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Rescooped by Marianela Camacho Alfaro from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Which Subscription Service is Best for Self-Published Authors: Kindle Unlimited, Scribd or Oyster? | Mediashift

Which Subscription Service is Best for Self-Published Authors: Kindle Unlimited, Scribd or Oyster? | Mediashift | Ebook and Publishing | Scoop.it

Amazon’s new Kindle Unlimited e-book reader subscription program caused a real commotion in the publishing industry last month. But how will this “Netflix for books” model affect the self-publishing industry? Is Kindle Unlimited the best, or should self-publishers join the Scribd or Oyster programs instead? How do you get in? Read on for a comparison of these top three reader subscription programs and best recommendations for self-publishers who are looking to add these channels to their revenue streams....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:56 PM

Carla King compares the three major e-book subscription services with tips for self published authors

Scooped by Marianela Camacho Alfaro
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Price times units sold

Marianela Camacho Alfaro's insight:

"Publishers have defended agency pricing as a way to ensure that healthy competition is maintained among ebook retailers. If all outlets offer a book on equal terms (went the argument), the price incentive disappears and stores compete on service. This is one of the reasons many European markets maintain fixed-book-price laws.

Arguing that the largest retailer should offer discounts that few or no other retailers can match potentially hastens the loss of smaller, independent stores. If you believe that support in niche markets comes largely from these kinds of retail outlets, weakening them is a bad move."

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Rescooped by Marianela Camacho Alfaro from Writing Rightly
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How to find a beta reader for your self-published book | Self-Publishing Advice

How to find a beta reader for your self-published book | Self-Publishing Advice | Ebook and Publishing | Scoop.it

U.S. fantasy author Michael La Ronn offers top tips on how to find beta readers to help you improve the quality of your self-published books


Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, April 24, 2014 6:30 PM

 

So you've written a book. Now what? Many authors use "beta" readers. That is, a person who will read your book draft and give you constructive criticism.

 

The writer, Michael La Ronn, shares some thought-provoking suggestions on how to find your perfect beta reader through Goodreads.com. Goodreads was just purchased by Amazon, so it could be the perfect match for author and reader.

 

Apparently, YA, epic fantasy, romance, and sci-fi authors may have an easier time finding their readers. Persistence is the key, according to La Ronn, and he gives several great tips on searching for and cultivating the author/beta reader relationship.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Link to the original article: http://www.selfpublishingadvice.org/writing-how-to-find-beta-readers/

Rescooped by Marianela Camacho Alfaro from Writing for Kindle
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The digital truths traditional publishers don't want to hear - The Guardian (blog)

The digital truths traditional publishers don't want to hear - The Guardian (blog) | Ebook and Publishing | Scoop.it

The Guardian (blog)
The digital truths traditional publishers don't want to hear
"Digital book distribution is available to anyone who wants it."


Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, April 29, 2013 4:20 PM

 

I was interested to read insights by Barry Eisler, best-selling traditional and now-self-published author. He asked the question, "The choices are good for writers, so why are legacy publishers so angry?"

 

Book distribution via paper publishing has been in existence forever, until the introduction of Amazon Kindle in 2007. Has it only been 6 years?  The writer could hire out everything EXCEPT distribution. Now the tables have  clearly turned. The writer has the world at his or her fingertips.

 

85% of a writer's revenues were turned over to the book distributor for an entire publishing package. A writer can now take 70% of the profits their self-published book between $2.99-$9.99 on Amazon.

 

Traditional publishers are scrambling. Who's in the driver's seat now?

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing for Kindle"***

 

Link to the full article: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2013/apr/29/digital-truths-traditional-publishers