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Novo Citrus no jornal O Globo « OrganicsNet

Novo Citrus no jornal O Globo « OrganicsNet | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
As geleias têm alto teor de frutas orgânicas, calda de agave orgânica, adoçante 100% natural e com baixo índice glicêmico, e pectina natural de frutas cítricas. Esses produtos não contém glúten, conservantes, corantes nem aromatizantes.
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Marca brasileira confecciona peças de algodão 100% orgânico - Terra Brasil

Marca brasileira confecciona peças de algodão 100% orgânico - Terra Brasil | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
Marca brasileira confecciona peças de algodão 100% orgânicoTerra BrasilDesde o plantio, até o produto final, todas as etapas são acompanhadas por profissionais qualificados para garantir os padrões determinados pelo Instituto Bio Dinâmico (IBD) e...
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As vantagens dos produtos orgânicos - Blog da Loja do Jardim

As vantagens dos produtos orgânicos - Blog da Loja do Jardim | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
As vantagens dos produtos orgânicos. Um estudo recente ... Isso é bastante plausível porque o vegetal sem agrotóxicos precisa acionar seu mecanismo natural de defesa o tempo inteiro para se proteger de seus inimigos.
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Alimentos orgânicos vs. tradicionais «

Alimentos orgânicos vs. tradicionais « | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
Isso é bastante plausível porque o vegetal sem agrotóxicos precisa acionar seu mecanismo natural de defesa o tempo inteiro para se proteger de seus inimigos. Esse processo, por sua vez, estimula a fabricação dos ...
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Jenny's blog on knitting: New needles and New yarn!

Jenny's blog on knitting: New needles and New yarn! | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
On the first day when me and my co-worker Sanna were taking a walk during lunch, I remembered that the very popular yarn store Yll&Tyll is located in Uppsala, so I called my husband and asked him to find out where it was.

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Flax and Fleecers Spinning Guild celebrates the fiber arts - News-Sentinel.com

Flax and Fleecers Spinning Guild celebrates the fiber arts - News-Sentinel.com | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it

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The New Danger In Your Meat

The New Danger In Your Meat | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it

SE voce não estiver consumindo carne organica voce está ingerindo antibióticos em todos os alimentos como carne de peru e de suinos assim como nos sanduiches. 


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The Farm Life Draws Some Students for Post-Graduate Work

The Farm Life Draws Some Students for Post-Graduate Work | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
The last Agricultural Census in 2007 showed a 4 percent increase in the number of farms, the first increase since 1920, and some college graduates are joining in the return to the land.

 

 

 

RED HOOK, N.Y. — It was harvest time, and several farm hands were hunched over a bed of sweet potatoes under the midday sun, elbow deep in soil for $10 an hour. But they were not typical laborers.

Jeff Arnold, 28, who has learned how to expertly maneuver a tractor, graduated from Colorado State University. Abe Bobman, 24, who studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, was clearing vines alongside Nate Krauss-Malett, 25, who went to Skidmore College.

Mr. Krauss-Malett said he became interested in farming after working in a restaurant and seeing how much food was wasted. Mr. Bobman had the same realization working in the produce section at a grocery store before college.

They had been in the fields here at Hearty Roots Community Farm in the Hudson Valley since 7 a.m. They all said they could not imagine doing any other job.

“Farming appeals to me, and probably to other people, because it’s simple and straightforward work outdoors with literal fruits from your labor,” Mr. Bobman said. “It doesn’t feel like you’re a part of an oppressive institution.”

For decades, the number of farmers has been shrinking as a share of the population, and agriculture has often been seen as a backbreaking profession with little prestige. But the last Agricultural Census in 2007 showed a 4 percent increase in the number of farms, the first increase since 1920, and some college graduates are joining in the return to the land.

Jordan Schmidt, a crew manager here at Hearty Roots, studied environmental science at Wesleyan. Ms. Schmidt, 27, did not have so much as a garden growing up, but in college, she said, she worked at a student-run farm and fell in love with agriculture. So she gave up on research science and moved onto a farm in Pennsylvania after graduating. This is her third season at Hearty Roots.

Hearty Roots, about 100 miles north of New York City, spans 70 acres with a clear view of the Catskill Mountains to the west. At the height of the harvest this year, the farm produced 8,000 pounds of vegetables a week — including peppers, beets and kale — and employed 10 workers. None of them came from farming backgrounds and most had heard about the job through word of mouth.

Ms. Schmidt recalled that her first time working on a farm, she loaded thousands of onions into a greenhouse to dry out, which was supposed to improve their flavor. But the roof was left uncovered, and when she returned the next day, many of the onions had been spoiled by the sun.

“They were caramelized,” she explained, lowering her eyes. Even with experience, she said, she still makes mistakes. Last year, she left a batch of sweet potatoes outside overnight, and they froze.

Still, she is experienced enough now to command a small group of farmers at Hearty Roots. It took some time, though, for her parents to come to terms with her profession.

“They’re like: ‘Can you make it like that? Can you make it and have kids?’ ” she said. But they have slowly come around, and now, Ms. Schmidt said, her mother is an organic food activist among her friends. (Her brother wants to be a writer.)

Hiring college students for the farm can have drawbacks.

“Most of the people here who work for me are here for one season and then move on to other farms, and so that’s actually the biggest challenge,” said Ben Shute, who owns Hearty Roots with his wife, Lindsey. “Every year it’s like training new people.”

But he said it was worth having such a staff.

“A lot of these people are like ambitious young people who want to farm for themselves,” Mr. Shute said, so they are motivated to learn quickly.

On the East End of Long Island, Sean Frazier, 23, and four others, all recent college graduates in their mid-20s, work on Quail Hill farm in Amagansett and have become close friends. Mr. Frazier, a Princeton graduate who until his senior year wanted to get a Ph.D. in physics, said his father wished that he was doing “something more intellectual, or something that’s harder.”

“He thinks I should be using my math skills,” Mr. Frazier said.

Like the workers in the Hudson Valley, the ones in Amagansett have had their share of misadventures. Mr. Frazier recalled that the first time he tried to collect eggs from under a chicken, he was pecked on his hands, surprisingly hard, and promptly switched (though briefly) to a feet-first technique.

Asked if he felt he was missing out on the city lifestyle, Mr. Frazier reflected for a moment. “I much more feel the opposite,” he said. “It would just really bother me to feel like I was inside all day and I was just missing out on everything that happened.”

The federal Agriculture Department said it did not have statistics on the number of college graduates who have become farmers in recent years, but Kathleen A. Merrigan, the deputy agriculture secretary, said in an interview that she believed the profession was becoming more attractive.

“I always joke that in the old days I used to go to a party and people would say, ‘What do you do for work,’ and I would say, ‘I work in agriculture,’ and I’d be left in the corner somewhere with my gin and tonic,” Ms. Merrigan said. “Now I say I work in agriculture and I’m the belle of the ball.”

In interviews at the two farms, the workers said that for them, farming was not a fad.

“I definitely want to end up living on my own farm — that’s definitely my life goal,” said Calvin Kyrkostas, Mr. Frazier’s co-worker, who graduated with a history degree from Oberlin College in Ohio.

Mr. Kyrkostas, 25, said he got into agriculture after working on a Missouri farm one summer in college. He said he became addicted to the feeling of accomplishment that came with seeing — and eating — the fruits of his labor after 15-hour workdays.

And then there was the tractor.

“I’m from Long Island, you know, I’m not a country boy, so it was cool to be able to hop on a John Deere,” he said. “It’s like every little boy’s dream to drive a tractor.”

“You don’t get into farming for the money,” he said. “You do it for the love of the game.”


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Water exec ventures into organic farming

Water exec ventures into organic farming | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it

 

A HIGH-RANKING official of a water business firm has found “big opportunities” in agribusiness.

Three years after he retired from being chairman of Mactan Rock Industries Inc., a job he held for 38 years, Antonio Tompar is now venturing into integrated organic farming.

 

“I ventured into farming for, one, health reasons and, two, because this is a good industry that needs professionalism and good management. If handled well you can make money out of farming,” Tompar said in an interview.

Tompar said his family owns vast tracts of land in Cebu, Bohol and Iloilo, which he is currently developing into an integrated organic farm to supply organic vegetable to hotels and restaurants in Central Visayas.

He first developed the family’s 12-hectare property in Corella, Bohol. After a year, he developed the 30-hectare land in Asturias, Cebu and later a seven-hectare farm in Dumangas, Iloilo.

Excluding the land cost, Tompar said he invested about P2 million in the first three years just to get his farm operating, which includes purchase of planting materials and seedlings.

Prior to venturing into organic farming, Tompar consulted various industry experts. He attended a three-day session on organic farming in Bansalan, Davao del Sur to have first-hand knowledge in farm planting and management. He also joined the training sessions on organic farming initiated by the Cebu Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

He said he hopes to become a major supplier of organic vegetables in supermarkets in Bohol; and hotels and restaurants in Cebu and Iloilo.

Tompar’s farms currently specialize in organic lettuce planting which he said is “purely organic and can be eaten right away.” His farm adopted the vermiculture technology in sustaining the growth of his organic farms.

Vermiculture uses worms to turn waste into organic fertilizer.

Tompar’s average weekly harvest of lettuce in Bohol and Cebu is 100 kilos each and 50 kilos in Iloilo. He said revenues he collected from selling the lettuce through his dealers are given back as payroll for his employees.

Aside from planting vegetables, Tompar also allotted areas to plant coconut and native banana and introduce “inter-cropping” of coffee and cacao.

He said the pigs he raises in his farm in Bohol help support crop production because of their manire. These pigs are also roasted and served to customers in his 50-seater restaurant Tompar’s Farm Corella STK Grill.

He said any investment in agriculture will prosper given the huge demand for organic fruits and vegetables in the market.

“This is one industry that has a lot of potential but is largely untapped,” Tompar said.

“The promotion of organic farming in the country needs a lot of improvement for all farmers to feel that the demand in the market is increasing so farmers will opt to stay in agriculture and shift to organic farming,” he added.Tompar said the growing global trend of a healthy lifestyle increased the demand for organic products in the market.

 

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/cebu/business/2012/10/01/water-exec-ventures-organic-farming-245719


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The 8 Most Interesting Ideas to Revolutionize Urban Farms

The 8 Most Interesting Ideas to Revolutionize Urban Farms | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
These vertical spaces could change how we grow.

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Biologia Natural: Orgânicos vs. tradicionais

Biologia Natural: Orgânicos vs. tradicionais | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
Depois de revisar nada menos do que 237 pesquisas, estudiosos da Universidade Stanford, nos Estados Unidos, concluíram que desembolsar uma grana extra para ter alimentos orgânicos na despensa pode não valer a ...
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Vinho: produção orgânica quer promover saúde e qualidade

Vinho: produção orgânica quer promover saúde e qualidade | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
Vinho: produção orgânica quer promover saúde e qualidade ... "Nessa atividade, o natural e o sustentável estão em favor da qualidade", diz o enólogo e proprietário da vinícola Família Zuccardi, José Alberto Zuccardi.
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Sou Ecológico - Muito Mais Eco: Gestão Ambiental em Posto de ...

Sou Ecológico - Muito Mais Eco: Gestão Ambiental em Posto de ... | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
Engenheira Sanitarista e Ambiental e Mestre em Engenharia Ambiental Urbana pela UFBA. Funcionária da Área de Meio Ambiente do Serviço Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial – SENAI Unidade CETIND e docente das ...
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Gosto Natural Orgânico: ingredientes frescos, receitas vibrantes, menu diário

Gosto Natural Orgânico: ingredientes frescos, receitas vibrantes, menu diário | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
RT @AilinAleixo: Gosto Natural Orgânico: ingredientes frescos, receitas vibrantes, menu diário http://t.co/7PGkyAZa...
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New Levi's jeans will be 20 percent plastic bottle

New Levi's jeans will be 20 percent plastic bottle | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
Levi Strauss & Co. has announced a new collection of denim apparel, including jeans, that will be comprised of a minimum 20 percent of plastics recycled fro...

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Rainbow Bracelet Made of Tagua Nut Vegetable Ivory

Rainbow Bracelet Made of Tagua Nut Vegetable Ivory | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it

These Products are Organic, Natural and 100% Eco-Friendly. There is no Plastic or toxic material attached. Tagua nut, Coconut, Bull Horn, Amazonian Seeds and Sea Shells are Rich and Luxuries Jewelry Materials. Our Products are designer collection and handmade by highly skilled craftsmen and women therefore each finished product is exclusive, unique and is one of a kind. Note: Each product will have same design, but color varies a lot as these products are cleaned, dyed, buffed and polished which is a skill and a time taking process, some nuts and seeds naturally take dark or light color tones. Each Bull horn has its own natural color and texture. Our Promise is to keep the Quality elite.

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Haitian Farmers Reject Monsanto Donation | Food Safety News

Haitian Farmers Reject Monsanto Donation | Food Safety News | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it

The Peasant Movement of Papay, a group of Haitian farmers, has committed to burning 60,000 seed sacks (475 tons) of hybrid corn and vegetable seeds donated by Monsanto in the wake of the devastating earthquake earlier this year.


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Maysa Motta Gadelha's comment, October 29, 2012 11:51 AM
I Monsanto gifted them it is not a good thing... poor them what a big doubt, to feed people or to save people for a moment...Lets help Haity.
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In 1999, 35 million small family plots produced 90% of Russia’s potatoes, 77% of vegetables, 87% of fruits, 59% of meat, 49% of milk — way to go, people!

In 1999, 35 million small family plots produced 90% of Russia’s potatoes, 77% of vegetables, 87% of fruits, 59% of meat, 49% of milk — way to go, people! | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it
And since 1999, it seems things have only gotten better when it comes to small-scale agriculture in Russia.  In 2003 the Russian President signed into law a further “Private Garden Plot Act&#...

 

 

In 2003 the Russian President signed into law a further “Private Garden Plot Act” enabling Russian citizens to receive free of charge from the state, plots of land in private inheritable ownership. Sizes of the plots differ by region but are between one and three hectares each [1 hectare = 2.2 acres]. Produce grown on these plots is not subject to taxation. A further subsequent law to facilitate the acquisition of land for gardening was passed in June 2006. (according to a footnote in “Who We Are” by Vladimir Megre, pg. 42)

What other country raises so much of their food in such sustainable, organic, and non-GMO modes of production? While the European Union is setting the stage for agribusiness takeovers of major market share from traditional peasant farmers in places like Poland, Russia seems to be one of the few countries on the global stage moving so clearly in a sustainable and healthy direction.

And while organic farming gets a lot of media attention in North America, the fraction of agricultural land actually under organic cultivation is miniscule at 0.6%. The EU is a bit better at 4%. In spite of the minimal land area under organic cultivation, the movement for healthy agriculture in North America is under increasing siege by government “regulators”.

So what’s behind this wonderful new revival of Russian peasant agriculture? Could it be as simple as one person — Anastasia — a 40-year-old woman from Siberia who befriended a traveling Russian entrepreneur? Based on material Anastasia gave him, that entrepreneur, Vladimir Megre, has published nine books which have become underground best-sellers in Russia.

One of Anastasia’s imaginations, which Megre describes in considerable detail, is a future in which more and more people live on small (one-hectare) homesteads, which she calls Kin’s Domains. There they cultivate the earth to grow trees and raise vegetables and fruits of exceptional nutritional value, with enough surplus to sell. Anastasia imagines a national culture based on simple rural life in eco-villages like these, in which values of health, love, truth, freedom and beauty take precedence. Eventually she sees this leading to a booming business in eco-tourism as people from all over the world want to come to Russia and catch with their own eyes a glimpse of what humanity and the world can become.

Anastasia, however, is not just a simple peasant woman. In fact, she seems to be something of a spiritual adept, in the ancient Vedic tradition. In addition to her suggestions for agriculture and nutrition, she shares with author Vladimir Megre, insights on subjects as diverse as statecraft and the education of children. The books are an enjoyable and educational read. Though it’s sometimes tiresome to wade through Megre’s personal struggles with the material, I don’t think there’s anything I’ve seen yet that quite compares with what Anastasia has put before us in these few slim volumes. She describes her mission as helping people find their way through “the dark forces’ window of time”. And that’s something we could sure use some help with. Thanks Anastasia!


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Why genetically engineered food is dangerous: New report by genetic engineers

Why genetically engineered food is dangerous: New report by genetic engineers | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it

Genetic engineering as used in crop development is not precise or predictable and has not been shown to be safe. The technique can result in the unexpected production of toxins or allergens in food that are unlikely to be spotted in current regulatory checks.

 

GM crops, including some that are already in our food and animal feed supply, have shown clear signs of toxicity in animal feeding trials – notably disturbances in liver and kidney function and immune responses.

 

GM proponents have dismissed these statistically significant findings as “not biologically relevant/significant”, based on scientifically indefensible arguments.

 

Certain EU-commissioned animal feeding trials with GM foods and crops are often claimed by GM proponents to show they are safe. In fact, examination of these studies shows significant differences between the GM-fed and control animals that give cause for concern.

 

GM foods have not been properly tested in humans, but the few studies that have been carried out in humans give cause for concern.

 

The US FDA does not require mandatory safety testing of GM crops, and does not even assess the safety of GM crops but only “deregulates” them, based on assurances from biotech companies that they are “substantially equivalent” to their non-GM counterparts. This is like claiming that a cow with BSE is substantially equivalent to a cow that does not have BSE and is thus safe to eat! Claims of substantial equivalence cannot be justified on scientific grounds.

 

The regulatory regime for GM foods is weakest in the US, where GM foods do not even have to be assessed for safety or labelled in the marketplace, but in most regions of the world regulations are inadequate to protect people’s health from the potential adverse effects of GM foods.

 

In the EU, where the regulatory system is often claimed to be strict, minimal pre-market testing is required for a GMO and the tests are commissioned by the same companies that stand to profit from the GMO if it is approved – a clear conflict of interest.

 

No long-term toxicological testing of GMOs on animals or testing on humans is required by any regulatory agency in the world.

 

Biotech companies have used patent claims and intellectual property protection laws to restrict access of independent researchers to GM crops for research purposes. As a result, limited research has been conducted on GM foods and crops by scientists who are independent of the GM industry. Scientists whose work has raised concerns about the safety of GMOs have been attacked and discredited in orchestrated campaigns by GM crop promoters.

 

Most GM crops (over 75%) are engineered to tolerate applications of herbicides. Where such GM crops have been adopted, they have led to massive increases in herbicide use.

 

Roundup, the herbicide that over 50% of all GM crops are engineered to tolerate, is not safe or benign as has been claimed but has been found to cause malformations (birth defects), reproductive problems, DNA damage, and cancer in test animals. Human epidemiological studies have found an association between Roundup exposure and miscarriage, birth defects, neurological development problems, DNA damage, and certain types of cancer.

 

A public health crisis has erupted in GM soy-producing regions of South America, where people exposed to spraying with Roundup and other agrochemicals sprayed on the crop report escalating rates of birth defects and cancer.

 

A large number of studies indicate that Roundup is associated with increased crop diseases, especially infection with Fusarium, a fungus that causes wilt disease in soy and can have toxic effects on humans and livestock.

 

Bt insecticidal GM crops do not sustainably reduce pesticide use but change the way in which pesticides are used: from sprayed on, to built in.

 

Bt technology is proving unsustainable as pests evolve resistance to the toxin and secondary pest infestations are becoming common.

 

GM proponents claim that the Bt toxin engineered into GM plants is safe because the natural form of Bt, long used as a spray by conventional and organic farmers, has a history of safe use. But the GM forms of Bt toxins are different from the natural forms and could have different toxic and allergenic effects.

 

GM Bt toxin is not limited in its toxicity to insect pests. GM Bt crops have been found to have toxic effects on laboratory animals in feeding trials.

 

GM Bt crops have been found to have toxic effects on non-target organisms in the environment.Bt toxin is not fully broken down in digestion and has been found circulating in the blood of pregnant women in Canada and in the blood supply to their foetuses.

 

The no-till method of farming promoted with GM herbicide-tolerant crops, which avoids ploughing and uses herbicides to control weeds, is not more climate-friendly than ploughing.

 

No-till fields do not store more carbon in the soil than ploughed fields when deeper levels of soil are measured.No-till increases the negative environmental impacts of soy cultivation, because of the herbicides used.

 

Golden Rice, a beta-carotene-enriched rice, is promoted as a GM crop that could help malnourished people overcome vitamin A deficiency. But Golden Rice has not been tested for toxicological safety, has been plagued by basic development problems, and, after more than 12 years and millions of dollars of research funding, is still not ready for the market. Meanwhile, inexpensive and effective solutions to vitamin A deficiency are available but under-used due to lack of funding.

 

GM crops are often promoted as a “vital tool in the toolbox” to feed the world’s growing population, but many experts question the contribution they could make, as they do not offer higher yields or cope better with drought than non-GM crops. Most GM crops are engineered to tolerate herbicides or to contain a pesticide – traits that are irrelevant to feeding the hungry.

 

High adoption of GM crops among farmers is not a sign that the GM crop is superior to non-GM varieties, as once GM companies gain control of the seed market, they withdraw non-GM seed varieties from the market. The notion of “farmer choice” does not apply in this situation.

 

GM contamination of non-GM and organic crops has resulted in massive financial losses by the food and feed industry, involving product recalls, lawsuits, and lost markets.

 

When many people read about high-yielding, pest- and disease-resistant, drought-tolerant, and nutritionally improved super-crops, they think of GM. In fact, these are all products of conventional breeding, which continues to outstrip GM in producing such crops. The report contains a long list of these conventional crop breeding successes.

 

Certain “supercrops” have been claimed to be GM successes when in fact they are products of conventional breeding, in some cases assisted by the non-GM biotechnology of marker assisted selection.

 

Conventional plant breeding, with the help of non-GM biotechnologies such as marker assisted selection, is a safer and more powerful method than GM to produce new crop varieties required to meet current and future needs of food production, especially in the face of rapid climate change.

 

Conventionally bred, locally adapted crops, used in combination with agroecological farming practices, offer a proven, sustainable approach to ensuring global food security.

 

 

http://earthopensource.org/index.php/news/60-why-genetically-engineered-food-is-dangerous-new-report-by-genetic-engineers?goback=.gde_1691777_member_170384379

 

 


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Alternative farming focus of tour

Alternative farming focus of tour | Ecofriendly goods | Scoop.it

28 participants thoroughly enjoyed the recent Alternative Farming tour hosted by the Northeast Nebraska Resource Conservation and Development (RC&D) Council.


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