GarryRogers Biosphere News
20.2K views | +0 today
Follow
GarryRogers Biosphere News
Nature Conservation News and information for animals, plants, and nature.  See more at http://garryrogers.com.
Curated by Garry Rogers
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Inventory of Moths

Inventory of Moths | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
Biodiversity in the Andes: Teaming up international colleagues, an entomologist of Jena University identifies nearly 2,000 geometrid moth species in the South-American Andes The rain forests in the mountains of the tropical Andes are amongst the...
Garry Rogers's insight:
Yes!  We need more work like this.  And we need repeated surveys to show when species are having trouble.
Biologists estimate that only about 10% of all moth species have been identified.  Nighttime pollinators as sensitive to pesticides as their daytime counterparts, the butterflies, these innocent creatures could be going extinct faster than we are finding them.  We, the only species capable of caring for the others, might never know how many moths there were before the current mass extinction.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

About The Great Sunflower Project

About The Great Sunflower Project | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it

People all over the country are collecting data on pollinators in their yards, gardens, schools and parks. Together, we take counts of the number and types of pollinators visiting plants (especially sunflowers). We have been gathering information on pollinator service since 2008, and now have the largest single body of information about bee pollinator service in North America. Thanks to our thousands of observers, we can determine where pollinator service is strong or weak compared to averages.

Why It's Important

Over the past few years, scientific studies have suggested that both honey bee and native bee populations are in trouble. What we don't know is how this is affecting pollination of our gardens, crops and wild lands. In 2008, we started this project as a way to gather information about our urban, suburban and rural bee populations and to give you the tools to learn about what is happening with the pollinators in your yard.

How You Can Help

While we love to get data from our namesake species, Lemon Queen Sunflowers, you can participate by watching a plant and recording how many pollinators visit, or recording pollinators as you take your favorite hike!

Seeds can be purchased at your local store or through Renee's Garden who will donate 25% of her proceeds if you use the coupon code FR225A. Do join us!

We would love to have you; let’s help our most important pollinators together!

Garry Rogers's insight:

GR:  Here's a splendid opportunity to contribute to nature conservation.  Choose a location and make a checklist of the butterflies, bumblebees, and hummingbirds you see.  Report your results to the Great Sunflower Project.  Now you're working.

more...
No comment yet.