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Interesting articles on marketing.
Curated by Alessandro Rea
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Google+ Custom URLs: This Week in Social Media

Google+ Custom URLs: This Week in Social Media | Marketing_me | Scoop.it
Welcome to our weekly edition of what’s hot in social media news. To help you stay up to date with social media, here are some of the news items that caught our attention. What’s New This Week?
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Yahoo wants to buy Tumblr. Will Facebook swoop in at the last minute?

Yahoo wants to buy Tumblr. Will Facebook swoop in at the last minute? | Marketing_me | Scoop.it
Yahoo wants to buy Tumblr. We hear Facebook might spoil the party. But the question is: is Tumblr the fountain of youth that Yahoo badly needs or will this be case of a pathetic old-middle aged guy hanging with youngsters trying to be hip.

Via Michael Q Todd
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Brands Need a Wake-Up Call on Google Plus | Digiday

Brands Need a Wake-Up Call on Google Plus | Digiday | Marketing_me | Scoop.it
Greg Boser is the president of BlueGlass Interactive, a digital marketing agency and software provider. Follow him on Twitter @GregBoser. If you are one of the people who have proclaimed Google Plus a failure, you could be ...

Via Manlio Mannozzi
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Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown

Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown | Marketing_me | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, July 4, 2013 7:19 AM


Marco Arment the creator of Instapaper, has an excellent and provocative piece on why Google is closing down all of its RSS appendages (they just closed also the RSS feeds in Google Alerts) and the logic behind this strategy.


He writes: "Officially, Google killed Reader because “over the years usage has declined”.1 I believe that statement, especially if API clients weren’t considered “usage”, but I don’t believe that’s the entire reason.

The most common assumption I’ve seen others cite is that “Google couldn’t figure out how to monetize Reader,” or other variants about direct profitability. I don’t believe this, either. Google Reader’s operational costs likely paled in comparison to many of their other projects that don’t bring in major revenue, and I’ve heard from multiple sources that it effectively had a staff of zero for years. It was just running, quietly serving a vital role for a lot of people."


"The bigger problem is that they’ve abandoned interoperability. RSS, semantic markup, microformats, and open APIs all enable interoperability, but the big players don’t want that — they want to lock you in, shut out competitors, and make a service so proprietary that even if you could get your data out, it would be either useless (no alternatives to import into) or cripplingly lonely (empty social networks).


Google resisted this trend admirably for a long time and was very geek- and standards-friendly, but not since Facebook got huge enough to effectively redefine the internet and refocus Google’s plans to be all-Google+, all the time.4"


Provides better perspective on RSS, Google, FB and Twitter and your future relationship with RSS.



Must-read article. 9/10


Full article: http://www.marco.org/2013/07/03/lockdown


(Image credit - RSS logo - Shutterstock)



Ashish Rishi's curator insight, July 4, 2013 11:49 PM

Love you Marco!!!  Agreed  and couldn't have asked for more. Internet to me was the ultimate democratization tool , a leveler, a ground playing field that challenged all institutions that had unnecessary walls around them - say educational institutions , you loved them, but they were for a fortunate few. Internet platforms  ( including google) were formed for the love of internet, they have milked it enough and why not ? but now these guys are trying to become to old school walled gardens, I just hope that in doing so , they don't lose the charm that defines them.

Laura Brown's comment, July 6, 2013 2:43 PM
This is like the AOL model of the Internet which they offered years ago. People thought they were online but they were only online via AOL which mean AOL controlled what they say, how they saw it, etc. Many people were fine with the AOL version of the Internet. People who just wanted to look at email and use chat forums for personal reason and put up a personal home page, etc. However, the people who did not like being restricted or confined choose to opt out of AOL and use other ISP's (Internet Service Providers). I'm not surprised Google wants to take several steps back and go that way, take control of what people are allowed to see and make sure the ads are featured versus having the option to block them. They have already gone several steps backwards in bringing back pop up ads. No one seems to protest those, or the video and other bulky ads which take up a lot of bandwidth. People had a large voice against all that when it was still the artists, scientists and other geeks who ruled online. Now it is the marketers and the Internet reflects the change in a big way. It's like one big ad soup. Google just wants to tie it all up in a neat bundle.
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How To Build a Competitive Business Model on the Footprints of Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple

How To Build a Competitive Business Model on the Footprints of Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple | Marketing_me | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Tom Hood's curator insight, February 22, 10:44 AM

is your next business model a platform?


This great blog post captured by curator Robin Good talks about platforms and the gang of four (Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook). 

 

"Today’s dizzying pace of change shows no signs of abating. If anything, it is likely to accelerate. So do everything you can to heed these lessons today, to be as prepared as possible for a vastly different tomorrow."


The ten lessons identified remind me also of the work of Rita McGrath (End of Competitive Advantage) who talks about six key areas in what she calls "The New Strategy Playbook":


1. Continuous Reconfiguration
2. Healthy Disengagement
3. Deft Resource Allocation
4. Innovation Proficiency
5. Discovery Driven Mindset
6. Entrepreneurial Career Management


and also the book, The Power of Pull...

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Google's Plan to Snatch Shopping from Amazon Is Working | Wired Business | Wired.com

Google's Plan to Snatch Shopping from Amazon Is Working | Wired Business | Wired.com | Marketing_me | Scoop.it
Of all the great match-ups among tech's Fantastic Four -- Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon -- it's Google versus Amazon that's becoming the most fascinating, and not because of who has the better tablet.
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