Ecopsychology
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THE END OF OIL, CLIMATE CHANGE , AND THE GREAT TURNING ~ Joanna Macy

THE END OF OIL, CLIMATE CHANGE , AND THE GREAT TURNING ~ Joanna Macy | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

"Once there was a mighty people. They possessed the greatest concentration of economic and military power the world had ever seen. And that vast power of theirs derived from ancient sunlight stored deep in the body of the living Earth. They felt entitled to that black gold--entitled to use it all, leaving none for us who came after. They felt entitled to it even when it lay under other peoples' lands. They felt it was theirs, because they had come to depend upon it in every aspect of their lives-- in food, clothing, shelter, in travel and transportation and communicating with each other. They had lost the ability to imagine any other way of life.

 

"A few voices warned that the black gold would run out and that its end was soon approaching. But those voices were hard to hear. More warnings came: that the burning of the black gold was disrupting the seasons and weather patterns, bringing vast climatic changes in the very metabolism of Earth...

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Ecopsychology
How does Nature affect the Psyche?
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Dreaming as Response: The Global Dream Initiative

Dreaming as Response: The Global Dream Initiative | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
When we are dreaming, what is it in response to? When we are dreaming, what is it in response to? When you work with dreams from an animated point of view, notes Stephen Aizenstat, who pioneered the process of DreamTending, it brings the dream to life. When one comes into a relationship with the image, it allows the image its own innate intelligence, and it can speak to us what it knows Aizenstat founded the Global Dream Initiative™ , whose vision it is to “unite individuals and organizations in listening to the landscapes and creatures of the world as they speak through the images of dream.” The vision of GDI also suggests that “through the intelligence of dreams, we aspire to listen to the voice of the earth and serve as a source of education, orientation, and support for dreamers worldwide.”
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Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Cultivating, Counseling, and Stories from Cameroon

Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Cultivating, Counseling, and Stories from Cameroon | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Cultivating, Counseling, and Stories from Cameroon An Interview with Paul D. Coverdell Fellow and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Courtney McCubbin --- | ---Returned Peace Corps volunteer Courtney McCubbin, now training to be a therapist, is acutely aware of lessons she learned when she was “on the other side” of therapy as a client and in the rainforests of Cameroon. While focusing on agroforestry, she built a farm with a protective fence so she could grow new seedlings for farmers. While in therapy, she worked on creating boundaries and nurturing her psyche. As a therapist or counselor, she is developing the capacity to provide fertile ground so that something new can grow within the psyche of the clients she sees…
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Reclaiming a Sense Wholeness Amidst the Environmental Crisis —An Interview with Dr. Jeff Kiehl

Reclaiming a Sense Wholeness Amidst the Environmental Crisis —An Interview with Dr. Jeff Kiehl | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
Dr. Jeffrey T. Kiehl has been a climate scientist for almost 40 years—but he has a unique take on the challenges we face on the climate front, because he is also a Jungian Analyst, focused on the study of the unconscious. In this short interview for Depth Insights™, Dr. Kiehl speaks with Bonnie Bright about his upcoming daylong workshop, “Reclaiming a Sense Wholeness Amidst the Environmental Crisis," which he’ll deliver at the C.G. Jung Psychology and Spirituality Conference taking place in Santa Fe, NM, June 9-11, 2017 In the conversation, Dr. Kiehl offers an exclusive preview of his workshop by sharing ways we can each reconnect with a sense of the numinous and with nature in our daily lives, and the benefits that process can provide. We also discuss the unique, experiential format for this exciting Jungian conference. (Click title for more) WATCH the INTERVIEW HERE (mins)
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Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Stories from Jamaica

Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Stories from Jamaica | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Stories from Jamaica An Interview with Paul D. Coverdell Fellow and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Ross Dionne. The first night Ross Dionne and his wife spent with their host family in Jamaica, they were served chicken foot soup, he remembers with a laugh—probably on purpose so the family could see their reaction. Making the effort to try the food was one of the best things they could do to build connections with people—something Dionne appreciated very much over the course of the two years he spent in the Peace Corps. Now pursuing a Ph.D. In Depth Psychology with a specialization in Community, Liberation and Ecopsychology, he's thrilled to be in a field that looks at the psychological well-being of individuals in relationship with the health of communities, environments, and cultures. It not only gives us the context of what our role is in the world, it also provides a lens through which we can begin to question not only our individual role in certain events, but also the role of our country and of the culture we were born into.
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The Buried, Secret Lives Of Trees

The Buried, Secret Lives Of Trees | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
We know from our language that the body is deeply engaged in our understanding of the world.  A joke is side-splitting.  We get butterflies in our stomach.  Our eyes pop with surprise.  Our blood runs cold.  But my guest today says humans have radically retreated from the wisdom of the body’s signals to a hegemony of the brain, the intellect.  In many ways, sitting at keyboards and screens, we’ve abandoned, forgotten the embodied cognition in the work of hands and backs.  Time to get it back, he says.  This hour On Point: When the brain is not enough. Intelligence in the flesh. --Tom Ashbrook 
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Confronting Signs of a Society in Decline

Confronting Signs of a Society in Decline | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
As a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, Chris Hedges carries with him nearly two decades of experience reporting from war-torn countries like Yugoslavia, El Salvador, and also Gaza and South Sudan. In this capacity, he has witnessed the decline and disintegration of multiple societies, a perspective which has surely influenced his capacity regard the decline and potential destruction of our own modern culture that seems severely out of order. There is a psychological mechanism by which people seek to blind themselves... (Click title for more)
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Nature Has A Formula That Tells Us When It's Time To Die

Nature Has A Formula That Tells Us When It's Time To Die | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
What if I told you that there's a mathematical formula buried deep in living things that tells us — all of us, dandelions, gorillas, sea grasses, elm trees, buttercups — when it's time to die. Scientists think there is such rule.
Bonnie Bright's insight:

Intriguing excerpt: Life is short for small creatures, longer in big ones. So algae die sooner than oak trees; elephants live longer than mayflies, but you know that. Here's the surprise: There is a mathematical formula which says if you tell me how big something is, I can tell you — with some variation, but not a lot — how long it will live. This doesn't apply to individuals, only to groups, to species....

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DroughtAction: Call for Submissions-Art, Poetry, Essays, Video on the Theme of "Drought"

DroughtAction: Call for Submissions-Art, Poetry, Essays, Video on the Theme of "Drought" | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

Call for Submissions: Art, Poetry, Essays, video or other modality for a free public 2-Day webinar and online showcase focused on exploring the theme of “Drought” to help us make meaning of this archetypal (and literal) condition.

Deadline: September 6, 2015

 

Submit your art, poetry, essay or other contribution by September 6. All submissions will be featured online; some contributors will be invited to present or discuss your work during free community webinars/roundtables on September 22 and 23. When submitting, please designate the category your contribution best falls under: Science, Business, Politics or Spirit.... Join us! (CLICK TITLE ABOVE for more details)

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C.G. Jung: “I have again and again been faced with the mystery of love and have never been able to explain what it is.”

C.G. Jung: “I have again and again been faced with the mystery of love and have never been able to explain what it is.” | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

Carl Jung speaks of love:

 

“In classical times, when such things were properly understood, Eros was considered a god whose divinity transcended our human limits, and who therefore could be neither comprehended nor represented in any way.


I might, as many before me have attempted to do, venture an approach to this daimon, whose range of activity extends from the endless spaces of the heavens to the dark abysses of hell; but I falter before the task of finding the language which might adequately express the incalculable paradoxes of love.


Eros is a kosmogonos, a creator and father-mother of all higher consciousness. I sometimes feel that Paul’s words—“Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not love”—might be the first condition of all cognition and the quintessence of divinity itself. Whatever the learned interpretation of the sentence “God is love,” the words affirm the ... (Click title to read more)

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Biophilia: The New Plant-Based Way To Stay Healthy

Biophilia: The New Plant-Based Way To Stay Healthy | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

We now spend an average of 90 percent of our time living and working in sealed-off, air-tight, toxic, manmade environments....

 

Plants make us feel good. In fact, other elements of the natural world do also. Why is that?

In a word, it's "biophilia." A term coined by social psychologist Erich Fromm in the 1960s, biophilia is our biologically-inherited need to commune with nature. Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson, in his book Biophilia defines it as "the connections that human beings subconsciously seek with the rest of life." In his biophilia hypothesis, Wilson has urged that these connections are imperative for healthy emotional development and wellbeing.⊃1;

When I first heard about biophilia... it really resonated with me. I had recently learned about Nature Deficit Disorder (NDD)⊃2; an unofficial behavioral disorder that stems from the "disconnect" our children have with the natural world. Biophilia certainly explained the challenge of NDD and why it has a profound impact on our future.

As a species, humans evolved over millions of years amid natural surroundings. Our physical, mental, emotional and spiritual... (Click title for more)

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Why the environmental movement failed (and how it might succeed ...

Why the environmental movement failed (and how it might succeed ... | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

What is denial and what triggers it? Ecospychologist Sandra White characterized denial as a psychological defense mechanism against information we cannot cope with acknowledging – the way in which our subconscious protects us from facing the unfaceable. In the context of climate change “the unfaceable” might be the acknowledgement that our current collective behaviors are exterminating much of life on Earth and preventing the possibility of a decent existence for future generations.

 

This conflicts with our cherished belief “I am a good person” and so the mechanism of denial kicks in – we deny the reality, or even the possibility, of dangerous climate change due to human actions.

This notion of “I am a good person” is worth exploring more explicitly.

 

The current behaviors and aspirations our culture sanctifies and normalises as “good” (those same ones ruining everything for current and future generations…) are intimately bound up with our sense of individual identity. Success is equated with the acquisition of material possessions and... (Click title for more

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

Welcome to the Anthropocene | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

When I was a boy, we lived in the Holocene. That’s what the geologists called it, anyway, from the Greek words for  “entirely new.” The term was settled on in 1885 and defined as the geological epoch that followed the end of the Pleistocene about 12,000 years ago, after the retreat of the ice from the northern hemisphere, as the planet entered one of its periodic interglacial periods.  The Holocene, a relatively mild, even balmy, period, saw the rise of human civilization—indeed, all of recorded human history.  Bet we’ll miss it when it’s gone.

 

Almost two centuries after the beginning of the industrial revolution in Europe, an ecologist named Eugene F. Stoermer coined the word “anthropocene” to refer to the evidence of the human impact on the planet, an impact he judged to be on par with the great geological events of the past. The word means the “human new.” He started using the word in the early 1980s, but it didn’t catch on until 2000, when he and Paul Crutzen used the word in print for the first time.  While not officially adopted... (click title for more)

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Study: Global warming worsening watery dead zones

Study: Global warming worsening watery dead zones | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

Global warming is likely playing a bigger role than previously thought in dead zones in oceans, lakes and rivers around the world and it's only going to get worse, according to a new study.

 

Dead zones occur when fertilizer runoff clogs waterways with nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorous. That leads to an explosion of microbes that consumes oxygen and leaves the water depleted of oxygen, harming marine life.

 

Scientists have long known that warmer water increases this problem, but a new study Monday in the journal Global Change Biology by Smithsonian Institution researchers found about two dozen different ways — biologically, chemically and physically — that climate change worsens the oxygen depletion... (Click title for more)

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Dreaming as Response: The Global Dream Initiative

Dreaming as Response: The Global Dream Initiative | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
When we are dreaming, what is it in response to? Dream Tending and the Global Dream Initiative with Dr. Steve Aizenstat.
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Ancestral Soul Work: A Conversation with Sandra Easter, PhD

Ancestral Soul Work: A Conversation with Sandra Easter, PhD | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
In this interview, Sandra Easter, Ph.D., author of Jung and the Ancestors: Beyond Biography, Mending the Ancestral Web, speaks movingly about how developing a relationship with our ancestors and ancestral past can help us heal, both individually and collectively.
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Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Stories from Guinea

Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Stories from Guinea | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

An Interview with Paul D. Coverdell Fellow and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Hilary Braseth


When the Ebola virus broke out in Guinea, West Africa, with Patient Zero, a 4-year-old boy, who came down with the disease, Peace Corps volunteer Hilary Braseth was forced to return to the U.S. after three years of service. 


Once she landed in the very fast-paced, high-tech San Francisco Bay Area, though, it was a rough transition. She didn’t believe she could find a place in U.S. society that would allow her the space or the breathing room to integrate the “very real changes that occurred in the Peace Corps” with her new life in the U.S. More, she suspects many returned volunteers struggle to find meaning and to decide “what’s next.” 


After having just spent so much time serving in a foreign country and making deep, lasting friendships with people so different from one’s self, how do you assimilate back to the “grind” of daily U.S. living, she wondered. Then, something magical happened…  (Click the title to read the full article or listen to the audio interview)

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Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Stories from Niger—Discussions in Depth Psychology

Peace Corps Meets Pacifica: Stories from Niger—Discussions in Depth Psychology | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

Stephanie Steiner, a returned Peace Corps volunteer who served in Niger, has many significant memories. At one point, early in her service, she recalls, a woman approached her to ask if she could help the village farmers get some peanuts to plant for the upcoming growing season. As the Peace Corps volunteers were discouraged from giving handouts in lieu of developing sustainable practices that could be duplicated in the future, Steiner initially shrugged off the request. Then she remembered Peace Corps had a gender and development fund for projects involving women and gender equality and education for girls, etc. 


Steiner met with people managing the fund in the city and together, in collaboration with women from the village, they came up with the idea of a peanut savings and loan bank. Any woman could take one or two bowls of peanuts from a starter source provided by an initial grant, but when that woman harvested at the end of the season, she paid back double what she initially borrowed. In this way, the bank could grow exponentially and provide an ongoing stable supply of peanuts for future growing seasons. In addition, each woman paid a small sum of money to join the group, which allowed them to receive training from NGO, Care International, on using micro-credit.

Listening to Steiner’s story, I’m struck by the resilience, creativity and resourcefulness that can arise when people—any of us—are given a break, and also by the generosity of individuals like Stephanie and other Peace Corps volunteers who are doing this kind of work. I’m reminded of a quote from Jung, who stated that anyone who wants to know the human psyche should “put away his scholar’s gown” and “wander with human heart through the world.”...(Click title for full article and to listen to the audio interview)

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Dreaming the Earth: Earthing the Dream—Depth Psychology and Appreciative Nature Practices with Dr. Pat Katsky

Dreaming the Earth: Earthing the Dream—Depth Psychology and Appreciative Nature Practices with Dr. Pat Katsky | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
How can we use appreciative nature practices to reconnect with the earth and the images from our dreams asking us to step out into nature?
Bonnie Bright's insight:
Dr. Pat Katsky is a Jungian Analyst and core faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute, and she has been a therapist for thirty years. When Pat sat down with me in a recent interview, our conversation focused on the idea that some of the most psychologically healing experiences come from the natural world, a theme derived from an upcoming certificate program, “Dreaming the Earth: Earthing the Dream”
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How Trees Calm Us Down - The New Yorker

How Trees Calm Us Down - The New Yorker | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

How a leafy sidewalk or a forest scene can make us feel richer, younger, and more focussed.

 

What is most interesting about this data...is one of its subtler details. The health benefits stem almost entirely from trees planted along streets and in front yards, where many people walk past them; trees in back yards and parks don’t seem to matter as much in the analysis. It could be that roadside trees have a bigger impact on air quality along sidewalks, or that leafy avenues encourage people to walk more. But Berman is also interested in a possibility that harks back to Ulrich’s hospital-window finding: perhaps it is enough simply to look at a tree.

 

In the late nineteenth century, the pioneering psychologist and philosopher William James proposed a distinction between “voluntary” and “involuntary” attention. When you cross a busy intersection or pore over a spreadsheet, you are depleting finite reserves of voluntary, directed attention. The antidote is not, as one might first guess, to sit quietly in a darkened room. “The environment has to have some kind of stimulation to activate your involuntary attention—your fascination".... (CLICK TITLE for more) 

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An additional ten trees on a given block corresponded to a one-per-cent increase in how healthy nearby residents felt...

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Sharing Grief Across Species Lines

Sharing Grief Across Species Lines | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
Anthropologist Barbara J. King explores how she found her own grief eased after the death of her mother by helping a traumatized cat that had lost its human and animal families.
Bonnie Bright's insight:

Beautiful post on just how real the shared field between species is...especially when it comes to grief. We are not in this alone...nor are animals merely victims of human narcissism in the way we treat the planet. They share our plight--and our despair--but perhaps together we can heal each other.

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Trauma and Homecoming: Finding a Sense of Place in the Space of Trauma -- by Bonnie Bright

Trauma and Homecoming: Finding a Sense of Place in the Space of Trauma -- by Bonnie Bright | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

In the heart of the jungle in Columbia, the U’wa people live a simple existence mostly beyond the reaches of modern society, having had little contact at all with the outside world until a few decades ago. Their indigenous relationship to the earth sustains them in a collective role as caretakers of the earth and an equal facet of nature. Thus, when the prospect of international firms making plans to drill into their ancestral lands for oil in the late 1990s arose, they perceived the concept to be intolerable, apocalyptic even (“U’wa tribe’s suicide pact,” n.d.).

 

The tribe of 5,000 people made it known that even the act of searching for oil on their homelands would destroy their way of life, initiating the same kind of colonization, exploitation, destruction, and violence that has happened elsewhere.... 

 

On receiving the news that exploration, and ultimately drilling, would imminently occur on their lands, the leaders promptly announced that the entire tribe of some 5,000 men, women, and children would willingly step off a 1400-foot cliff rather than suffer the horrors sure to follow the drilling. (Click the title to read the full article)

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Why Is It Taking So Long for Psychology to Go Green?

Why Is It Taking So Long for Psychology to Go Green? | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

Psychology also mostly ignores humanity's psychologically-dysfunctional relationship with nature that results in the ecodical behavior that is causing global catastrophe. In spite of abundant scientific information about the shocking effects of human actions on planetary ecosystems (our own life-support systems and the life-support systems of countless other life forms!), few psychologists concern themselves with the task of helping us understand or change that behavior.

But as Ralph Metzner reminded us in 1999, "It is in the hearts and minds of human beings that the causes and cures of the ecocatastrophe are to be found." Surely finding this cure is a task that psychologists and other mental health professionals are morally obliged to urgently undertake given our present circumstances?.... (Click title for more)

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The Best Nature Books of 2014 | The Guardian

The Best Nature Books of 2014 | The Guardian | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

Today, I share a list of what I consider to be the best nature books of the year, hoping that you’ll find lots of interesting and unusual ideas!

 

Yesterday, when I was tearing through my bookshelves hoping to discover books to include on my Best Bird Books of 2014 list, I ran across a number of wonderful nature books that I had to share with you, too. In retrospect, it is interesting to note that I had a much more difficult time choosing these titles because nature literature is a broader and more-difficult-to-define genre than is, say, bird literature, and also because I have a more complete library of nature writing from 2013 than from 2014.....

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The Change Within: The Obstacles We Face Are Not Just External ~Naomi Klein

The Change Within: The Obstacles We Face Are Not Just External ~Naomi Klein | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it
The climate crisis has such bad timing, confronting it not only requires a new economy but a new way of thinking.

 

› Climate change is place-based, and we are everywhere at once. The problem is not just that we are moving too quickly. It is also that the terrain on which the changes are taking place is intensely local: an early blooming of a particular flower, an unusually thin layer of ice on a lake, the late arrival of a migratory bird. Noticing those kinds of subtle changes requires an intimate connection to a specific ecosystem. That kind of communion happens only when we know a place deeply, not just as scenery but also as sustenance, and when local knowledge is passed on with a sense of sacred trust from one generation to the next... (Click title for more)

 

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Bolt from the blue: Warming climate may fuel more lightning

Bolt from the blue: Warming climate may fuel more lightning | Ecopsychology | Scoop.it

Rising global temperatures may cause a big jolt in the number of lightning strikes in the United States over the rest of the 21st century in the latest example of extreme weather spawned by climate change, scientists say.

 

Researchers forecast on Thursday that lightning strikes will increase by about 50 percent by 2100 in the continental United States because thunderstorms will become more explosive in the coming decades thanks to a warming planet.

 

This increase could lead to more wildfires because lightning already triggers half of these blazes in the United States... (Click title for more)

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