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Not All Developers Hate Twitter's New API Rules | Marketing Land

Not All Developers Hate Twitter's New API Rules | Marketing Land | digital culture | Scoop.it
The dust is still settling on yesterday’s news that Twitter is prepping a new API for release in the near future. And while many developers immediately slammed Twitter’s new rules, not everyone is angry about the changes.

It’s hard to fault Twitter for wanting to grow its business but, as Twitter users, we have to hope that it finds a way to balance innovation and creativity — the kind often found in third-party apps and not in Twitter’s own products — with the bottom line.

 

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Private justice: How Hollywood money put a Brit behind bars | Ars Technica

Private justice: How Hollywood money put a Brit behind bars | Ars Technica | digital culture | Scoop.it
Anton Vickerman, 38-year old owner of the once popular link site surfthechannel.com (STC), was sentenced to four years in prison on Tuesday by a British judge. But the prosecutors sitting across the courtroom from him didn't work for the Crown—they were lawyers for the movie studio trade group Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT).

FACT, not public officials in the UK, was the driving force behind Vickerman's prosecution. Indeed, FACT effectively took on the role of a private law enforcement agency. Private investigators hired by FACT first identified Vickerman as the administrator of STC and built the case against him. His assets were frozen at FACT's request by a government agency—which was itself funded by FACT. And when the UK's public prosecutors decided not to press charges against Vickerman at all, FACT initiated a criminal prosecution on its own dime.

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Introducing PyBossa – the open-source micro-tasking platform | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

Introducing PyBossa – the open-source micro-tasking platform | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog | digital culture | Scoop.it

For a while now our network has been working on applications, tools and platforms for crowd-sourcing and micro-tasking. At the end of last year, we posted about a cute little app developed at a hackday called the Data Digitizer that was being used to transcribe Brazillian budgetary data.

In recent months we’ve been working closely with the Citizen Cyberscience Center on an exciting new platform called PyBossa. In a nut-shell, PyBossa is a free, open-source crowd-sourcing and micro-tasking platform. It enables people to create and run projects that utilise online assistance in performing tasks that require human cognition such as image classification, transcription, geocoding and more. PyBossa is there to help researchers, civic hackers and developers to create projects where anyone around the world with some time, interest and an internet connection can contribute.

There is already a wealth of such projects, including long-running ones such as FreeBMD – a huge effort to transcribe the Civil Registration of births, marriages and deaths in the UK – as well as more recent ones such as GalaxyZoo – a hugely successful project based on volunteer efforts to classify photographs of galaxies taken by the Hubble telescope.

With PyBossa we want to make the creation of such potentially transformative projects as easy as possible and so PyBossa is different to existing efforts

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Music Discovery Still Dominated by Radio, Says Nielsen Music 360 Report | Nielsen

Music Discovery Still Dominated by Radio, Says Nielsen Music 360 Report | Nielsen | digital culture | Scoop.it

"More Teens Listen to Music Through YouTube Than Any Other Source" (Nielsen’s “Music 360” Report Offers Comprehensive Insights on all Aspects of Music Interaction)

 

Radio is still the dominant way people discover music (48%) – followed by tips from friends/relatives (10%), and YouTube (7%), but more teens listen to music through YouTube than through any other source (64%) -- followed by radio (56%) and iTunes (53% ) and CDs (50%) - according to results from a comprehensive, in-depth Nielsen study of consumer interaction with music in the United States, the Music 360. The new Nielsen report offers insights on all aspects of music consumption including listening and purchasing behaviors; music discovery; live events; the use of social networking and mobile music apps; as well as how the economy is affecting music sales.

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How Big Data Became So Big | Steve Lohr @NYTimes

How Big Data Became So Big | Steve Lohr @NYTimes | digital culture | Scoop.it
Judging from its many turns in the spotlight this year, the term “Big Data” has entered the mainstream.

The Big Data story is the making of a meme. And two vital ingredients seem to be at work here. The first is that the term itself is not too technical, yet is catchy and vaguely evocative. The second is that behind the term is an evolving set of technologies with great promise, and some pitfalls.

Big Data is a shorthand label that typically means applying the tools of artificial intelligence, like machine learning, to vast new troves of data beyond that captured in standard databases. The new data sources include Web-browsing data trails, social network communications, sensor data and surveillance data.

The combination of the data deluge and clever software algorithms opens the door to new business opportunities. Google and Facebook, for example, are Big Data companies. The Watson computer from I.B.M. that beat human “Jeopardy” champions last year was a triumph of Big Data computing. In theory, Big Data could improve decision-making in fields from business to medicine, allowing decisions to be based increasingly on data and analysis rather than intuition and experience.

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Cyborg America: inside the strange new world of basement body hackers | The Verge

Cyborg America: inside the strange new world of basement body hackers | The Verge | digital culture | Scoop.it

Shawn Sarver took a deep breath and stared at the bottle of Listerine on the counter. “A minty fresh feeling for your mouth... cures bad breath,” he repeated to himself, as the scalpel sliced open his ring finger. His left arm was stretched out on the operating table, his sleeve rolled up past the elbow, revealing his first tattoo, the Air Force insignia he got at age 18, a few weeks after graduating from high school. Sarver was trying a technique he learned in the military to block out the pain, since it was illegal to administer anesthetic for his procedure.

“A minty fresh feeling... cures bad breath,” Sarver muttered through gritted teeth, his eyes staring off into a void.

Tim, the proprietor of Hot Rod Piercing in downtown Pittsburgh, put down the scalpel and picked up an instrument called an elevator, which he used to separate the flesh inside in Sarver’s finger, creating a small empty pocket of space. Then, with practiced hands, he slid a tiny rare earth metal inside the open wound, the width of a pencil eraser and thinner than a dime. When he tried to remove his tool, however, the metal disc stuck to the tweezers. “Let’s try this again,” Tim said. “Almost done.”

The implant stayed put the second time. Tim quickly stitched the cut shut, and cleaned off the blood. “Want to try it out?” he asked Sarver, who nodded with excitement. Tim dangled the needle from a string of suture next to Sarver’s finger, closer and closer, until suddenly, it jumped through the air and stuck to his flesh, attracted by the magnetic pull of the mineral implant.

“I’m a cyborg!” Sarver cried, getting up to join his friends in the waiting room outside. Tim started prepping a new tray of clean surgical tools. Now it was my turn.

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Collect and Organize All Social Media Items Published About an Event with Eventifier | Eventifier.co

Collect and Organize All Social Media Items Published About an Event with Eventifier | Eventifier.co | digital culture | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Eventifier offers an easy way to auto-collect and organize all of the video, photos, tweets, slides and other social "artifacts" shared online about a specific event.

 

To make its "magic" Eventifier taps into reference hastags that you provide when registering an event, and other relevant meta-info, like the location, type and place of event you want to "curate".

 

Eventifier provides also a live dashboard to enable you to interact and respond to all this incoming media from one central location.

 

From the official site: "We all are interested in Events and to know about all the happenings in and around the events. Who were the speakers? What were the tweets for the event? Shared pictures & videos and what were the slides for the various sessions?

 

However this dataflow is scattered; searching, finding and storing this information in the vastness of internet is broken to us. These data are very random; hard to find and sort.

 

Eventifier was born from this annoyance. We thrive to make your information flow and archiving of event data effortless."

 

 

See examples: http://eventifier.co/events/ ;

 

Try it out: http://eventifier.co/

 

 


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Networked Individualism | P2P Foundation

Networked Individualism | P2P Foundation | digital culture | Scoop.it

"‘networked individualism’ = approach led by the Toronto network analyst Barry Wellman. Wellman has denounced the smuggling of obsolete notions of community from an earlier period of North American community studies into Internet localisation studies. Where the old communities had ‘streets and alleys’, Internet researchers are now imagining communities bound ‘by bits and bytes’ (Hampton and Wellman 2003). For Wellman this is an analytical cul-de-sac, for the crucible of North American sociality has long ceased to be the local neighbourhood (Wellman and Leighton 1979). This does not mean, Wellman insists, that communities have disappeared. Rather they have survived in the form of geographically dispersed personal communities, i.e. personal networks (Pahl 2005). The Internet merely reinforces a global trend towards networked individualism that was already well under way (Wellman et al 2003, Castells 2001)." (http://johnpostill.co.uk/articles/postill_localising_net.pdf)

 

Michael Gurstein:
'Castells and Wellman and his colleagues have argued that the Digital or Information Society (or in their term the “networked society”) results in social relationships characterized by what they call “networked individualism”
- …It is the move from densely-knit and tightly-bounded groups to sparsely-knit and loosely-bounded networks. Each person is a switchboard, between ties and networks. People remain connected, but as individuals, rather than being rooted in the home bases of work unit and household. Each person operates a separate personal community network, and switches rapidly among multiple sub-networks.


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Big data is our generation’s civil rights issue, and we don’t know it | O'Reilly Radar

Big data is our generation’s civil rights issue, and we don’t know it | O'Reilly Radar | digital culture | Scoop.it

Data doesn’t invade people’s lives. Lack of control over how it’s used does.

What’s really driving so-called big data isn’t the volume of information. It turns out big data doesn’t have to be all that big. Rather, it’s about a reconsideration of the fundamental economics of analyzing data.

For decades, there’s been a fundamental tension between three attributes of databases. You can have the data fast; you can have it big; or you can have it varied. The catch is, you can’t have all three at once.

With the new, data-is-abundant model, we collect first and ask questions later. The schema comes after the collection. Indeed, big data success stories like Splunk, Palantir, and others are prized because of their ability to make sense of content well after it’s been collected — sometimes called a schema-less query. This means we collect information long before we decide what it’s for.

And this is a dangerous thing.

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Dear Mark Zuckerberg Open Letter Slam By Young and Up & Coming Silicon Valley Entrepreneur Dalton Caldwell | SiliconANGLE

Dear Mark Zuckerberg Open Letter Slam By Young and Up & Coming Silicon Valley Entrepreneur Dalton Caldwell | SiliconANGLE | digital culture | Scoop.it

Dalton Caldwell @DaltonC is the founder of App.net, a social platform that is pivoting after Facebook offered to buy it or kill it. Dalton is the creator of imeem, a social music site that was acquired by MySpace. I first met Dalton seven years ago when he was one of my first guys that I did a podcast with in 2005 as part of my last venture PodTech.net. This post is listed here in full here on SiliconANGLE to preserve for the record. This post was posted on his blog two days ago and has since been part of a Silicon Valley inside baseball firestorm around what should a open social platform look like.

"Dear Mark Zuckerberg,

...I believe that future social platforms will behave more like infrastructure, and less like media companies. I believe that a number of smaller, interoperable social platforms with a clear, sustainable business models will usurp you. These future companies will be valued at a small fraction of what Facebook and Twitter currently are. I think that is OK. Platforms are judged by the value generated by their ecosystem, not by the value the platforms directly capture."

 

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Twitter at a crossroads: Economic value vs. information value | Mathew Ingram @ GigaOm

Twitter at a crossroads: Economic value vs. information value | Mathew Ingram @ GigaOm | digital culture | Scoop.it

As Twitter tries to evolve from being a real-time information network into a multibillion-dollar commercial media entity, it is having to face the inherent conflict between those two goals, and many critics see the suspension of journalist Gary Adams’ account as a symptom of that conflict.

Almost every day, it seems, we get further evidence of the dilemma at the heart of Twitter’s ongoing evolution from real-time information network into multibillion-dollar commercial media entity — and the latest is the furor over the company’s suspension of the Twitter account belonging to Guy Adams, a British journalist. As Jeff Jarvis and Dan Gillmor and others have noted, regardless of the details of this specific case, it seems like a defining moment for Twitter: the network that has bragged in the past about being the “free-speech wing of the free-speech party” now looks to be censoring journalists who criticize the company’s corporate partners. How the company decides to handle this incident will speak volumes about where Twitter’s future lies.

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The Rise of Vendor Relationship Management | Edge Perspectives with John Hagel

The Rise of Vendor Relationship Management | Edge Perspectives with John Hagel | digital culture | Scoop.it

Doc Searls, the key architect of the VRM movement and a co-author of "The Cluetrain Manifesto," has written a powerful new book, "The Intention Economy," analyzing the reasons for this shift and its implications for companies that want to continue to create economic value. His book is a graphic demonstration of the shift from push to pull that is disrupting our business world (not to mention all of our other institutions).

Most of us think of markets in conventional terms – it is about vendors seeking out customers and persuading them to buy more of their products and services. A reverse market flips this dynamic – it’s about customers seeking out the most relevant vendors and extracting more and more value at lower and lower cost. It’s a fundamentally different mindset. It turns much of what we know about business on its head. Framing it in these terms can create a zero sum view – either vendors win or customers win. As Doc persuasively argues, though, a customer driven market actually generates significant growth in demand that will serve both vendors and customers well.

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Global Warming's Terrifying New Math | Rolling Stone

Global Warming's Terrifying New Math | Rolling Stone | digital culture | Scoop.it

Three simple numbers that add up to global catastrophe - and that make clear who the real enemy is...

The Third Number: 2,795 Gigatons

This number is the scariest of all – one that, for the first time, meshes the political and scientific dimensions of our dilemma. It was highlighted last summer by the Carbon Tracker Initiative, a team of London financial analysts and environmentalists who published a report in an effort to educate investors about the possible risks that climate change poses to their stock portfolios. The number describes the amount of carbon already contained in the proven coal and oil and gas reserves of the fossil-fuel companies, and the countries (think Venezuela or Kuwait) that act like fossil-fuel companies. In short, it's the fossil fuel we're currently planning to burn. And the key point is that this new number – 2,795 – is higher than 565. Five times higher.

Which is exactly why this new number, 2,795 gigatons, is such a big deal. Think of two degrees Celsius as the legal drinking limit – equivalent to the 0.08 blood-alcohol level below which you might get away with driving home. The 565 gigatons is how many drinks you could have and still stay below that limit – the six beers, say, you might consume in an evening. And the 2,795 gigatons? That's the three 12-packs the fossil-fuel industry has on the table, already opened and ready to pour.

We have five times as much oil and coal and gas on the books as climate scientists think is safe to burn. We'd have to keep 80 percent of those reserves locked away underground to avoid that fate. Before we knew those numbers, our fate had been likely. Now, barring some massive intervention, it seems certain.

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Customers Will Be in Control | Doc Searls @ WSJ

Customers Will Be in Control | Doc Searls @ WSJ | digital culture | Scoop.it

The move toward individual empowerment is a long, gradual revolution. It began with the first personal computers, which caught on in the early 1980s. With PCs, people got the power to do what big business called "data processing"—but in many more ways than any company could ever do. The next stage in the revolution was networking. There were "local area networks" and "online services" available before the Internet, but none that made individuals free to network on their own. The Internet did that.

The third stage was smartphones. With smartphones, the individual has both computing and networking in a device as portable as a wallet—but not as personal. Smartphones do provide a lot of freedom, but they are still controlled by phone companies, and in some cases (notably Apple's) also by the manufacturer. This wasn't true of the PC, and it isn't true of the Internet.

This revolution in personal liberation and empowerment won't be complete until we are free to use our computing and networking powers with any device we like, outside the exclusive confines of "providers." This won't be easy. Big companies and old industries are notoriously bad at changing their ways and giving up control, even when obvious opportunities argue for embracing openness and change. There is also big money behind "big data" and supporting the belief that marketing machinery can know people better than people know themselves.

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Coming Soon: Artificial Limbs Controlled by Thoughts | Scientific American

Coming Soon: Artificial Limbs Controlled by Thoughts | Scientific American | digital culture | Scoop.it
The idea that paralyzed people might one day control their limbs just by thinking is no longer a Hollywood-style fantasy...

In 2014 billions of viewers worldwide may remember the opening game of the World Cup in Brazil for more than just the goals scored by the Brazilian national team and the red cards given to its adversary. On that day my laboratory at Duke University, which specializes in developing technologies that allow electrical signals from the brain to control robotic limbs, plans to mark a milestone in overcoming paralysis.

If we succeed in meeting still formidable challenges, the first ceremonial kick of the World Cup game may be made by a paralyzed teenager, who, flanked by the two contending soccer teams, will saunter onto the pitch clad in a robotic body suit. This suit—or exoskeleton, as we call it—will envelop the teenager's legs. His or her first steps onto the field will be controlled by motor signals originating in the kicker's brain and transmitted wirelessly to a computer unit the size of a laptop in a backpack carried by our patient. This computer will be responsible for translating electrical brain signals into digital motor commands so that the exoskeleton can first stabilize the kicker's body weight and then induce the robotic legs to begin the back-and-forth coordinated movements of a walk over the manicured grass. Then, on approaching the ball, the kicker will visualize placing a foot in contact with it. Three hundred milliseconds later brain signals will instruct the exoskeleton's robotic foot to hook under the leather sphere, Brazilian style, and boot it aloft.

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Open innovation in digital journalism: Examining the impact of Open APIs at four news organizations | Article

Open innovation in digital journalism: Examining the impact of Open APIs at four news organizations | Article | digital culture | Scoop.it

by Tanja Aitamurto (Stanford University, USA) and Seth C Lewis (University of Minnesota, USA)

This article examines the relative value of open innovation principles for digital media, exemplified by the emergence of Open Application Programming Interfaces (Open APIs) at four news organizations: The New York Times, The Guardian, USA Today and NPR. The use of Open APIs represents a shift toward an open innovation paradigm that may help address twin challenges facing the news industry: the need for improved R&D and the need for new revenue streams. This paper extends the interdisciplinary study of open innovation to digital communication. Findings indicate that the use of Open APIs has accelerated R&D through knowledge-sharing with web developers; generated new means of commercializing content by extending a firm’s product portfolio; and forged innovation networks that function as external R&D departments. The article discusses the constant negotiation between openness and control, and open and closed paradigms in journalism.

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Google Gives Big Content an Olive Branch in Search Algorithm Change | Threat Level | Wired.com

Google Gives Big Content an Olive Branch in Search Algorithm Change | Threat Level | Wired.com | digital culture | Scoop.it

Google will begin altering its search algorithm this week to lower search rankings of sites with “high numbers” of copyright-infringement removal notices.

Google is mum on the details of the plan, which some digital rights groups like Public Knowledge suggest is “setting up a process that can be abused” because “entities with questionable copyright claims might be more willing to send” takedown notices to Google.

The search giant’s move looks to be designed to head off potential legislation giving the Justice Department the power to seek court orders requiring search engines like Google include in search results websites the government declares to be rogue. Such a feature was included in the Stop Online Piracy Act, which was defeated for altogether different reasons in January because the package also included tinkering with the (DNS) domain name system.

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Mercury's comment, August 14, 2012 7:11 AM
I assume then youtube results will be effected. We shall see.
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The Future of Programming – hint: it’s not a new IDE! | ChangeArc

The Future of Programming – hint: it’s not a new IDE! | ChangeArc | digital culture | Scoop.it

It struck me as quite funny that so many in the “Agile community” and many other people are debating about pair programming… Strangely enough, these kids haven’t been listening to that or going to “the right conferences” and taken it to the next level of what @JenniferSertl calls “social coding”. How spot on!

Imagine this in a corporation, with a live stream of the developers, chatting by voice, then the “product owners” chatting in a window (you have to limit their bandwidth somehow ;) seeing the software develop in real time! Getting a bit boring? Go away and come back later…

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Collective Presencing: A New Human Capacity | Kosmos Journal

Collective Presencing: A New Human Capacity | Kosmos Journal | digital culture | Scoop.it

There is overwhelming evidence that human consciousness is evolving, moving from collective tribal living, where the individual was totally embedded in the life patterns of the collective; through a gradual, often painful, process of individuation, with the emphasis on the will and sovereignty of the individual; to what is emerging in our time: a conscious return to collectivism where individuated, or self-actualised, individuals voluntarily—sometimes temporarily—pool their consciousness in a search for the elusive collective intelligence that can help us to overcome the stupendous challenges now facing us as a species as a consequence of how our developmental trajectory has manifested on the physical plane thus far.

 

So human evolution has something to do with human consciousness awakening first to itself, then to its own evolution and then to a recognition of and, finally, an embodied experience of the ways in which we are organically part of a larger whole, as we have always been but have forgotten. As we enter this new stage of individual/collective awakening, men and women are being increasingly called to practice the new life-form composed of groups of individuated individuals merging their collective intelligence as the ‘Circle Being.’


Via Anne Caspari
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Ela Srofton's curator insight, August 27, 2013 5:48 AM

The widening movement expands the individual’s embrace, going through the deepening practices of observing, honouring and living what is, described above, starting with my relationship to myself, and panning out to include my relationship with others, with the group, and with future potential. - See more at: http://www.kosmosjournal.org/articles/collective-presencing-a-new-human-capacity#sthash.sSTjSGfm.dpuf

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BitTorrent Announces Plans To Help Artists Get Paid While Giving Their Creations Away For Free | Techdirt

BitTorrent Announces Plans To Help Artists Get Paid While Giving Their Creations Away For Free | Techdirt | digital culture | Scoop.it

In many people's minds (especially those in certain industries), the word "torrent" is synonymous with piracy. This has obviously caused a bit of problem for BitTorrent, Inc., the parent company of BitTorrent client, uTorrent. Despite the fact that uTorrent has legitimate uses, most members of the press and politicians continue to link BitTorrent with the act of copyright infringement, and in some cases, seem to believe that The Pirate Bay and BitTorrent are either related businesses, if not actually the same entity.

 

Following the footsteps of Youtube, BitTorrent is experimenting with ways to help artists make money while still giving away their work for free. The first experiment goes live today.

 

Torrentfreak has the details:

 

'The idea is simple. BitTorrent Inc. helps artists to promote a bundle of free content to their 150 million users. This bundle includes a piece of sponsored software such as a media player or anti-virus package that can be installed as an option. When a user installs the free software, both the artist and BitTorrent get a cut of the proceeds.

“We believe we can make digital distribution even more viable for creators and fans. So, beginning now, we’ll be testing new ways to drive profitability for creators while delivering even more meaningful media experiences for our users,” BitTorrent CEO Eric Klinker comments on the announcement.'

 


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Abundance on Trial: The Cultural Significance of “Sustainability” - by Joshua J. Yates | IASC-Culture.org

Abundance on Trial: The Cultural Significance of “Sustainability” - by Joshua J. Yates | IASC-Culture.org | digital culture | Scoop.it

Every now and then a single word emerges from our common parlance to achieve the status of a master term. Such a word gives expression to discrete needs and purposes, but it also provides a perspicuous lens through which to view the ethical disposition and emotional temper of a culture at a particular moment in time. The argument of this essay is that “sustainability” has become just such a word for our moment, deserving closer attention than it has so far received.
This essay seeks to address a set of neglected questions about the cultural significance of sustainability’s rise to a master term in our society and to distill its deeper moral and ethical salience from the wide spectrum of its connotations and applications. We will see how varying concerns over what Americans (and humans more generally) are not presently sustaining reflect a deep-seated anxiety that goes to the very heart of our most basic assumptions about what it means and takes to thrive in the contemporary world. Specifically, we will see how such assumptions are themselves connected to growing uncertainty over whether the relationship between humans and nature is one primarily defined by scarcity or abundance. In light of these anxieties and uncertainties, we will also see how the rise of sustainability to a master term represents accumulating disappointment and disillusionment with those key terms once believed constitutive of modern progress—terms like “development,” “improvement,” and “growth.” The cultural significance of sustainability, in other words, is related to the mounting scrutiny and doubt now facing the master terms of modern progress.

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Google’s Gundotra Courts Developers As Facebook and Twitter Stumble | Marketing Pilgrim

Google’s Gundotra Courts Developers As Facebook and Twitter Stumble | Marketing Pilgrim | digital culture | Scoop.it

If you didn’t read Mike Isaac’s great article from yesterday about Twitter’s new Cards technology and the implications for developers in the world of Twitter you should. I’m not a developer but it’s important as marketers to see where Twitter is going as a platform in order to think about how it can be leveraged for marketing needs.
Couple that information with Dalton Caldwell’s open letter to Mark Zuckerberg about his less than stellar experience with a team of executive goons from Facebook and you have an opportunity.

It just might work out in the end that Facebook and Twitter alienate the very people who helped build the respective companies enough that they switch allegiance and work to make Google+ what the others were not. In the end, we the end user could be the ultimate beneficiary of these developer turf wars and that would be a good thing.

 

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With New Funding, DPLA Sets Sights on Search | The Digital Shift

With New Funding, DPLA Sets Sights on Search | The Digital Shift | digital culture | Scoop.it

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) awarded $1 million to fund the creation of the infrastructure for the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) last week, and the organization will now turn its focus toward developing a way to search across the many disparate collections involved with the project.
“The first phase of the project was about planning. We brought a lot of people together in meetings and created workstreams that tackled individual areas,” explained Maura Marx, executive director of the Open Knowledge Commons, an affiliate of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School that is coordinating the DPLA. “So, we had people looking at user [experience], people looking at technology, people looking at content, etc.”

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New economic models from collapse of exchange and use in retail banking | Value Creating Service Systems

New economic models from collapse of exchange and use in retail banking | Value Creating Service Systems | digital culture | Scoop.it

So why could the retail banking 'institutionalised solution' be wrong?

Well, wrong is a little harsh. It's just archaic, inefficient and rather 'inside-out' and sooner or later, it will be replaced (although one must never underestimate the longevity of entrenched institutionalised solutions)

To answer this, let's go back to the simple magic wallet again. The problem with the current retail banking model is that it is still based in an old good-dominant logic of exchange (cue SD logic music now.... Vargo & Lusch 2004, 2008). They are still thinking that revenue (and therefore service) is created at the point of exchange- which is why Barclays, and so many products are doing all these customization, that could result in too many 'choices' problem.

Why is this untenable? because the business model is now becoming too challenging to maintain.

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The 3 pieces that are turning WordPress into a platform | GigaOm

The 3 pieces that are turning WordPress into a platform | GigaOm | digital culture | Scoop.it

These days, WordPress acts more like a development framework or a PaaS (Platform as a Service), says WooThemes CEO Adii Pienaar. And in the last year, several new services have sprung up to help make WordPress a platform in the truest sense of the word.

I’d argue that we have all of the elements we need to make the true “WordPress as a platform” vision a reality. But what’s missing is integrations — API calls and shared data models that can integrate these new offerings into a singular experience.

Even though the parts are pretty damn impressive right now, WordPress can be greater than the sum of its parts.

 

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