Eating disorders Around the World
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Eating disorders around the World

Eating disorders are affecting not only white american women.

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Bordo, Susan. “ The Globalization of Eating Disorders” The McGraw Hill Reader: Issues across the Disciplines. Ed. Gilbert H. Muller. 11th ed. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2011 723-726. Print.

     In this essay written by Susan Bordo, goes in depth not just about eating disorders, but what is happening around the world. Young girls have this image set in the mind that they need to look like. Women want to look like these models, actresses that are showed all over the technology. This girl saw herself looking to Christina Aguilera, Pink, etc. and she hated herself for not looking like that. Bordo says that you wouldn’t see her as black, Asian, or Latina, but she is this black woman who suffers from anorexia. When we hear of someone with an eating disorder you think of a white women, but it suffers around the whole world with women of many different cultures. In the world today we have so many images that we can get a hold of and look through which is causing women to want to be someone else. Eating disorders are affecting Black African, Asian and even Latina women, not only white American women. With fast food restaurant on every corner obesity is increases, but now we see fat people as looking awful. We would think that it only affects women, but men are also being affect by eating disorders. If we start teaching our children the sooner than maybe we can solve some problems of eating disorders and women thinking they need to look like these other people. 

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Low, Elaine. "Eating Disorders Are a Growing Problem Among Asian American Women." Eating Disorders. Ed. Roman Espejo. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Diagnosing the Asian American Eating Disorder." MochiMag.com. 2010. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Apr. 2014.

      Eating disorders do not just affect young American women; they affect all many different ages of women, and many different cultures of women. Eating disorders are not just about weight, but they about eye shape, eye color, color of your skin even, especially with Asian Americans. In Asian culture food is everything, they love to eat food, which is the problem for some Asian women. Because they want to look like the American girls, and they see them and want it. This is the same thing with American girls, they see these girls who are so thin and they want that. People do not realize is that someone with bulimia wants control; they want to control what they eat and how much they eat. Asian women do not usually tell people their issues or problems, which is wrong when you are struggling with an eating disorder. When you have anorexia or bulimia you need to tell someone so you can be honest with them and let them help you. Asian women have the highest suicide rate because of what they are going through they do not share it with anyone. This is a big issues in the essay in McGraw hill reader because its focus is about other cultures around the world dealing with eating disorders. 

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"Author: 'Not All Black Girls Know How to Eat'." Tell Me More 31 Aug. 2009. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Apr. 2014.

      Eating disorders have a stereotype of white women and girls that struggle with eating disorders, but not for Stephanie Covington Armstrong. Stephanie is playwright, screenwriter and author who struggled with bulimia when she was about 21; her story includes an experience with sexual assault. Stephanie grew up with a rough childhood; sister was addicted to drugs and a bad neighborhood. But the bulimia made her shut her off intentionally from the world. When she would beige herself she was feeling not just fat, but she was overwhelmed and having a lot of anxiety. Stephanie was sexually assault by her uncle, it connects to her bulimia because she was feeling such pain but when she would beige it had a sense of relief.  When she tried to get help it was a tough situation for her because she would walk into the room and see all these white women and she always grew up not to tell anyone her secrets. It was difficult for her because normally people do not see a black woman of struggling with eating disorders, but they do everyday. Finally when she got some help, it did not matter the color of your skin they were all the same, dealing with the same issue, all they’re for the same reason to fix their eating disorders. This interview is so powerful because you hear her story and it is amazing how people start getting eating disorders, but they do not have to be white. Many women around the world deal with these kinds of issues and some of them cannot get the help they need. 

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 "Art Therapy." MCT Photos. 2010. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Apr. 2014.

      In this image is a picture of a girl who traced her original outline of what she truly looks like. Then she traced what she thinks that she looks like, and you can see in the image that it is totally different. This image shows that she has a disorder with how she looks, she does not like her body image. Most eating disorders are when they person who has the eating disorder thinks that they look fat or bigger in the mirror, then what they actually look like. This causes problems because girls can lose their lives from starving themselves. Eating disorders and body image is a big problem in America and around the world. Because of these magazines with these models, and the “ideal girl” gets into these girls head and makes them feel like they are not good enough. This image really with help the essay in McGraw Hill reader because this is what it talks about. Girls have this set image of what they need to look like, even when really they look so beautiful but they cannot see it because this disorder has it covered up. Body image of these girls who do not even look like they do in magazines is hurting helpless women around the world.  

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"Ethnic Magazine Editors Talk About Body Image." Tell Me More 4 July 2007. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Apr. 2014.

         In this broadcast, hosted by Michel Martin of Tell Me More from NPR News, he interviews three talented people from different magazines. Each magazine was doing a cover on swimsuits, that’s what the magazine was running. Usually magazines have these super skinny models in al the swimsuits but in one of the magazine, Essence Magazine, has different sizes women in the swimsuits. They do not advertise these skinny girls in the bathing suits, but they put size 16, 12, 14 in swimsuits that flatter their bodies. By Tatsha Robertson, senior news editor, putting this in the magazine does not give women the self-confidence that all the other magazine do, but it gives them confidence in loving their bodies. Betty Cortina, Editorial director of Latina magazine, does a similar thing that Essence Magazine does; they also featured a variety of women sizes in the magazine. She also says that there is a variety of healthy sense of women. Anita Malik, Editor in Chief of East West Magazine does something a little different. In this magazine they featured a healthy model and they did different looks of this model with how to use cover-ups. This helps women from not being able to wear something when they can but they can cover-up something and still look adorable. They all something so similar, they do not use those super skinny women that other women feel self-confidence about, they want to help women with feeling comfortable with their bodies. After they explain their magazines they get questions about other complains, and they get about culture differences. People are different in their own way; this part helps the essay in McGraw hill reader because they talk about that body image is not just in America, but in other cultures as well. 

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Beating Ana by Shannon Cutts: Your Good Thoughts Hold Great Power

Beating Ana by Shannon Cutts: Your Good Thoughts Hold Great Power | Eating disorders Around the World | Scoop.it
When I was young, I was in love with Luke Skywalker. I was also sure that, if offered the option, I would not have struggled one bit to choose between Jedi-dom and "the Dark Side." Yet, given my own mind's long and well-documented affinity for negative thinking, perhaps my youthful confidence was a tad premature. The "dark side" is fueled by anger, regret, pain. For many years, I, too, was fueled by the same. I'm in my 40's now, and am just now learning how to teach my mind to seek - and like - and trust - the light....
Carolyn Paris's insight:

Cutts, Shannon. "Your Good Thoughts Hold Great Power." Web log post. Eating Disorders Blogs Beating Ana. N.p., 31 Mar. 2014. Web. 04 Apr. 2014.

        In this blog, written by Shannon Cutts, talks about her darkest days. Shannon has been dealing with eating disorders. Now she doesn’t come right out and say that she does in this blog, but her website is about eating disorders. Over the years, she has been in the dark about her body, and now in her 40s she is just now noticing that she needs to get into the light. Over the years, she did not see herself as being beautiful, skinny, or anything of that nature. She was in the dark, being the total opposite of what she is, and her mind made her think this way. It takes time to get better, but she is getting better one step at a time. Eating disorders are like this because your mind makes you think that you are this person that your not. This blog shows her readers that she is a victim of eating disorder and she is getting the strength by sharing how she is making it through beating the horrible disease. This blog is great for my paper because it is someone’s story of an eating disorder. This will build a strong reference because this blog is all about her eating disorder and this blog is showing that she needs to get to the light with her illness. 

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"For Boys With Eating Disorders, Finding Treatment Can Be Hard." Morning Edition 7 Oct. 2013. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Apr. 2014.

       Normally when talking about eating disorders and body image you think of women, but really men can struggle with the same kind of disease that women do. Thirteen- year old boy named Jonathon Noyes started binging about three years ago. He started because his family was going through some issues, and he noticed he was overeating. Jonathon tried to stop, he never thought it was a big issue to stop over eating, but he noticed that he needed the peanut butter. He started throwing up because kids would bully him at school because he was overweight. His parents never noticed that Jonathon was doing this he managed to hide, but his mom said that she would have never guessed her son would be doing this. But she noticed when he started coming home from school sick all the time. Boys are different than girls; because boys do not want to be skinny they want to be lean and muscular. It happens the same way girls do because they see the images of these people who have great bodies and they want that. This is such an interesting article because you would never guess that boys would be dealing with the same issues that girls do. But it is just like in the essay in McGraw hill reader because no one would expect that other cultures would be dealing with the same thing. 

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"Parent Alert: Family Battles With Eating Disorder." Today [Video] 29 Feb. 2008. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Apr. 2014.

     In this video of the Today’s show, a mother, Lorri Benson, and her daughter, Taryn Benson, fought through an eating disorder of almost the same. They both wrote a book on their experiences called Distorted.  Both of them had the same illness but it is different in so many ways. Taryn was so beautiful, top of her class, popular but you did not know her self-esteem was rock bottom. Her mom says that she was so gorgeous but when she hit bulimia her personality changed, like being really sensitive to things and also wants to be perfect at things. Taryn did not see herself like she sees they pictures now, this beautiful young high school girl. She saw herself as this overweight girl; also she didn’t like how she was reflected on how she saw herself. But it did not matter what anyone told her, she saw herself as this girl who was overweight. Taryn talks about the diseases and how anorexia gave her control, while bulimia helped her with the anxiety. Taryn struggled with both diseases and tried to hide them as well as she could. This video is such a good interview because it shows a real life person who went through it and it also shows what was affecting her. 

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"Looking Good." The Wilson Quarterly 24.3 (2000): 10. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Apr. 2014.

     Normally when you ask someone what ethic group has eating disorders everyone says American girls. American girls want to be this certain height, certain weight, and look a certain way. But African American girls do not look at those standards; they look at personality and personal traits. But with American girls, they only look at their appearances. Most American girls are not confidence with their bodies, the always want to change the way they look. But with African American girls feel attractive, even very attractive. Women have this beauty image that they want to follow but with African American girls it is totally different. Nichter concludes that “Looking good” in a black community has more to do with attitude than appearance. Nichter make some good points, but it is the opposing viewpoint of the essay in McGraw Hill reader, because eating disorders and body image is in all ethic groups around the world. This would help that essay because it shows what the opposing people think about eating disorders and body images, that it is only in American girls, when truly it is everywhere. 

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Bennett, Jessica. "The Fashion Industry Promotes Eating Disorders."    Eating Disorders. Ed. Roman Espejo. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012.   Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Why Skinny Models Are Making Us Fat." Newsweek (8 Feb. 2007). Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Apr. 2014.

        In this article, written by Jessica Bennett, talks about what is causing the issues that women are having with their images. Bennett says that with America growing more obese and getting bigger, models have began to get taller and thinner, which is causing women to feel worse about their bodies. Women like to look at the pretty models in the magazines, but really they are looking at a photographer editing the picture to make it look better.  Magazines are always thinning their thighs, making their stomach look better, but this is causing women to lack their self-confidence about their image. Bennett talks about that with this happening, it is becoming more affecting by younger children in grammar school. Women are becoming more worried about their body image, that it is causing more women to have some sort of eating disorder. With technology becoming more advanced it is making it easier for women to look up anything, like photos of models, movies of famous actress etc. this is not good for our society.  Young girls, older women fantasize about being a size 0 or even a size 2, never do they want to be curvy like a size 16. Women want to be that beautiful model walking down the runway, or even those actresses in the movies, but even if you do not look like that your still beautiful. This article connects so well with the essay in the McGraw Hill reader because they both talk about eating disorders and body images that women try to be.  But in reality they are not helping themselves they are only hurting them. 

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