GarryRogers Biosp...
Follow
Find tag "biodiversity"
16.7K views | +61 today
GarryRogers Biosphere News
Nature Conservation News and information for animals, plants, and nature.  See more at http://garryrogers.com.
Curated by Garry Rogers
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Vandana Shiva — Biodiversity or GMOs?

Within Vandana Shiva's dedication to defending the natural world is a profound celebration of life. When we allow systems to sustain balance and wholeness, life truly can thrive. Here are...
Garry Rogers's insight:

GR:  This story is about "golden rice" and other GMO crops.  The GMOs contain fewer nutrients, they promote monocultures, and they promote artificial fertilizer and pesticide use.  As explained in this article, GMOs cause disease and biodiversity decline.  Proponents are well-funded and profit motivated.  Opponents lack funding and are made to appear fanatical.  What should we do?  We must ban GMO crops. Please support all forms of opposition to GMOs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Collapse of Avian Biodiversity in the Pacific - MAHB

Collapse of Avian Biodiversity in the Pacific - MAHB | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
We arrived off Ducie Island at dawn on October 12. The rough seas and the air above the low atoll in the Pitcairn group of the South Pacific were alive with birds.

Our last stop was Easter Island, one of the most isolated islands in the world, some 1200 miles east of the Pitcairn group and 2000 miles from South America.  Easter Island is the site of an ecocatastrophe, made famous by Jared Diamond.[4]  All of its native birds are extinct, replaced by a collection of “garbage birds” (ones not sought by bird-watchers), especially the wide-ranging South American Diuca finch pictured here, which flits among the looming stone heads.

The state of the birds on these islands is a harbinger of a catastrophe that looms globally,  
Garry Rogers's insight:

Our leaders could promote nature preservation.  Our college planning departments could recommend zoning and construction changes that would avoid so many animal deaths.  Without leadership and rules, our urban population will remain unconcerned with the fate of wild animals.  Perhaps a few hundred years from now people will have learned to appreciate the species that remain.  For those of us afflicted with biophilia, this is a painful prospect.  Would it be effective to conduct petition campaigns aimed at our planning education and government departments?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Following 'Rim Fire,' what should be done with the trees left behind? | The Rundown | PBS NewsHour

Following 'Rim Fire,' what should be done with the trees left behind? | The Rundown | PBS NewsHour | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
A year after a California wildfire known as the “Rim Fire” burnt through over 250,000 acres of Sierra Nevada forests, environmentalists and loggers are debating what to do with the blackened woodland it left behind. The timber industry believes that chopping … Continue reading →
Garry Rogers's insight:

Logging healthy forests destroys soil microorganisms and reduces forest diversity.  Logging burned forests is even more destructive.  Access roads and equipment movements promote erosion, introduce weeds, damage surviving undergrowth, and crush the new tree seedlings that would replace the original forest.  Logging these fragile environments reduces watershed values and slows recovery.  Only an agency such as the U. S. Forest Service that is controlled by the profit-motivated logging industry would approve logging a burned forest.   

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Hundreds of animals disappear as humans multiply

Hundreds of animals disappear as humans multiply | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
As the number of humans on Earth has nearly doubled over the past four decades, the number of bugs, slugs, worms and crustaceans has declined by 45 per cent, say researchers.


Meanwhile, the larger loss of wildlife big and small across the planet may be a key driver of growing violence and unrest, said another study in the journal Science as part of a special series on disappearing animals.


Invertebrates are important to the Earth because they pollinate crops, control pests, filter water and add nutrients to the soil.

The decline of invertebrates is similar to that of land-based vertebrates, according to an analysis of scientific literature by an international team including Ben Collen of University College London.

Among animals with backbones that live on land, 322 species have disappeared in the past five centuries, and the remaining species show about a 25 per cent decline in abundance.

"We were shocked to find similar losses in invertebrates as with larger animals, as we previously thought invertebrates to be more resilient," says Collen.

Garry Rogers's insight:

The numbers are staggering.  Every new bit of research shows it's worse than I thought.  Every bit of good news is so small compared to the bad.  We have to stay engaged--sign the petitions, send the emails, make the calls. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Global Warming

Global Warming | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
Northern Canada is On Fire, And It's Making Global Warming Worse For the past few weeks, dry and warm weather have fueled large forest fires across Canada's remote Northwest Territories. The extent of those fires is well above average for the year to-date, and is in line with climate trends of more fires burning in the northern reaches of the globe.

Of the 186 wildfires in the Northwest Territories to-date this year, 156 of them are currently burning. That includes the Birch Creek Fire complex, which stretches over 250,000 acres.

The amount of acres burned in the Northwest Territories is six times greater than the 25-year average to-date according to data from the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Center.

Boreal forests like those in the Northwest Ter..
Garry Rogers's insight:

Increasing fire occurrence means that a site is more likely to be burned a second time before the vegetation can recover.  This quickly leads to a reduction in diversity and stability.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Invasive Plants in the Sonoran Desert | Wild Sonora

Invasive Plants in the Sonoran Desert | Wild Sonora | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
Fire-prone invasive plants introduced from Africa and Asia are reducing the intervals between fires below the colonization and recovery capability of desert vegetation.
Garry Rogers's insight:

Invasive species, like storm troopers leading the surging ruin of global warming, are demolishing Earth's ecosystems.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Great biodiversity cartoonists

Great biodiversity cartoonists | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it

Anyone who reads CB.com knows that I like to inject a bit of humour into my (often gloomy) messages. Sniggering, chortling, groaning and outright guffawing are useful ways to deal with the depressing topics conservation scientists examine every day. This is why I started the ‘Cartoon of the Week’ series, and now I have a compendiumof quite a few biodiversity-related cartoons. Cartoons can also serve as wonderfully effective political tools if they manage to encapsulate the preposterousness of bad policies, navel-gazing politicians or Earth-buggering corporate tycoons. A good cartoon can be far more effective at transmitting a deep and complex message to a wide audience than most scientific articles.

Who are these gifted artists that bring together wit, humour and hard environmental truths into something that practically every scientist  wants to include in conference presentations? I am inspired by some of these people, as I’m sure are many of you, so I decided to put together a little list of some of today’s better biodiversity cartoonists.

...

Garry Rogers's insight:

GR:  You will love these cartoons.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Don’t Forget Butterflies! Our Pollination Crisis Is About More Than Honeybees

Don’t Forget Butterflies! Our Pollination Crisis Is About More Than Honeybees | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
When the White House signed an order on pollinator health last week, it included all pollinators -- not just honeybees.
Garry Rogers's insight:

Dropping pesticides and interspersing food plants with crops will help pollinators, but there are other things to consider.  Construction, farming, logging, livestock grazing, invasive species, and toxic pollutants (including greenhouse gasses) are eliminating habitat much faster than farmers are recovering it.  Until humans control their population and correct the ways they use resources, pollinators and other species will continue to decline. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

The Maryland Biodiversity Project: Mobilizing community to build a better picture of local biodiversity

The Maryland Biodiversity Project: Mobilizing community to build a better picture of local biodiversity | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
A few years ago, photographer Bill Hubick generously donated the use of his photos in NCC publications. We recently chatted with him about a new project he is also involved with – the Maryland Biodiversity Project.
Garry Rogers's insight:

GR:  This is essential work that governments and volunteers must carry out across the Earth.  As Hubick says, " We live in a time of unparalleled environmental change. How do we assess impacts if we don't have baseline data? State and federal agencies work tirelessly with limited resources to monitor just our rarest species. We need to monitor changes across the board for many reasons. First, it is far cheaper to manage for a given species when it is declining slightly than to wait until it requires a captive breeding program. Ecosystems are also complex, so trying to understand issues without information about what was present in the area five, 20, or 50 years ago is often impossible."

We truly need Citizen Naturalists biodiversity survey projects in every country, state, county and city.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Vulnerability of biodiversity hotspots to global change

Vulnerability of biodiversity hotspots to global change | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it

 http://t.co/t5iYsfgr7D

Results

Our findings show that hotspots may experience an average loss of 31% of their area under analogue climate, with some hotspots more affected than others (e.g. Polynesia–Micronesia). The greatest climate change was projected in low-latitude hotspots. The hotspots were on average suitable for 17% of the considered invasive species. Hotspots that are mainly islands or groups of islands were disproportionally suitable for a high number of invasive species both currently and in the future. We also showed that hotspots will increase their area of pasture in the future. Finally, combining the three threats, we identified the Atlantic forest, Cape Floristic Region and Polynesia–Micronesia as particularly vulnerable to global changes.

Main conclusions

Given our estimates of hotspot vulnerability to changes, close monitoring is now required to evaluate the biodiversity responses to future changes and to test our projections against observations.

Garry Rogers's insight:

GR:  Invasive species and climate change threaten biodiversity everywhere. Invasive plants have already overrun one of my desert research areas in the central Great Basin Desert.  Invasive species are spreading in other desert areas now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Global Biodiversity Losses May Need to be Stopped with More Drastic Measures - Science World Report

Global Biodiversity Losses May Need to be Stopped with More Drastic Measures - Science World Report | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
Science World Report Global Biodiversity Losses May Need to be Stopped with More Drastic Measures Science World Report The researchers examined the growing role that "conservation translocation," which is the movement and release of plants and...
Garry Rogers's insight:

Scientists roll up your sleeves.   University of Florida:  Require physical strength in those new hires.  Biodiversity needs some real help.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Why We Need to Save Wildlife to Save Ourselves

Why We Need to Save Wildlife to Save Ourselves | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
Midway through the new special issue of Science, about the global loss of wildlife, my heart caught on this idea: We now live with a steady, imperceptible loss “in people’s expectations of what the...
Garry Rogers's insight:

The essence of Aldo Leopold's "Land Ethic" is that human acceptance of the equality of other creatures is essential for the survival of all.

more...
Eben Lenderking's curator insight, July 25, 2014 6:00 AM

Compelling argument for respect for the natural environment.

Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

BLM, Cattle, Wild Horses, and Biodiversity on Western U. S. Ranges

BLM, Cattle, Wild Horses, and Biodiversity on Western U. S. Ranges | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
Are we sacrificing vegetation, soil, and biodiversity in the western U. S. to protect domestic cows?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

Just One Road Can Destroy a Forest

Just One Road Can Destroy a Forest | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
keeping wild areas free of roads is a remarkably cost-efficient way of protecting biodiversity and keeping the planet cool
Garry Rogers's insight:

As roads increase, biodiversity declines, and Earth warms. The "Road-Free" initiative might have lost steam, but you can help.  Go to http://roadfree.org and register to show your support.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Garry Rogers
Scoop.it!

How should "Flathead National Forest 2.0" look? | Conservation

How should "Flathead National Forest 2.0" look? | Conservation | GarryRogers Biosphere News | Scoop.it
Montana's Flathead Forest is one of the most biologically diverse areas of our country, but it needs some work to become more effective for conservation.

"In the northwestern corner of Montana just next to Glacier National Park sits the 2.4 million acre Flathead National Forest. It’s a part of the massive and biodiverse “Crown of the Continent” ecosystem, and is part of a broader collection of protected areas stretching all the way down to Yellowstone. It’s home to more than one thousand native plant species, 70 mammals, and 260 birds. It’s home to iconic American megafauna, like grizzly bears and grey wolves, along with mountain lions, wolverines, lynx, and fishers.

"Starting in the 1930s, concerned citizens and government officials have worked to protect this region, and while it remains mostly unaffected by development, it is starting to suffer the effects of climate change. As glaciers disappear from nearby Glacier National Park, the region will see warmer winters and summers, decreasing snowpack, earlier spring melts, reduced stream flows, and a longer, more severe wildfire season. The animals there will increasingly need more space to roam as their food sources and habitats change with the climate."

more...
No comment yet.