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Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News
Natural history news and information for animals, plants, and habitats.  See more at http://garryrogers.com.
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End Ecocide in Europe | A European Citizen Initiative to give the Earth Rights

End Ecocide in Europe | A European Citizen Initiative to give the Earth Rights | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it

The pollution and destruction of our environment, as well as the depletion of natural resources are progressing fast and without restraint. Extensive damage or destruction of ecosystems is called ecocide.

All life on earth, our peaceful co-existence and our own well-being depends on intact ecosystems. Nature provides the necessary resources and our natural environment. We should value and protect this generous gift.

That’s why we request that crimes against nature be recognised as crime. We request direct liability for decision-makers in politics and business, as well as companies responsible for ecocide.

Garry Rogers's insight:

Here's a direct approach to industry environmental impact.  Make it ALL a crime!  Sign the petition.

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Gangs raking in thousands from the rising tide of wildlife crime

Gangs raking in thousands from the rising tide of wildlife crime | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
Report reveals the extent of poaching and poisoning and calls for tougher sanctions, writes Tracy McVeigh

"A new report claims the scale of the problem is being hidden and that gangs are making large sums of money from illegal activities such as hare-coursing, raking in up to £10,000 a month in one case, while poaching of fish and deer is common and as likely to happen in urban parks as in the countryside."

Garry Rogers's insight:

Killing and capturing wild animals has a direct effect on a few species.  Roads, houses, and pollution have indirect effects on all species.  The first is intentional, the second is accidental.  Which do you think is the most harmful? 

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Fracking's Unlikely Opponents: German Breweries

Fracking's Unlikely Opponents: German Breweries | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
Brewers say that contaminated groundwater would ruin a centuries-old tradition and industry.

"When the Bavarian Purity Law was first declared in 1487, not a single European had stepped on the land above the Marcellus Shale in the Eastern United States. The First Nations of Canada weren’t fighting natural gas pipelines, because as far as natural resources go, the Alberta tar sands were centuries away from being in the picture—as was the internal combustion engine.

"Yet the law, the Reinheitsgebot, which strictly dictates the ingredients that can be used in making beer, is giving the powerful German brewing industry historic ammunition against the creeping potential for new natural gas exploration.

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Garry Rogers's insight:

In the United States, people have begun recycling their urine.  How can the beer makers complain about using filthy water; the issue has been discussed ever since indoor toilets were invented.

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Endangered Species Condoms

Endangered Species Condoms | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it

The world’s population now numbers more than 7 billion, and we add another 227,000 people to the planet every day. More people means less room for wildlife. The Endangered Species Condoms Project provides people with a unique, engaging way to talk about the connection between human population growth and the extinction crisis.

Garry Rogers's insight:

Sign up to participate in the endangered species program.  The massive human population and its resource use are responsible in our time for the great extinction of plants and animals.  In all our endeavors for wildlife protection, we must never forget that the problems we see are often just symptoms of human overpopulation.

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Ban Cruel Wildlife Traps

Ban Cruel Wildlife Traps | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
Target: Honorable Steve Thomson, Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources
Goal: Ban the use of cruel leghold traps in British Columbia
Leghold traps are cruel devices designed to hold an animal against its will.
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International Tiger Day Poster

International Tiger Day Poster | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
The official International Tiger Day Poster for 2013.
Garry Rogers's insight:

GR:  During the past century, we lost 97% of all wild tigers. Habitat loss and hunting eliminated 97,000 of the 100,000 tigers we had a century ago.  At this rate, all tigers living in the wild will be extinct in 10 years! Celebrate International Tiger Day and encourage others to join in.

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The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program | Environm...

The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program | Environm... | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
Too much acid in the ocean is bad news for sea life. Acid eats away at calcium carbonate, the primary ingredient of shells and skeletons that many ocean animals depend on for survival. The shell pictured here is a victim of this process.
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Invasive Palm Threatens Java Rhino To Extinction

Invasive Palm Threatens Java Rhino To Extinction | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
The last of Indonesia’s critically endangered Javan rhinoceroses have survived poachers, rapid deforestation and life in the shadow of one of the archipelago’s most active volcanoes. But an invasive plant is now posing a new threat to the world’s rarest species of rhino.

Once the most common of the Asian rhinoceroses, the Javan rhino (Rhinoceros sondaicus) started its decline at least 3,000 years ago with the growth of human populations and increased hunting pressures. With its horn fetching $30,000 on the black market, poaching is considered the driver of much of its decline in modern times.

"As few as 58 Javan rhinos exist in the world today, and the species is quite possibly the rarest large mammal on earth. All are found in one small population in Ujung Kulon — a sprawling 1,200-square-kilometer (463-square-mile) national park on the westernmost tip of West Java and the island of Panaitan. In addition the rhinos, the park is home to dozens of other mammals, more than 270 species of birds and 57 rare plant species.

"But a single species of plant is threatening the park’s fragile ecosystem.

“The issue in Ujung Kulon is not deforestation — but an invasive species called the arenga palm,” said Elisabeth Purastuti, WWF’s Ujung Kulon leader.

"Once covered in old-growth forest, the cataclysmic eruption of nearby Krakatoa in 1883 wiped out much of Ujung Kulon’s primary forest cover, creating a patchy network of secondary forest where the rhino thrived."

...

Garry Rogers's insight:

GR:  Conservation biologists have been saying that construction (total habitat elimination) and invasive species are the greatest threat to Earth ecosystems.  Though we now must place climate change in the number two spot, invasive species continue to be one of humanity's greatest destructive achievements.  Read more:

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Hot Arctic Water, High Pressure Domes Pushing Sea Ice Toward New Record Lows

Hot Arctic Water, High Pressure Domes Pushing Sea Ice Toward New Record Lows | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it

It doesn't take much to shove Arctic sea ice toward new record low values these days. Human caused climate change has made it easy for all kinds of weather systems to bully the ice.


In the case of the past seven days, three moderate strength high pressure cells churned away over the central Arctic, bringing with them clear skies, air temperatures in the range of average for 1979-2000 above the 70 North Latitude line, and a clockwise circulation favoring sea ice compaction and warm water upwelling at the ice edge.

The highs measured in the range of 1020 to 1025 hPa barometric pressure. Moderate-strength weather conditions that during a typical year of the last century would have been almost completely non-noteworthy. Today, instead, we have sea ice extent testing new record lows in the Japanese Space Agency’s monitor.

Garry Rogers's insight:

On the chart, the red line for 2014 intersects the 2011 & 2012 as it reaches July. Will it fall below them as the year progresses?

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The Hunt for the Golden Mole review Richard Girling's 'entertaining and provocative' quest

The Hunt for the Golden Mole review  Richard Girling's 'entertaining and provocative' quest | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it

Richard Girling's tale of an elusive burrowing mammal turns into a compelling study of humankind's devastating cruelty to animals. In 1964, in Jowhar, Somalia, zoologist Alberto Simonetta stumbled on a disused bakery oven in which barn owls had made...

Garry Rogers's insight:

The majority of Earth's creatures have not been identified.  The unknown species tend to be the smallest, but some belong to familiar groups.  For example, lepidopterists estimate that only about 10% of moth species have been identified.  Human impacts will extinguish many of them and there will be no evidence, not even a tiny pile of bones, to show that they ever existed.

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Red tide bloom moves in on Florida

Red tide bloom moves in on Florida | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it

"A monstrous red tide bloom, the largest seen in Florida since 2006 is advancing on the state's beaches. It has already killed thousands of fish in the Gulf of Mexico, and officials are now concerned about health risks if it washes ashore."


According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, "Satellite images from the Optical Oceanography Laboratory at the University of South Florida show a patchy bloom up to 60 miles wide and 90 miles long, at least 20 miles offshore between Dixie and northern Pinellas counties in northwest and southwest Florida. This bloom has caused an ongoing fish kill.  FWC’s Fish Kill Hotline has received reports of thousands of dead and moribund benthic reef fish including various snapper and grouper species, hogfish, grunts, crabs, flounder, bull sharks, lionfish, baitfish, eel, sea snakes, tomtates, lizardfish, filefish, octopus, and triggerfish. Water discoloration and respiratory irritation have been reported offshore in the bloom patch. Forecasts by the Collaboration for Prediction of Red Tides show little movement of the surface bloom and slow east/southeast movement of bottom waters, which should keep the bloom offshore within the next few days.

Garry Rogers's insight:

Algae has now fully covered the smallest of my three ponds.  Previous blooms killed all the fish, this one will have to be content with the smaller organisms.  The excess nitrates come from the farm just upstream of my place.

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Ocean News: Mercury Levels Rising in Surface Waters, Penguin Species Threatened by Habitat Degradation, and More

Ocean News: Mercury Levels Rising in Surface Waters, Penguin Species Threatened by Habitat Degradation, and More | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it

"According to a new study, mercury levels in many of the world oceans’ surface waters have tripled due to human activity. Because mercury drains into the ocean from mines, coal-fired plants, and sewage, mercury levels are higher in surface waters compared to the deep ocean. The Guardian.

"A recent study found that all penguin species are threatened by habitat degradation. The scientists found that food scarcity, bycatch, oil pollution, and climate change were the biggest threats to penguins, and that management plans reflect these issues. Phys.org

Garry Rogers's insight:

Almost any nature research discovers deadly human impacts.

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Canadians Can’t Drink Their Water After 1.3 Billion Gallons of Mining Waste Flows into Rivers

Hundreds of people in British Columbia can’t use their water after more than a billion gallons of mining waste spilled into rivers and creeks in the province’s Cariboo region.
A breach in
Garry Rogers's insight:

Such a great waste of the land.  Ecological succession, the natural process of recovery after a landslide or flood can take hundreds of years.  However, the mined landscape looks almost as harsh as a lava flow.  Humans could be long gone by the time nature reclaims the land.  Oh Canada, what have you done?

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Save Reservoir Animals from Intentional Water Drainage

Save Reservoir Animals from Intentional Water Drainage | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
Target: Mayor Percy Bland of Meridian, Mississippi Goal: Relocate fish and other animals that are dying because of the intentional draining of their native reservoir The city of Meridian, Mississippi has slowly begun to drain the water from a...
Garry Rogers's insight:

Fish, amphibians, waterfowl, dragonflies, mammals, and more depend on water.  They all feel pain and fear and deserve better treatment than this.

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Stop South African Mine That Threatens Rhino Sanctuary - The Petition Site

Stop South African Mine That Threatens Rhino Sanctuary  - The Petition Site | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
A proposed mine in South Africa poses serious risks to rhinos, giving poachers easier access to the animals. (79263 signatures on petition)
Garry Rogers's insight:

Add your signature.

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Hundreds of animals disappear as humans multiply

Hundreds of animals disappear as humans multiply | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
As the number of humans on Earth has nearly doubled over the past four decades, the number of bugs, slugs, worms and crustaceans has declined by 45 per cent, say researchers.


Meanwhile, the larger loss of wildlife big and small across the planet may be a key driver of growing violence and unrest, said another study in the journal Science as part of a special series on disappearing animals.


Invertebrates are important to the Earth because they pollinate crops, control pests, filter water and add nutrients to the soil.

The decline of invertebrates is similar to that of land-based vertebrates, according to an analysis of scientific literature by an international team including Ben Collen of University College London.

Among animals with backbones that live on land, 322 species have disappeared in the past five centuries, and the remaining species show about a 25 per cent decline in abundance.

"We were shocked to find similar losses in invertebrates as with larger animals, as we previously thought invertebrates to be more resilient," says Collen.

Garry Rogers's insight:

The numbers are staggering.  Every new bit of research shows it's worse than I thought.  Every bit of good news is so small compared to the bad.  We have to stay engaged--sign the petitions, send the emails, make the calls. 

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Invasive Plants Are Destroying North American Desert Ecosystems

Invasive Plants Are Destroying North American Desert Ecosystems | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it

Introduction to Invasive Plants in Deserts


One or a few species of invasive plants can replace native plant communities across entire landscapes. Biodiversity and stability of vegetation, soils, and wildlife decline dramatically. Once the replacement is complete, it is difficult to restore the original species. In some instances, the replacement is so widespread there are not enough resources available to achieve restoration. The loss is permanent.


Invasive non-native species are a central management concern for all wild land managers because they “threaten biodiversity and other ecological functions and values” (Warner et al. 2003). This statement represents a consensus by the scientists and land managers concerned with natural ecosystems (e.g., Mau-Crimmins et al. 2005). Native vegetation is more diverse, resilient, and persistent than invasive plant vegetation; it provides food and cover for wildlife, absorbs precipitation, increases water storage, protects soil, reduces flooding and sedimentation, and helps maintain air and water quality. According to the Sonoran Institute: “Invasive species are the second most significant threat to biological diversity after direct habitat loss”.

Garry Rogers's insight:

GR:  Invasive species, like storm troopers leading the surging ruin of global warming, are demolishing Earth’s ecosystems.

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Save this critically endangered bird!

Save this critically endangered bird! | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it

Less than 500 are left, but if the government steps up to increase habitat protections we could save them. (23,536 signatures on petition)

Garry Rogers's insight:

This Francolin (Francolinus ochropectus) occupies two small areas in Djibouti in the horn of Africa.  It prefers dense African juniper habitat near the coast of the Gulf of Tadjora in the southern Sea of Aden.  Formerly abundant, the Francolin numbers were first reduced by hunting, and then more recently by destruction of the juniper woodland by livestock grazing and fuel-wood gathering.  Climate change appears to be involved too. 


The Francolin is surviving in the dying juniper woodland and in less suitable neighboring vegetation. Please sign the petition to the Djiboutian Prime Minister to extend protections back over the Forêt du Day and establish captive breeding programs for the Francolin before this rare species disappears forever.

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Don’t Forget Butterflies! Our Pollination Crisis Is About More Than Honeybees

Don’t Forget Butterflies! Our Pollination Crisis Is About More Than Honeybees | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
When the White House signed an order on pollinator health last week, it included all pollinators -- not just honeybees.
Garry Rogers's insight:

Dropping pesticides and interspersing food plants with crops will help pollinators, but there are other things to consider.  Construction, farming, logging, livestock grazing, invasive species, and toxic pollutants (including greenhouse gasses) are eliminating habitat much faster than farmers are recovering it.  Until humans control their population and correct the ways they use resources, pollinators and other species will continue to decline. 

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Climate change: historians will look back and ask 'why didn't they act?'

Climate change: historians will look back and ask 'why didn't they act?' | Garry Rogers Nature Conservation News | Scoop.it
Harvard historian Naomi Oreskes talks about her new book, which imagines that current inertia in the face of climate change will puzzle academics for centuries to come
Garry Rogers's insight:

Academics will be working on the explanation for centuries, but I doubt that the basic human weaknesses that lead to such a catastrophe will be a mystery to them. 


The same title could be applied to other subjects:  Extinction:  'why didn't they act?

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