities to talk about appropriate usage.

more...
Peter Skillen's curator insight, May 3, 2013 10:38 AM

Although this is a very complex issue - and one that is getting a great deal of attention these days - in some ways it is a 'no brainer'.  At the risk of simplifying it, each of us has a certain amount of mental energy to allocate. It saddens me when kids, in particular, "have greater difficulty transferring their learning to new contexts".

 

Instead of 'multitasking' with unused mental effort, I want kids to choose to direct the extra mental effort back into the task itself… evaluating effectiveness, determining better strategies, reflecting on generalizations to other similar, or different, domains.  ‘How am I doing?’ ‘What could I do differently next time?’ ‘How can I kick it up a notch?’ Thus they are reinvesting all your efforts into maximizing performance and generalizable skills.

 

More here in Can Students Multitask?

http://theconstructionzone.wordpress.com/2010/01/21/can-students-multitask/

Rescooped by Marcia Powell from Mr. Frerichs's EdTech
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Kodable Teaches Kids To Code Before They Learn To Read

Kodable Teaches Kids To Code Before They Learn To Read | Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Kindergarten is a recommended time for kids to learn a second language. Kodable sees no reason it shouldn't be a computer language.

Via mrfrerichs
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